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Third New Hampshire Flag.- 
State House Rotunda. 




Tmiu) New Hampshike Flags. 



i86i l86^ 



THE 



THIRD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



AND ALL ABOUT IT. 



BY D. ELDREDGE, 
Captain third New Hampshire vol. inf. 



BOSTON, MASS. : 
Press of E. B. Stillings and Company. 

1893 









COPYKIGHT, 1893, BY D. ElDUEDCtE. 









Ovljis it^olunxE 



RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 



BY THE AUTHOR. 




Thv rugged hills, O State ! 
Are but the types of men 
Who stood like solid walls 

Before the enemy, 
On many a battle-field. 

Thy sturdy sons were they, 

A nd nobly duty did perform ; 

Nor recke'd they what they risked ; 

For their own selves no thought had they : 

They only sought for victory. 

To thee, New Hampshire, honored State ! 

To thee, this book I dedicate. 

— D. E. 



^\A0 



AUTHOR'S PREFACE. 




HE THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE! Who shall write its 
history? AVho shall truthfully depict its battles and 
bivouacs? Who shall faithfully describe its marches 
and its camps? Who shall relate, in language bold, its 
experiences and vicissitudes? Who shall correctly state all 
its changes of station, of numbers? Who will have the cour- 
age and assiduity to collect and collate all the multitudinous 
data ? And who will write the book which shall carry to posterity 
all that need be known of the Third New Hampshire ? 

These and similar questions have agitated, more or less, the 
various members of the old Third, but more particularly when as- 
sembled in annual reunion. The question was tossed about, as a 
ball is tossed, from one to another; but for a long time without 
result. This one was erratic ; that one was too old ; the other was 
too young ; another lacked continuity ; another was too outspoken ; 
another didn't live in the right part of the country, etc., etc. 

The informal nominations and rejections and declinations con- 
tinued from year to year, until John C. Linehan of Penacook, N.H., 
was requested to write the history. He had the temerity to accept 
the position. This gentleman seemed eminently qualified, and the 
boys became hopeful. Comrade Linehan was a prominent member 
of the original regimental band, and he "knew everybody." Again, 
he was the leading spirit in the State reunions, and was identified 
with all Grand Army matters in the State. This gentleman strug- 
gled more or less with this hydra-headed historical monster for a 
year or two, and calmly, serenely and formally surrendered at 
Weirs, at the reunion in August, 1887. 

Maj. Wm. H. Trickey had been appointed Historian at one time 
(date uncertain) ; and he struggled manfully with the subject, but 
surrendered. Long before this, it having been fully understood that 
Linehan had practically surrendered, Adjt. Copp and others were 

(vii) 



viii AUTHOR'S PREFACE. 

appointed to assist the Historian ; but it was fully understood that 
Copp was the man . to undertake the task, and the others would 
assist. "Now we have him!" said the boys. And it did really 
seem that they were not mistaken. Adjt. Copp, from his position 
as Adjutant of the regiment, and by education, was certainly com- 
petent; and of his perseverance none doubted. His time, too, 
was supposed to be not wholly occupied, as he was the Register of 
Probate of Hillsboro' County, residing at Nashua ; and the general 
impression is that all such positions admit of a little literary work. 
Well, Comrade Copp struggled with the subject, making no sub- 
stantial progress, however, and finally ceased his efforts and 
gracefully laid down his arms at "Weirs on the same day with 
Comrade Linehan. 

A few minutes later, and the writer was appointed ; why, he 
hardly knows. How did this happen? Well, to make short a long 
story, it was in this wise : Several of the members of the regiment, 
residing in and near Boston, were invited to come together for a 
purely social time, by Lieut. Holt, who by chance was in Boston 
(from the West) for a short period. He desired to meet his old 
comrades, and they were indeed pleased to meet him. They met at 
the Crawford House on the evening of the 21st of October, 1886; 
and there were present about fifteen of the old Third, including 
Col. Jackson, Brevet-Maj. Edgerly, Brevet-Brig. -Gen. Donohoe (old 
Captain of Co. C) and others. During the evening, the subject of 
the desired regimental history was introduced. By some hocus 
pocus my name was suggested (how I wish now that the guilty party 
was known to me !), and after much importunity and flattery, deftly 
woven together, in my innocence I said "Yes, I'll try." (This was 
ratified later at the Weirs.) But how I have regretted the decision ! 
My friends say I have grown gray rapidly since that possibly fatal 
moment. Having said "I'll try," several questions immediately 
presented themselves. What form shall it take? What methods 
shall I pursue to obtain the information desired? How much shall 
I write? What sort of information shall be excluded? How far 
shall I go in my researches ? Shall the whole truth be told, regi- 
mental or individual, or both? In fact, a perfect avalanche of 
questions came sliding down upon me, in such volume and rapidity 
as to nearly overwhelm me. When nearly recovered from the first 
shock, it occurred to me that probably a history arranged something 
like an almanac would be all that could be desired. I formulated 
one of this kind and looked at it frequently, filling in important 
events, till it fairly burst the original bounds (of almanac style) , and 



AUTHOR'S PREFACE. ix 

its boundaries were undefined. About this time I began reading up 
(cramming, some call it) all obtainable literature concerning the 
regiment ; and I discovered that there were already three histories of 
the old Third : brief, to be sure ; but accounts or narratives they 
were, and not to be ignored. One was by Maj. Bedel, and pub- 
lished in one of the monthly magazines. Another was prepared for 
the Adjutant-General's (N. H.) Report of 1866, Vol. V.; and the 
third was in a book purporting to give the history of all the New 
Hampshire troops, and was apparently made up from the material in 
the first two named. The discovery of these accounts, instead of 
being discouraging, as might have been supposed, had the opposite 
effect, /.p., of spurring me on to produce something better. A later 
question arose, as to what style the history should be written in. 
Several regimental histories were examined, to assist in arriving at a 
proper conclusion ; but the more these were examined, the farther 
away I was from the desired point. No two pursued the same 
course. Shall I try to be sarcastic? Shall I try to be humorous? 
Shall I criticise my superior officers? Shall I caustically arraign 
every officer who lost a battle? Shall I state the fact if any officer 
or man was court-martialed? If any behaved unseemly in the face 
of the enemy, shall it be mentioned ? If any officer by stealth and 
craft raised his rank faster than the regulation speed, shall it be 
mentioned ? Shall the book be embellished with pictures of battles, 
of forts, of places? Shall the faces of the officers, and none others, 
be seen in this book ? Shall all be put in who are willing to pay the 
extra expense, whether officers or men? and if yes, what shall be 
the manner of arrangement? Shall it be sold by subscription, and 
at what price ? These and a thousand other questions filled the breast 
of the Historian, and that he actually survives is truly wonderful. 

Being a firm believer in the value of histories, — assuming that 
they are correctly written, — the writer was led into a train of 
thought which produced at its end this : Why should n't the State 
foster and encourage the compiling and writing of the histories of its 
regiments, by rendering material aid ? And why should n't the State 
supply so good a thing to each town and library within its borders ? 
The more this train of thought was pursued, the more convinced the 
writer became, that the State would do something in the line indi- 
cated if the matter was properly brought to its attention. The fact 
that New Hampshire had done more for its soldiers than many other 
States, encouraged me to proceed. Measures were taken to accom- 
plish the desired result. The proposition was favorably considered 
by the Legislature of 1887, and a bill was passed. (See copy of 
bill in Appendix C.) 



X AUTHOR'S PREFACE. 

All those legislators who favored the bill are deserving of the 
highest commendation ; and it is to be hoped that the results fol- 
lowing will justify their action and reflect credit upon them, the 
State and the writers of the several histories. The passage of the 
bill at once stimulated the desire for regimental histories ; and the 
probable result will be that all the regiments will be represented by 
histories at no distant day. 

As to the Third New Hampshire, whose history it is my lot to 
write, my greatest stimulant is the fact that I believe, with many 
others, that it was one of the best regiments the State sent out. Be 
it far from me to puff up the regiment to the extent some historians 
do their particular regiments. It has been my pleasure (?) to read 
regimental histories that might as well have been written in a single 
line upon a card, thus : "The 1415th Delaware Regiment conquered 
the Rebellion. — John Jones, Historian." It is next to impossible 
for me to condense to that degree or to make up the material, the 
which, condensed, would read just like the above sample. 

Now, as to the scope. Shall what is written be only of the 
Third New Hampshire, or shall other regiments be mentioned ? In 
a battle where other regiments were engaged, would it be in good 
taste or truthful to ignore the presence or assistance of other troops ? 
Assuredly not. Hence will be found, at frequent intervals, the fact 
that there were other troops in the army, and that the Third New 
Hampshire simply joined forces with other regiments, and together 
the battles were won. As to scope, again. The question arose as 
to whether it would he politic to confine the matters to Third New 
Hampshire items — to surround the regiment, as it were, with a 
Chinese Wall. Long ago the writer decided that he would erect no 
such wall, but that such matter should be inserted as should not only 
make it more interesting for a Third New Hampshire soldier and his 
immediate relatives and friends, but that, to a certain extent, any 
one desiring to read an account pertaining to the war, might gather, 
by reading the book, a fairly clear idea of war and its phases, 
pleasant and unpleasant ; and thus, as some writer has said, " secure 
a larger circulation." 

The writer lays no claim to any considerable degree of educa- 
tion ; neither is he a "literary feller." Hence it follows that as a 
literary work it will probably be a failure. He did not keep a diary 
during the war, for which fact he is truly sorrowful ; but he has 
borrowed several and made good use of their contents. 

In the collection of data, valuable assistance has been rendered 
by large numbers of comrades : and to them, one and all, my thanks 



AUTHOR'S PREFACE. xi 

are clue, and they are entitled to much credit. The Hj'drographic 
Officer of Boston rendered aid, too, in placing at my call the U. S. 
Coast Survey maps of the entire Atlantic coast. The large and 
valuable library of the Massachusetts Commandery of the Loyal 
Legion of the U. S., at Boston, Mass., has been of very great use 
and assistance, it being one of the largest collections of war litera- 
ture in the country. Several of the officers turned over to me all 
their official papers, returns, orders, etc. Others have loaned old 
letters, diaries and parts of diaries, so that the information given 
can be generally relied upon as correct. 

An "Introduction," or, as it is generally termed, "The Author's 
Preface," usually proves to be an excuse for writing the book at all. 
Practically he says: "Ah! please excuse me; but I am about to 
inflict upon you a species of pain, under the guise of pleasure." 
Having spent so much time, and thought, and labor, upon this work, 
it does not seem fitting that I should say, " You are about to be 
pained; go slow !" 

Now that the end of the Introduction seems so near, the mind 
of the writer is moving forward to the point where he will be obliged 
to begin the work itself ; and he is almost overwhelmed with another 
set of conundrums like these : Shall the history begin with the Third 
New Hampshire organized and mustered in, or will he take up the 
fragments (companies) and carefully place them together, and then 
set them on their march? Shall I mention a few other events pre- 
ceding the birth of the Third New Hampshire, and then gradually 
lead the reader up to the birth of the regiment? Having come to a 
sudden determination as to what method to pursue, risking much, 
the Introduction ends right here, and possibly you heave a deep sigh 
of relief, and at once plunge into the History itself. 

DANIEL ELDREDGE. 



NOTE TO AUTHOR'S PREFACE.— I. 

In arranging the matter for writing up, the writer has found it 
to be well-nigh impossible to make an arbitrary separation between 
regimental matter, company matter, and personal experience. He 
has struggled in vain upon numerous occasions with the problem, 
and has finally given it up in despair.' Therefore, the matter will 
be homogeneous, and the reader will be left to say to himself at 
intervals, — frequently, too, — What has this got to do with the Third 
New Hampshire? or What has this got to do with a regimental 
history? or What's he got so much of his personal history injected 



xii AUTHOR'S PREFACE. 

into this for? The only reply possible to make to these conundrums 
is, that any writer writes from his own standpoint, relates what he 
sees, what he knows, what his experience was, and so on ; and it 
cannot be otherwise. If he was cold and hungry on a certain 
named occasion, if he saw such and such an event : the relation of 
these will be only a counterpart, precisely, of what others in same 
regiment, or same company, or same squad, suffered or saw, as the 
case may be ; and therein is part and parcel of the regimental whole, 
therefore not assumptive, not unreasonable ; but the writer fully 
justified, and ought to be absolved from any charge of intense 
personality. D. E. 

NOTE TO AUTHOR'S PREFACE. — II. 

(This note is explanatory — wholly so.) 

During the year 1865, while yet in the service (Third Veteran 
Reserve Corps), I undertook to put on paper a memorandum account 
of what my military experience had been. I had, among other 
reasons for so doing : firstly, my time was largely unoccupied ; 
secondly, I flattered myself that it was a small matter and it could 
be dashed off in a few days, not using probably more than half a 
dozen sheets of ordinary paper ; and thirdly, to preserve data while 
fresh in my mind, which might be of possible value thereafter to 
myself or family, and would be entirely or at least partially forgot- 
ten in a few years. 

Result : I required many quires of paper, and covered over two 
or three years' time ere the end was reached ; and it may properly be 
said of the result, that having been written at the dates named, the 
matters given in the history of the Third New Hampshire may be 
fairly relied upon as being free from the defects arising from strains 
upon memory. This personal history partakes largely of regimental 
and company matters — and it was impossible to avoid such ; and it 
may as well be now and here stated that in writing the History of 
the Third New Hampshire, the personal experiences of the writer, as 
above named, have been largely relied upon as a basis. 

D. E. 



NOTE TO AUTHOR'S PREFACE. — III. 

Saturday, 28 May 1892, in sheer desperation, but filled with 
fear and apprehension, I place my manuscript in the hands of the 
printers. D. E. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 



The Author is under ^reat obligation for assistance of every kind 
rendered by his comrades, Avithout whose aid this history would have been 
simply impossible. The comrades generally have responded to calls ; and 
he desires to assure them, one and all, that he is filled with gratitude for 
the services rendered and rejoices at the result. Where all have so freely 
contributed to the great mass required in the preparation of this history, 
the writer deems it uuAvise to give one credit above another. The follow- 
ing credits to parties outside of the regiment are inserted and particularized 
for reasons stated : — 

To the Hydrographic Office, Boston, Mass., for use of Coast Survey charts. 

To D. C. Wilson (Master Carpenter of the Port Royal Expedition) and H. 
G. Judd, both of Beaufort, S. C, for aid in producing map of Hilton 
Head. 

To C. L. Webster & Co., Publishers, New York, for use of plates on pages 
473 and 599, and Seat of War insert. 

To Maj. John Johnson (Confederate) of Charleston, S. C, author of "De- 
fence of Charleston Harbor," 1890, for use of plates on pages 267, 
271, 338, 383-398 and 633. 

To Codman & Shurtlefl', Boston, for use of plate on page 1044. 

To Wm. A. Snow, Jr., a cadet from Massachusetts, at Naval Academy, 
Annapolis, Md., for plan of the Academy buildings and grounds. 

To J. Harwood Iglehart of Annapolis, Md., Secretary of the Anne Arundel 
Historical Society, for map of Annapolis. 

To the Historian of the Thirteenth New Hampshire "Volunteers, Lieut. 
S. Millett Thompson of Providence, R. I., for right to use plate on 
page 83. 



To the Adjutant-General of New Hampshire, Gen. Augustus D. Ayling, 
and his able assistant, Mr. Harry P. Hammond, for needed assist- 
ance in correcting and completing the multitudinous data insepar- 
ably connected with the preparation of a regimental history. For 
prompt responses to every call ; for readiness to assist in many 
ways, and never-failing courtesy, they are both entitled to much 
credit. 

(xiii) 




INSIGNIA, 
SOCIETY OF THE CINCINNATI. 



ERRATA. 



[This includes corrections of all kinds, together with omissions, additions 
and explanations, and is purposely inserted at the beginning of the book 
rather than at its end, as is customary. — D.E.] 

Page 

259 " Fred Waters, ," should read " , Baritone." 

.')6.S At bottom : Lieut. Brown should read Lieut. Bowen. 

658 After the tirst paragraph, add : — 

Same day, Gen. Schotield (Headciuarters at Raleigh) ordered Maj.- 
Gen. Terry with his Tenth Corps and one brigade of Kautz' Cavalry, 
to occupy Raleigh, Goldsboro' and Fayetteville, and take care of the 
central part of the State, and that Gens. Palmer and Hawley remain 
in charge of the Coast Districts, as heretofore. 

Our drummers were put to the front (of an audience) on the night 
of the 6th, at the theatre. A prize drill was the occasion, and the 
prize was won by Thomas Hennessey of F. This little diversion 
Avas heightened in interest by the fact that during the day new 
drums were issued to our "sheepskin fiddlers." 

We were nearing the end. Gen. Schofield, on the 10th, in ac- 
cordance with instructions from Washington, directed the immediate 
muster-out of all ofticers and soldiers whose terms were to expire 
before the end of the month ; and on the 10th he directed that de- 
scriptive lists of all absent men be sent at once to the places they 
were supposed to be located. 

79!) Nathan W. Gove, N. C. S. : add " died 8 Aug. 71, at Concord, N.H." 

800 Samuel F. Brown, Band : add " disch. for disability 3 Apr. 62." 

801 Geo. E. Johnston, A : add " res'd Avarrant Oct. 61." 
804 David H. Newton, A : add " N.H. S.H." 

804 H. T. Hatch, A : was disch. 25 Aug. 64, Hilton Head, instead of 

" m.o. 23 Aug. 64." 
807 Amasa J. Pervier, A : should read " Amasa J. Peavear." 
807 James E. White, A : add " to Corpl. 8 March 64 " (was Corpl. at 

death). 
811 W. S. Marston, B : trans. 18 Oct, 63 to U.S. B.C. 

813 James Cavender, B : representative recruit for A. A. Cox of Enfield. 

814 Abdalonymus Huntoon, B : wd. 10 July 63 (also page 897). 

817 Bryan Costello, C : should read " Bi'yau Castello." 

818 P. Killelea, C : add " wd. 18 July 63." 

819 Terrence O'Brien, C : strike out " to Corpl. 26 Aug. 64." 

825 Barney Quinn, C : add " to Mus. 21 Jan. 64" (was m.o. as Mus.) 

826 Joseph W. Akerman, D : should read " enl. 21 May 61." 

827 Benj. Brown, D : add " died Oct. 72, Hampton Falls, N.H." 

827 Hale B. Dearborn, D : add " died 11 Oct. 65, Richmond, Va." 

828 Wm. R. Knowles, D : should read " re-enl. 28 Jan. 64." 
828 Robt. E.Foster, D : add " N.H. S.H." 

834 Daniel H. Brown, E: record amended by War Dept., and disch. to 

date 22 June 63. 
841 Patrick Courtney, F : add " furl. May 63, Botany Bay." 

841 Joseph A. W. Damon, F: record amended July 93 — "disch. for 

disability 18 Nov. 62." 

842 Warren Green, F : add " furl. May 63, Botany Bay." 

(XV) 



xvi ERRATA. 

Page 
842 Alfred P. Hayden, F : strike out " wd. 30 June 63." 

842 G. W. Emerson, F: should read " disch. 25 Oct. 64, Chapin's Farm, 

Va." 

843 Hiram Pierce, F: add " N.H. S.H." 

855 Alrick Evans, G : should read " wd. and m.a. 16 May 64, n.f .r." 

856 Horace Joslin, G: should read " to Wagoner," instead of to Corpl." 

(m.o. as Wag.) 
858 Henry C. Page, H : should read " disch. disability 20 May 63." 
861 Timothy Parker, H : should read " disch. disability 20 May 63." 
874 James Hines, I : record amended by War Dept., and disch. to date 

2 March 25. 

880 James F. Johnson, K: record amended by War Dept., and disch. to 

date 14 April 64. 

881 J. W. Parkinson, K : was disch. with company 23 Aug. 64. 
899 P. Killelea, C : add " wounded 18 July G3." 

909 Nathaniel Marshall, B : should read " Co. A." 

911 Barney Conner, C: should read "Bernard O'Conner." 

911 Thos. Coflrey: should read " Thos. Cottay." 

915 Joseph Ela, C : should read " Joseph Ely." 

918 Chas. Brown, 2d, D : should read " Chas. Brown, 1st." 

922 John L. Gerrish, I : should read " George L. Gerrish." 

946 Henry Cargain, C : should read " Henry Carrigan." 

946 John Campbell, F: should read "James Campbell." 

948 Geo. W. Harvey, F : should read " George Harney." 

951 George L. Thomas, A : should read " George S. Thomas." 

955 Joseph A. W. Damon, F : see page 841, this list. 

957 After Thos. Smith should appear: "John H. Thing, transferred to 

N.C.S." 
997 Maj. W. T. M. Burger : should read " Maj. W. L. M. Burger." 
1015 Wm. W. Ballard, G : should read " Wm. W. W. Ballard." 
1017 James DeGraw, F : should read " John D. Graw." 

1029 The middle of page : Henry Miller was a volunteer recruit and gave 

Canada as his birthplace. (Another Henry Miller in F afterAvard : 
born in Germany, and was a substitute recruit.) See page 1020. 

1030 EugeTie Codorath : should read " Eugene Cadorath." 
1030 John Kearin : should read "John Rearing." 

Band. [Note. — In the several cases where members of the original baud 
served afterward in the Second Brigade Band, they have not been 
noted " O.S."] 



ILLUSTRATIONS, MAPS, PLANS, ETC. 



Battle Flags Frontispiece 

Insignia, Society of the Cincinnati xiv 

"Woman's Relief Corps Badge xxxi 

Fort Sumter, 1861 3 

Maj. Robert Anderson 3 

Concord, N.H. Map, 8 

Style of Cap, Third New Hampshire, 1801 18 

Mineola, Long Island Map, 24 

" Cooper Shop " Restaurant 27 

"A" Tent 33 

Corps Badges 34 

Annapolis, Md. Map, 38 

Naval Academy Map, ><U 

Commodore 8. F. Dupont . 48 

Port Royal Map, 55 

Fort Walker 60 

Plan of Naval Attack 60 

Steamer Atlantic 61 

Port Royal Fight 63 

Hilton Head Island Map, 64 

Negro Hut 77 

Hifton Head, 1864 Map, 80 

Pope's, Hilton Head 81 

Infantry Regiment Line of Battle 83 

Shoulder Straps 84 

Hard-Bread, Box of 84 

Department Headquarters, Hilton Head 88 

Gen. Drayton's, Hilton Head 93 

Camp at Hilton Head Plan, 112 

Live Oaks, Daufuskie Island 120 

Cemetery, Third New Hampshire 128 

Edisto Island Map, 143 

Fort Pulaski 146 

Fort Pulaski Bombardment Plan, 147 

Canteen 158 

Steamer Planter 161 

Cook's Kitchen 162 

Grand Army Badge 164 

Secessionville (Fort Lamar) 172 

James Island Map, 176 

Soldier's Cap 185 

Important Factors 186 

General Hospital Plan, 188 

Candle-stick 191 

Palmetto 196 

Cotton 213 

Wall Tent 217 

Chevrons, etc 218 

(XVli) 



xviii ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. 

Page 

Magnolia 227 

Cheval-de-Frise 227 

Soldiers' Tools and Food 229 

Trous-de-Loup 230 

Turkey Buzzard 230 

Knife, Fork and Spoon 236 

Cartridge Box 240 

Mocking Bird 245 

Hats and Caps 248 

Musket and Bayonets ......... 250 

Camp Kettles Boiling 255 

Soldiers' Necessities 256 

Alligator 258 

Grape Shot 264 

Canister 264 

Stretcher 264 

Fort Sumter, 7 April 1863, showing Effect of Bombardment . 267 

Fort Sumter, Plan of • . . . 271 

Camp Misei'y, Botany Bay 277 

Fig Leaf and Fruit 280 

Cook's Headquarters, Botany Bay 282 

'Possum . . . . ' 286 

Drum 294 

Folly Island Batteries 299 

Scene at Morris Island, 10 July 1863 301 

Siege of Charleston Map, 302 

Battery Wagner, 18 July 1863 313 

Siege of Morris Island Map, 320 

Beacon House, Morris Island 330 

Bar Shot 335 

Chain Shot 335 

Fort Johnson, Plan of 338 

Confederate Battle Flag 344 

Bomb and Splinter-Proof 348 

Battery Wagner at Point of Assault 349 

Nevj Ironsides and Monitor 350 

Battery Wagner, Sea Front 351 

Percussion Bullet 352 

Whitworth Ball 353 

Confederate Flag 360 

Minie Ball ." 364 

U.S. Service Bullet 364 

Torpedo, Morris Island 369 

Swamp Angel 370 

Swamp Angel, Trenton, N.J 372 

Swamp Angel Tablet 373 

Requa Battery (three views) 377 

Battery Wagner 383 

Fort Sumter after Bombardment 387 

Fort Sumter after Bombardment 392 

Fort Moultrie Plan, 394 

Sea Coast Gun 397 

David Torpedo Boat 398 

Camp Kettles and Mess Pans 401 

Military Telegraph 411 

Weehawken 412 

Hauling Cannon on Beach 416 

Libby Prison 418 

Chevrons, " Term" and " War " 422 

Raccoon 430 

Camp of Company of Cavalry 434 

Salisbury Prison . . " 441 



ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. xix 

Page 

Enfleld Rifle U2 

Springfield Rifle U2 

Spencer Carbine 442 

Shelter Tent 444 

Jacksonville to Palatka Map, 445 

Steamer North Star 453 

American Eagle 455 

Mortar 457 

Signal Tower 458 

Operations of 13, 14, 15, 16 May 1864 .... 3Iap, 464 

Defences of Richmond and Petersburg .... Map, 467 

Drewry's Blntt", 13 May 1864 469 

Wooldridge's Hill, 13 May 1864 470 

Bermuda Hundred, Va Map, 473 

Works at Burmuda Hundred 483 

On Picket 484 

Grand Army Pin 484 

Pontoon Bridge, Jones' Landing 487 

Petersburg, 9 June 1864 Plan, 492 

Bermuda Hundred, four camps 504, 505 

Drum 508 

Rosette, Loyal Legion 514 

Bullet Proof 517 

Shrapnel Shell 518 

Chesapeake Hospital 527 

Railroad Bridge, Norfolk & Western R.R 534 

Morris Island, September, 1864 536 

Butler's Headquarters near Dutch Gap 543 

Rifle-Pits 546 

Fort Sumter, 1892 551 

Oflicers' Swords 554 

Army Wagon 558 

Cavalry 561 

Group (Canteen, Haversack, Cap) 564 

Bermuda Hundred, showing new railroad built since the war . 568 

Spencer Carbine 571 

Mounted Officer 572 

Beaufort Harbor, N. C Map, 574 

Spencer Carbine (parts enlarged) 576 

Musket 577 

Fort Fisher, Armament Plan, 592 

Fort Fisher, Naval Attack Plan, 595 

Fort Fisher, Vicinity of 599 

Stockade 605 

Fort Fisher, Attack of Naval Column 607 

Fort Fisher, Interior 609 

Mound Battery 611 

Armstrong Gun 614 

Fort Sumter, February, 1865 633 

Wilmington, N. C, 22 Feb. 1865 638 

Last Engagement (North-East Ferry) 639 

Badge of Loyal Legion 643 

Causten's House 645 

Location of Camp 646 

Marine Hospital 646 

Court House 647 

Old Jail 652 

City Hall 653 

Old House 654 

A Day Oft' 662 

North Carolina Campaign Map, 664, 665 

Arrangement of Stars in Flag 668 



XX ILLUSTRATIONS, ETC. 

Page 

Canteen G75 

Stacked Arms 677 

Seat of War 3Iap, 680 

Sons of Veterans' Badge 888 

Gillmore Medal 1014 

Hospital Steward's Chevrons 1026 

Military Execution Plan, 1033 

Draft Rendezvous 1038 

Third New Hampshire Building at the "Weirs .... 1041 

Headquarters Building at the Weirs 1042 

Tourniquet 1044 

•' Sing it as we used to sing it," etc. . . . . • . 105.5 




LIST OK PORTRAITS. 



Avi:k, Henry H. . 

Al.I.KX, HoHERT H. 

Atheuton, Arlon S. 
Akerman, J. Warren 

Ahbott, Joseph C, Gen 
Bedel, John 

BUTTERFIELD, WeLBEE 

BuRNHAM, Charles S. 
Bingham, George B. 
BowEN, Edwln N. 
BuzzELL, Andrew J. H 
Burnham, Charles A. 
Brown, D. Arthur 

Berry, Nathaniel S., Go\ 
Clark, Rufus F. . 
Cody, Walter 
Corp, Elrridge J. (2) 

Colby, Anthony, Adjt.-Gen. 
Dunbar, Charles F. 
DoNOHOE, Michael T 
Dodge, William Ladd 
Donley, Michael P. (2) 
Ela, Richard 
Edgerly-, J. Homer (2) 
Eldredge, Daniel 
Fellows, Enoch Q. 
Fogg, Andrew J. . 
Gorman, Cyrus 
Graham, John G. . 

GiLLMORE, QUINCY' A., GeN. 

Gilmore, Joseph A., Gov. 
Handerson, Henry C. 
Hill, Henry . 
Healey% George W. (2) 
Houghton, Ruthven W. 
Holt, Marquis L. 

Head, Natt, Ajdt.-Gi' 

Hawley, Joseph R., Gen. 

Hunter, David, Gen. 
Ingalls, Gustavus W. 
Jackson, John H. 
Jackman, Lemuel N. 
Jackson, Thomas M. 
LiBBY, Alvan H. . 
LiNEHAN, John C. 
Maxwell, William H. 



Page 
1008 
888 
656 
1008 
152 
192 
616 
480 
784 
656 
976 
976 
408 

16 
224 
888 
272 

16 
224 
888 
784 
272 
712 
712 
712, 720 
192 
224 
520 
520 

48 

32 
584 
1008 
520 
792 
584 

32 
152 

48 
616 
192 
584 
784 
976 
352 
1008 



(xxi) 



xxii MST OF PORTRAITS. 

Page 

Marsh, Henky A 480 

MoRKiLL, Frank L 784 

MiTCHEL, Ormsby McK., Gen 48 

Nesmith, Arthur S 888 

Plimpton, Josiah 1 584 

Parker, John M 656 

Randlett, James F 480 

Sherman, Thomas W., Gen. 48 

Strong, George C, Gen 88 

Sfa-mour, Truman, Gen 152 

Smyth, Frederick, Gov 32 

Sanborn, Peter, State Treas 16 

Thompson, John H. . 656 

Trickey, William H 616 

Terry, Alfred H., Gen 88 

Tenny, Allen, Sec. of State 16 

ViELE, Egbert L., Gen. 88 

Wadlia, Andrew J 224 

Woodbury, Roger W. (2) 792 

Wadsworth, David, Jr 480 

White, Charles A 792 




CONTENTS. 



Page 

Dedicatory v 

Author's Preface vii 

Acknowledgments xiii 

Errata xv 

List of Illustrations, Maps, etc xvii 

List of Portraits . xxi 

AUCxUST, 18G1, AND PRIOR. 

War Preparation — Fort Sumter — First New Hampshire Volunteers 

— Second New Hampshire Volunteers — Third New Hampshire 
Volunteers — The Pay — The Bounty — The Companies — Their 
Arrival — The Band — Gen. Sherman — Mustered In — Daily 
Items, August, 1861 —Supplement 1 

SEPTEMBER, 1861. 

The Cost of the Regiment — Its Composition — Concord to Long 
Island — Camp at Miueola — Visiting Hempstead — Camp Life 
on Hempstead Plains — Long Island to AVashington (in haste) 

— Camp near Congressional Cemetery — Visited by the Presi- 
dent — War Alarms — War Preparations — Flag Presentation 

— Supplement 19 

OCTOBER, 1861. 

Washington to Annapolis — Hard Floors in Academy Buildings — 
Change to Tents on Banks Severn River — Flag Presentation 

— Steamers Appear in Harbor — Preparations to Embark — 
Embarked on the Atlantic — Fog and Storm- — Start for For- 
tress Monroe — Arrive there — The Fleet Assembling — Paid 
Oft" — Final Preparations — Fleet Leaves for Port Royal — The 
Storm — Supplement 35 

NOVEMBER, 1861. 

The Storm — Sea Incidents in a Storm — Casualties — The Fleet 
Arrives oft' Hilton Head — The Fight Described — A Man Dies 
on Shipboard — The Troops Land — On Land in Secessia — 
New Camp — Cotton Rows levelled — Landing of Stores and 
Ammunition — Camp Life in South Carolina — Intrenchments 
begun — Frequent Glimpses into Secessia — The Belcidere ar- 
rives — Thanksgiving Day — Supplement 53 

DECEMBER, 1861. 

Tybee Examined — Flag of Truce — Heavy Details — Pinckney Island 
Foraged — Troops leaving Hilton Head — Brigade Band formed 

— Maj. Bedel reads President's Message from a barrel- — An 
Officer Resigns (first) — The Liquor Question — Stone Fleet 
Sunk ofi" Charleston — Sherman's Despatches to War Depart- 
ment — Christmas — Eclipse of Sun — Maj. Bedel leaves with 
Forty-seventh New York — Supplement 85 

(xxiii) 



CONTENTS. 



JANUARY, 1862. 



Page 



Skirmish at Port Royal Ferry — General Conrt-Martial ordered — A 
Recruiting Party goes North — Sweet Briar Pipes — New (blue) 
Uniforms — March to Seabrook — A Thief — A New York 
Officer Resigns — ^ General Viele scores him — A Balloon — 
Work in Intrenchments — A Board of Survey — Troops arrive 
and Troops leave Hilton Head — The first New Commission 
arrives — Capt. Donohoe, witli part of Co. C, detailed ^ — The 
Watch Fever — Supplement 95 

FEBRUARY, 1862. 

Drill, Dig ; Drill, Review — Mail — Glances into Secessia — Paid Oft" — 
The Chaplain sends large sums home for the men — Our 
Color-Bearer dies — Washington's Birthday — Troops and War 
Vessels leave Hilton Head — The Troops reorganized — 
Supplement 105 

MARCH, 1862. 

Express Despatch Boats established — Modes of Punishment for 
minor off"ences — The Liquor Question again — Frequent 
Deaths — Light Snow Storm — To Daufuskie — To Bird Island 

— The Savannah — ' ' Load ! " first time — Excitement — Return 
to Hilton Head — Capt. Carlton goes North on leave — "The 
New- South" born — St. Patrick's Day — To Bluft'ton — -Savage 
Island — Bull Island — Cattle Killing — Plunder generally — 
Regimental Picnic — Return to Hilton Head — The Chaplain 
appointed Postmaster — Supplement 115 

APRIL, 1862. 

All Fool's Day — Capt. Littlefield left — To Edisto — A Wearisome 
March -^ Picket Duty - — The Island in general — Negroes come 
in — Pulaski Taken — The Story of Pulaski — Capt. Wiggin 
and Adjt. Hill Resign — Reconnoissance to Jehossee Island — 
A comrade kills a comrade by accident — Col. Fellows goes on 
leave — Supplement 139' 

MAY, 1862. 

Death Sentence read on parade — Allotment Commission visit us — 
The Recruiting Party arrives from New Hampshire — Gen. 
Hunter Frees the Slaves — Promotions — The Planter — Sur- 
plus Baggage to the Landing — Troops to be Organized — Ready 
to Move — Supplement 151> 

JUNE, 1862. 

To John's Island — Promotions — Long and Tedious March — .Bivouac 

— Crossing John's Island — Legareville — To James Island — 
Rebels near — Sorties — Battle of Secessionville — The Dead 

— The Wounded — Battle Scenes and Incidents — Troops Re- 
organized — Guns Mounted — Capt. Dow Resigns — Preparing 

to Evacuate — Supplement 165 

JULY, 1862. 

Return to Hilton Head — Fourth of July — Hospital Life — The Com- 
panies Scattered to outposts — Outpost Duty — Capt. Donohoe 
and Lieut. Langley resign — Supplement 187 



CONTENTS. XXV 



AUGUST, 18G2. 



Page 



Outpost Duty continned — Rebel Ram expected — Three men of Co. 
11 desert — Sickness at Jenkins Island — Co. H Captured — 
Full Account of same — Regiment Concentrated — Baud to be 
Mustered Out — Lieut. Thompson Dies — Supplement . . 195 

SEPTEMBER, 1862. 

Gen. Hunter left Department — Quartermaster Nesmith goes on leave 

— Dr. Buzzell and Dr. Farrar arrive — Capt. Allen arrives with 
Recruits — Promotions — Gen. Mitchel arrives — Supplement . 211 

OCTOBER, 1862. 

Dr. Eaton leaves — Brigade Reorganized — Special Muster — Capt. 
Emmons and Lieut. Libby, Jr., obtain leaves — Negro Church 
Dedicated — Promotions — Cos. A and I rejoin Regtment from 
Provost Duty — Regimental Roster of Officers — To Pocotaligo 
and Return — The Fight there — Captured Blockade Runners 

— Yellow Fever — Gen. Mitchel and others die — Supplement . 219 

NOVEMBER, 1862. 

Battery Mitchel, near Seabrook — The Companies go there on Weekly 
Tours — Music at Funerals Forbidden —Fire Brigade Organ- 
ized at Hilton Head — Thanksgiving Day — Whiskey Regula- 
tions — Supplement 231 

DECEMBER, 1862. 

Lunt, of Ninth Maine, Shot for Desertion — Price of Clothing, etc. 

— Co. E to Pinckney Island and return — Troops of Banks' 
Expedition on Shore — Capt. Randlett obtains leave — Quar- 
termaster Nesmith discharged — The Monitor sunk — Sup- 
plement 237 

JANUARY, 1863. 

Lumber Expedition to Florida — New Meeting House — Expedition 
Unsuccessful — Gen. Hunter arrives — New Commissions arrive 

— Attempt to Regulate Sutlers — Snow Squall — Bayonet Exer- 
cise described — Rebel Rams attack Blockading Fleet oflF 
Charleston — Foster's Troops arrive in Harbor — Burnt Cork 
Talent — The Liquor Question — Regular Army deserter rec- 
ognized — "Fuss Souf" — Supplement 2-11 

FEBRUARY, 1863. 

Officers' Wives arrive — Capt. Wilbur's Sentence — Hilton Head 
almost acity — A Board to sit on Officers — That Regular Army 
Deserter — Six Companies to Pinckney Island — One Company 
to Pope's — One Company on Provost— Two Companies remain 

— Life on Pinckney Island — ]Maj. Plimpton goes on leave — 

' ' Get ready ! " — Packing Up — Packed and Ready — Supplement 249 

MARCH, 1863. 

Rebel Steamer Nashville captured — Unpacking — The new Second 
Brigade Band arrives — -Capt. Butterfield Discharged — Town 
Meeting — Short of Officers — Reconnoissance up May River — 
Boat Racing — St. Patrick's Day — A Serenade Band — Arrival 
of New Companies — Troops Departing — " Get Ready! " — All 
Packed Up — Supplement 257 



CONTENTS. 



APRIL, 1863. 



Page 



Packed Up aud Ready — More Troops arrive — Extra Rations issued 

— Accident to Capt. Allen — We Embark — Organization of 
Forces — The Regiment arrives at Stono Inlet — The Attack on 
Sumter by the Irou-clads — The Ironsides' Danger — Pres. Lin- 
coln's Private Secretary arrives — Regiment lands on Folly — 
Woodticks — Preparations to Stay — Embark again for Hilton 
Head — Wilful Appropriation of our "camp flxin's " — Again 
in Camp — Start again Charleston-vi'ard — Reorganization — 
Paid Ofl" — Lieut. Hopkins discliarged — Eight Companies land 
at Botany Bay Island — Two Companies finally land at Bay 
Point — Plundering Expeditions — Supplement .... 265 

MAY, 1863. 

Mail — Strawberries — Plunder — Clearing up "Camp Misery" — 
Furloughs — Capt. Maxwell and Lieut. Wadsworth go on leave 

— Sunday Plunder ■ — The Furloughed Men start for Home — 
Blackberries — Confederate Despatch — Commissions arrive 

— Pack Up again — Supplement 281 

JUNE, 1863. 

Again we Embark — Land at St. Helena Island^ The Two Com- 
panies Rejoin — Troops Concentrating at St. Helena Island — 
Drill, drill, drill ! — Confederate Despatch — Capt. Maxwell and 
Lieut. Wadsworth return from leave — Gen. Hunter relieved by 
Gen.'Gillmore — Admiral Dupont relieved by Admiral Dahlgren 

— St. Helena described — Capt. Wilbur's Dismissal Approved 

— The Rebel Ram Fingal captured — Gen. Geo. C. Strong 
arrives — Severe Thunder Storm — New Commissions arrive — 
Lieut. Smith resigns — The Furloughed Men return — Requa 
Battery — Small-pox — Getting Ready for New Move — Sup- 
plement 287 

JULY, 1863. 

Lieut. Libby goes on Leave — We Start Again for Charleston — Lieut. 
Flande^-s discharged — Land on Folly Island — Embark at 
Night for Morris — Mistake somewhere — The Troops in Boats 
rerurn — Again we take small boats at night — The Capture of 
lov.er end Morris Island — The Fight described — Casualties — 
Incidents — Attempt to take Wagner next morning — Earth- 
works — Fatigue duty — Hungry and Worn Out — Preparations 
to take Wagner — Second Assault (full particulars of same) 

— Casualties, etc. — Flags of Truce — A Detail starts North 
for Conscripts — Siege Operations — Lieuts. Akerman and 
Place discharged — The Regiment at the Fore-front — Sup- 
plement 295 

AUGUST, 1863. 

•Gillmore requests Rebels to stop shelling our Camp — Rebels ordered 
to put Spikes in Wagner's moat — Reinforcements from 
North Carolina — Capt. Payne, the Scout, captui'ed — Whiskey 
issued — Mounting a 300-pounder — How Col. Jackson was 
misrepresented — Long Roll — Calcium Light — Preparations 
for Extra Bombardment — The Rebels otter large sums to 
Sink Iron-clads — Sanitary Commission — Order of Exercises 
for 17th August — The " Swamp Angel" — A Peculiar Grain to 
be planted in front of Wagner — The 300-pounder opens — 
The Bricks fly — Impracticable Proposition to Capture Gen. 
Gillmore — The " Swamp Angel " bursts — The " Ridge " cap- 
tured — -Capt. Ayer wounded — Danger and Death at the Front 

— Sub terra shells — The Forces on Morris Island — Confeder- 
ate Letters from Fort Sumter — Supplement .... 345 



CONTEXTS. xxvii 

SEPTEMBER, 1863. P^g^ 

The Bombardment continues — The Sap rapidly approaching Wagner 

— Boat-load of Rebels Captured — The Beginning of the End — 
Last Days of the Siege — The Rebels Desperate — Preparations 
for Final and Desperate Assault — The Rebels Evacuate — Full 
Particulars of same — Torpedoes — The Parallels — "Swamp 
Angel" — Greek Fire — Sapping — Sap-i-oUers. Fascines, Gabi- 
ons, etc. — Requa Battery — Sand Bags — Dead Bodies — Few 
Days prior to Evacuation — Progress of the Sap — Last Days of 
Siege — Evacuation in Full — Defence of "Wagner — Siege Work 

— Statistical — Night attack on Sumter — Flags of Truce — Short 
of Officers — Provost Duty — High Tides — More Furloughs — 
Capts. Emraous and Handerson discharged — Capt. Ayer goes 
on leave — Gillmore a Major-General — A Soldier Dies Avith the 
Flag around him — Supplement 3G1 

OCTOBER, 1863. 

(The narrative form resumed) — Incendiary Shells — Two "Devils" 
arrive — Sharpshooters Disbanded — Torpedo versus Ironsides 

— Explosion in Wagner — Official Changes in Positions in line 

— Dr. Buzzell returns from leave — New Tniforms for Drum 
Corps — Medals to be given — Convalescent Camp established 

at St. Augustine — Supplement 399 

NOVEMBER, 1863. 

The Bombardment goes on — Sumter looks badly — Capt. Ayer returns 
from leave — He "knifes "his whole company — Two Ladies 
visit camp — More Furloughs — Liquid Fire — Long Roll — First 
lot "Subs" arrive — Capt. Clark and others rejoin — Col. (ex- 
Capt.) Donohoe with us — Troops reorganized — Thanksgiving 
Day — Supplement 405 

DECEMBER, 1863. 

A Salute for Victories — Col. Donohoe leaves us — The Weehavken 
sunk — Capt. Burnham discharged — Scarcity of Wood — Chap- 
lain Hill returns from leave — Wreckage — Torpedo Boat — 
Cos. A and C to Broad Island to cut wood — Recruiting Party 
sent North — Dr. Kimball returns — Cider from Dried Apples — 
Capt. Stearns rejoins — The Beacon House — Lieut. Libby, Jr., 
returns — Co. K to Broad Island — Supplement . . . 413 

JANUARY, 1864. 

Location of the Companies — Re-enlistments Begun — Gillmore author- 
ized to raise Colored Regiments — Col. Jackson returns — 
Recruits arrive — Ncav Commissions — Hotel Prices, Hilton 
Head — Broad Island — A Quiet Month — Supplement . . 419 

FEBRUARY, 1864. 

Blockade Runner Destroyed- — Furloughs Stopped — Long Roll — Re- 
enlisting continues — Rebel Torpedoes — Snow — Charleston and 
Shells — Regiment to be Mounted — Ordered to Hilton Head — 
Cos. A, C and K — Embark again — Supplement . . . 427 

MARCH, 1864. 

Camp for Cavalry — The Re enlisted Men go Home — Infantry versus 
Cavalry — The Horses Selected — The Chaplain assists in select- 
ing — A Confusion of Horses — Cavalry Drill — Bugles versus 
Drums — Spencer Riffes — Rebel Spy at Hilton Head — Paid Oft" 
^ — Move Camp — The Rebel, Finegan — Lieut. Head discharged 

— Supplement . . . . • 433 



xxviii CONTENTS. 

APRIL, 1864. Page 

Ordered to Florida — Embarkation — The Fleet leaves for Florida — 
Jacksonville reached — Camp outside the city — Four Compa- 
nies sent to Palatka — They go Ovei'land and soon return — 
Several Substitutes desert — A fev^^ Caught — Drum Head Court- 
martial — One Man Shot — Less Desertions — ^ Steamer Blown 
Up — Ordered to Virginia — Turn in our Horses — Embark 
for Hilton Head — Part with Worn-out Equipage — Change 
Steamers — Sail North to Virginia — Arrive oft' Yorktown 

— Land at Gloucester Point • — Meet our Re-enlisted Men — A Re- 
united Regiment — As Infantry once more — Supplement . 443 

MAY, 1864. 
Getting Ready for Active Duty — Embark to go up James River — 
Land at Bermuda Hundred — The enemy close at hand — 
Skirmishes — Reconnoissance — The Drewry's Bluff" Battle — 
Scenes — Incidents — Casualties — Movements of Troops — Quo- 
tations from Accounts of Both Sides — Return to Camp — Bogus 
Proclamation — Frequent Fights — Artillery Duels — Move Camp 

— Troops sent to North of the James — Supplement . . . 459 

JUNE, 1864. 
Rebel Sortie — They Capture part of Picket Line — Federal Sortie — 
They Retake the Picket Line — -Both Sorties result in Pris- 
oners — Flag of Truce — The One Hundred Days' Men arrive 

— They are Funny Fellows — A Small Force to near Petersburg 

— Return same day — Expedition Fruitless — Butler censures 
Gillmore — The Rebels Evacuate our Front — We go out to 
find them — We find each other — A fight — We fall back — 
They Reoccupy their Former Line — A Glance at South Caro- 
lina — We go down the River — Dust, Dust, Dust — Return 
same day — Troops Reorganized — The Serenade Band ex- 
humed — Supplement 489 

JULY, 1864. 
Transportation Reduced — A Peep into the Department of the South 

— A Fourth of July Salute — Whiskey again Permitted — 
Attempt to Exchange Papers — Three days Picket Duty — The 
Tour described— Corps Badge designated — The Petersburg 
Mine mentioned — Supplement 509 

AUGUST, 1864. 
Exchange in South Carolina — Terms soon to expire — When will the 
1861 men be mustered out? — Will the Regiment lose its Iden- 
tity? — Volunteers called for "to dig and remove earth " — A 
Twenty-fourth Massachusetts man executed — The Second Brig- 
ade Band to be recruited — A Ride to Petersburg — Active 
Operations again — March to Pontoon • — Cross the James River 

— Many Sunstruck — Fighting — Casualties — Incidents of the 
Battle — The Wounded — Burial of the Dead — Many Ofticers 
Wounded — The Wounded Gathered under Trees — Transported 
down river to Hospitals — Official Report — Marching and Skir- 
mishing — Crossing a Pontoon described — Arrive back to Camp 

— The "Muster-out of the 1861 Men — Festivities —They go 
home — Regiment ott'for Petersburg — New Experiences in New 
Camp — Supplement 515 

SEPTEMBER, 18G4. 
In Front of Petersbarg — A Bomb-proof built — Const.ant Alarms — 
Near the Enemy — A Sixth Connecticut man drummed out — A 
Sutler arrives — "Petersburg Express" — Capt. Dow goes 
North for Recruits — Dr. Burnham Discharged — Active Ser- 
vice again — The Regiment starts — Fighting again — Ofticial ^ 
Report — Supplement 533 



CONTENTS. xxix 



OCTOBER, 1864. 



Page 



War Alarms — Again Engaged — Wet, Wet, Wet ! — The Sutler arrives 

— More Fighting — Official Report — Paid Oft' — Again in Action 

— Official Report — Works thrown up — " Picking them out " — 
Snow Squall — A Tilt with the I<>nemy — Official Report — Rest- 
ing — Supplement 541 



NOVEMBER, 1804. 

At the Front and Quiet — Regiment to go to New York City — Arrive 
New York Harbor — Land at Fort Richmond — Near but far 
(from comfort) — The Ballot to be Protected — Butler's Orders 
— Presidential Election — Lincoln versus McClellan — Border 
Incursions planned — The P^lection in New York quiet — We 
Return to Virginia — Thanksgiving Pay — Turkeys, etc., ar- 
rive next day — But they were good — Logging for Material 
to Build — A Peep into the Department of the South — New 
Drums — Supplement 555 



DECEMBER. 1864. 

Erecting Houses — Tenth and Eighteenth Corps Discontinued — Tenth 
Corps forms part of the ncAv Twenty-fourth Corps — Butler 
Forbids Officers BorroAving Money from Men — Again on the 
Move, — A live Rebel captured — Flying trip to Department of 
the South — Sherman's Forerunners — Fort McAllister Suc- 
cumbs— Sherman Arrives at Port Royal — First Expedition to 
Fort Fisher starts — Deserter Caught — A Shooting Match and 
a Dead Man — Lieut. -Col. Randlett goes North — He takes 
Lieut. -Col. Plimpton's body with him — Christmas — New 
Hampshire State Officers visit Regiment — Savannah Fallen — 
The Fort Fisher Expedition returns, unsuccessful — Supple- 
ment 565 



JANUARY, 1865. 

New Year's Day — Recruits — Regiment (a part of) to go to Fort 
Fisher — Oft' for the Fray — Embarkation— Storm and Wind — 
Delays — Finally arrive off Fort Fisher — The Fleet — The 
Landing — The Assault— The Fort itself — The First Expe- 
dition brietly described — The Powder Boat Explosion — Fort 
Fisher Captured — Official Reports — Scenes and Incidents — 
Almost Hand-to-Hand Conflict — Difi'erent Accounts of the 
Battle — Butler Relieved — The Explosion — Forward toward 
Wilmington — Another Engagement — Supplement . . . 573 



FEBRUARY, 1865. 

Col. Bedel Expected — Lieut. Hitchcock Returns from Ncav York — 
Rumors of Peace — Schofleld's Corps arrives — Again we 
Engage the Enemy — Several Prisoners taken by Third New 
Hampshire — Capt. Trickey's Report — Other Movements in 
Contemplation — A Storm Delays Matters — The Boys we left 
in Virginia arrive — Arming the New Arrivals — Charleston 
Evacuated — Fort Anderson on Cape Fear River Bombarded — 



CONTENTS. 



FEBRUARY, 18(55, Continued. 



Page 



The Troops move Forward Again — Wilmington Captured — 
Detailed Account of same — Tom Entwistle's Greeting — His 
Story of Capture, Imprisonment and Escape — A Bridge Saved 
from Burning — A Pontoon Captured and used — Ten Thousand 
Prisoners Paroled by the Rebels — Several Third Ncav Hamp- 
shire among the number — Supplement G29 

MARCH, 1865. 

Six Hundred Cnion Officers arrive, Exchanged — Our own Varnum H. 
Hill of the number — " Sherman's March to the Sea" heard — 
We go to Wilmington — Lieut. -Col. Randlett appointed Provost 
Marshal — Recruits Arrive — The Twenty-third Army Corps 
leave Wilmington — A Theatre — Provisions for Sherman — 
Firing in the Distance — Large Fire in Wilmington — Sick and 
Wounded go North — Dr. Buzzell dies — Supplement . . 645 

APRIL, 1865. 

Rebel Rations — Troops Arrive from Hilton Head — Paid for Four 
Months — The Usual Result- — News arrives of Fall of Rich- 
mond — Regiment on Duty in Small Squads — Col. Bedel and 
Lieut. Atherton arrive — The Restoration of the Flag to Sumter 

— The President Assassinated — Citizens of Wilmington hold 
Mass Meeting — Attorney-General's Opinion — Supplement . 651 

MAY, 1865. 

Short of Officers — The End Nearing — Worn-out Property turned in 

— Our Drummers Compete for Prize — Certain Officers and 
Men to be Mustered Out at once — More Furloughs — Prepara- 
tions for Muster-out — Camp at Concord, N. H., ordered to be 
ready to receive Returning Troops — Regiment Decimated and 
Divided — Supplement 658 

JUNE, 1865. 

Certain Men to be Mustered Out — Secretary of Navy arrives — Joke 
about him — Regiment ordered to Goldsboro' — Goldsboro's 
Sanitary Condition — Capt. Donley appointed Provost Marshal 

— More Preparations for Muster-out — Whiskey Disappears — 
Reduced to Ranks — Parade and Drills — The Recruits of 1862 
Mustered Out — Masonic Festival and Dinner — Extra Baggage 
arrives from Norfolk — Lieut. -Col. Randlett Rejoins — Supple- 
ment 663 

JULY, 1865. 

An Amputation — Fire and Riot at Goldsboro' — Fourth of July — 
Capt. Edgerly Rejoins — Battalion Drill ordered — The End 
rapidly Approaching — Final Rolls being made — A Circus 
arrives — Capt. White Rejoins — Mnatered Out ! — A Lost Tent 

— Start for Concord — Details of the Homeward Trip — Recep- 
tion at Concord — The Returning Regiment Described — Pay- 
master not ready to settle — Nominal Furloughs . . . 669 

AUGUST, 1865. 

The Regiment Reassembled at Concord — Paid Off by Maj. C. 0. 

Benedict — Good-bye, Comrades ! 677 



CONTENTS. 

Biographical Sketches .... 
Soldiers' Homes (National, U. S. and State) 

Kegimextal Roster 

Enlistments Less than Three Years 
Tables (Wounded, Died of Wounds, etc.) . 

Officers' Data 

Wars of the United States 
Soldiers' Homes (Tliird New Hampsliire Men in 
Military Societies of the United States 
Appendix A (Miscellaneous Subjects) 
Appendix B (Trials, Desertions and Executions) 
Statistical (from " Fox's Regimental Losses") 
Appendix C (New Hampshire Matters) 
Battles, List of ... . . . 

Regimental Summary 

Index 



Page 


679-795 


796 


797-888 


888 


889-961 


961-963 


963 


96-1-967 


968 


969-1026 


027-1036 


1036 


037-10-15 


1046 


1047 


1049 




WOMAN'S RELIEF CORPS BADGE. 



1861 











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18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 









25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


31 


MARCH 












1 


^ 




















3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


SEPT. . 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




31 
















29 


30 












APRIL . 




1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


OCT... 


.... 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 






8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






MAY... 








1 

8 


2 
9 


3 

10 


4 
11 


NOV. .. 












1 
8 


2 

9 




5 


6 


7 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


JUNE 














1 
8 




















2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




DEC. .. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




30 
















29 


30 


31 































THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



AUGUST, 1861, 

AND PRIOR. 




P2F0KE bringing the reader face to face with the Third 
New Hampshire, the writer deems it best to go back a 
little in history, and lead the reader by easy gradations 
up to the time when the Third New Hampshire was 
organized, then organize the regiment, putting it into 
proper shape for introduction : and thus perhaps prevent the 
reader having possible convulsions at the sudden presenta- 
tion of so formidable a body as a regiment of infantry. To 
do this — to go backward — does not necessitate that the causes of the 
war shall be discussed or explained. Books, newspapers, magazines 
and libraries teem with all that sort of reading, and are accessible to 
almost everybody. It was a great query in the writer's mind as to 
the exact point or date to begin at ; but in searching for it he found 
many other matters of great interest, and at last struck the point 
desired : and here is the first speck of war found by him : — 

A SPECK OF WAR AT HOME. 
[MiUtari/ Gazette, New York, 15 Nov. I860.] 
.... There is a note of preparation against some foe in our own bor- 
ders. The Southern States are actuallj' organizing and arming their militia. 
And for what reason? Against their own brothers, and against no others, 
can their weapons be wi-elded. God forbid that things have come to such 
a pass ! We hope prudent and wise counsels will prevail, that men iriU stop 
to count the cost and value of this Union, and that unneighborly violence 

win cease on every hand How shall we decide? We cannot, we 

shall not ! God will not permit this great experiment in the government to 
be frustrated just as its fruits begin to cheer benighted Italy and down- 
trodden Hungary. 

This " speck" was found in what appeared to be the only mili- 
tary magazine in the country at the time, and was principally devoted 
to the militia of the vState of New York. Having found this •' speck," 
the writer traced the magazine along for further development ; and 
here is the very next : — 



2 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aay. '61. 

WAR PREPAKATIONS. 

^Military Ilagazhie, New York, 15 Dec. I860.] 

The attention of Avhom it maj' concern is called to the accompanying 
advertisement in the Herald, which Ave have not been requested to copy: — 

"Attention! Tlie captains of all volunteer companies in the city of 
New York .... communicate with the undersigned at No. 74 Mott street, 
.... for purpose of perfecting a military organization to protect the 
municipal rights of the city and the Constitutional rights of the citizens of 
the country, in the event of a revolution in the country 

New York, 10 Dec. 18G0. James C. Kerrigan." 

What does this mean? Is this an attempt to hasten revolution .... 
we may look out for the worst. It will do no harm to be prepared. 

All this occurred soon after the election of Lincoln, and was sub- 
stantially in accordance with what had been predicted. 

The writer asks j^our kind indulgence while he goes backward 
again and gives j^ou another "pointer." Moore's Rebellion Record^ 
Vol. VIII., page 598, gives the following as being the copy of a cir- 
cular found in Hnntsville, Alabama, on the 19th of April, 1864, and 
calls it the " Secret Rebel Circular" : — 

EXECI'TIVE CHAMBER, "THE 1860 ASSOCIATION." 

Charleston, S. C, 10 Nov. 1860. 
In September last several gentlemen of Charleston met to confer in 
reference to the position of the South in the event of the accession of Mr. 
Lincoln and the Republican party to power. This informal meeting was the 
origin of the organization known in this community as the " 18G0 Asso- 
ciation." 

1. To conduct a correspondence .... and prepare the slave States 
to meet the impending crisis. 

2. To prepare, print and distribute in the slave States, tracts, 
etc 

3. To inquire into the defences of the State .... one hundred and 
sixty-six thousand pamphlets have been published .... 

The 1860 Association is laboring for the South, and asks your aid 
... " Robert N. Gourdin, 

Gh. Ex. Com. 

The writer has no comment upon the above, except to say that 
finding it in a respectable and popular work on the war, he deems it 
not a figment of fancy. We pass hastily over the intervening 
months of intense anxiety and alarm, the secession of States and 
the inauguration of Lincoln, pausing only to give an item of 
"preparation." Before the close of 1860, Fortress Monroe, then 
popularly called the Fortress of the Union, was renovated and made 
'ready for what might be expected; but as to who gave the orders 
for this renovation, or what motives were behind the order, is an 
open question and not for the writer to even express an opinion 
upon. When the renovations were completed, the fort had about 
290 guns. The Rip Raps were also put in condition, and then had 
108 8-inch Columbiads, 52 13-pounder guns, all in casemate, and 
46 9-inch Columbiads, enharbette. 

We are now practically at the opening of the war, at Fort 
Sumter; and what Third New Hampshire man will not feel some- 



Aurf. '61.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



what excited at the thought of Fort Sumter? This being the case, 
considerable space will be given to it and its war record. The 
opening gun has been treated elsewhere, and also the first sand 




FORT SUMTER IX 



battery, on Morris Island, that fired at the Harriet Lane. Much 
has been said and written as to Major Anderson's surrender of the 
fort — some in praise, much in censure. Facts are \QYy mulish. 
The following is a copy of 



ANDERSON S INSTRUCTIONS. 

You are carefully to avoid every 
act wliich would needlessly tend to 
provoke aggression : and for that rea- 
son you are not, without necessity, to 
take up any position which Avould be 
construed into the assumption of a 
hostile attitude. But you are to hold 
possession of the forts in the harbor, 
and if attacked, you are to defend 
yourself to the last extremity. The 
smallness of your force will not per- 
mit you, perhaps, to occupy more than 
one of the three forts ; but an attack 
on, or an attempt to take possession 
of either of them, will be regarded as 
an act of hostility, and you may put your command into either of them 
which you deem most proper to increase its power of resistance. 




ROBERT ANDERSON. 



4 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aug. '61. 

You are also authorized to take similar steps, whenever you have 
tangible evidence of a design to proceed to a hostile act. 

D. P. BUTLEK, 

Fort Moultrie, S. C, 11 Dec. 1860. Assistant Adjutant-General. 

This is in conformity with my instructions to Major Buell. 

John B. Floyd, 

Secretary of War. 

Note. — It is said that when Major Anderson surrendered the fort, 
the flag was cut up in small pieces and distributed to the garrison ; and that 
afterward, at a night attack on the fort by the Federals, a flag was cap- 
tured from the latter, which the rebels claim was the identical flag which 
had floated over Fort Sumter originally. This is de'nied. (See Army and 
Xavy Journal, 28 Nov., 5 Dec, 1863.) 



The call had been made for troops. New Hampshire responded 
by her First Regiment. And here seems to be the place to briefly 
state that this was a three-month's regiment ; and its history, con- 
densed, is as follows : — 

THP] FIRST NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

THREE MONTHS. 

The regiment encamped at (near) Concord, on the easterly side 
of the Merrimack river, on what was termed "The Plains," say a 
mile from the city. The regiment left Concord for the front 25 
May 1861, and returned to Concord 5 Aug. 1861. The casualties 
were : — 

Discharged before leaving Concord 3 

for disability 13 

" by general court-martial 2 

Died . . . 7 4 

Captured 5 

Transferred to Second New Hampshire Volunteers . 1 
Deserted 7 

Total 35 

The First Regiment was officially received and welcomed 8 Aug. 
1861, by public demonstration, procession, etc. 

THE SECOND NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

THREE MONTHS VS. THREE YEARS. 

This regiment was originally designed for three mouths' service ; 
but during its formation, it was changed to a three years' regiment. 
It was quartered at Portsmouth, in the old " rope- walk," or "bar- 
racks," at the southerly end of the city. The mustering-in began 
31 May 1861, aud extended over several days, ending 8 June 1861. 
The regiment left Portsmouth for seat of war 22 June 1861, via 
Eastern Railroad to Boston, where a dinner was given them in 
Faneuil Hall. Their further history is accessible. 

The reader is now rapidly nearing the Third New Hampshire, 
and naturally becoming a little nervous lest he be suddenly con- 
fronted with it; — but wait a little. The regiment is incubating, 



Auf/. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 5 

and in different parts of the State. The writer has now to see that 
all the various parts are successfully brought to life and safely 
conducted by squads to the rendezvous, and there skillfully and 
lawfully converted into a regiment, whose brief designation is 



"THE THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE." 

The camping place selected was on the easterly side of the 
Merrimack River, on the side farthest from and opposite the city of 
Concord, and quite near the bank of the river, on the "intervals," 
almost as level as a floor, and a beautiful spot, conveniently near 
the city. This camp existed several days without a name. Whether 
it suffered in consequence is a moot question. On the 11th of 
August a letter was dated thus : " Camp without a name," and says, 
" I was ordered into camp with my men on the 8th. — Ayer ! " 

Of the arrivals in camp and assignment to companies, the 
writer examined the bills paid by the State for service, at $13 a 
month, from date of enlistment to date of arrival at rendezvous. 

Co. D.ite of Arrival — Squads. Amount. 

A . . August 13 $ -410.95 

B . . " 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, U, 17, 23 . 471.30 

C . . " 8, 10, 11, 13, U, 19, 20, 21 . 461.41 

D . . " 16, 19, 21 1,183.86 

E . . " 8, 10, 12, 15, 16, 19 ... . 419.53 

E . . " 7, 8, 15, 19, 20, 22, 26 . . 386.21 

G . . " 20, 21 561.30 

H . . " 13, 20, 21, 22, 24, 25 .... 541.82 

I . . " 20, 21, 23, 26 431.24 

K . . " 20, 23 642.09 

Baud . - 26 296.42 

Total $5,806.13 

Note 1. — The pay of Co. D was for about two mouths' time. (See 
Co. D.) 

Note 2. — August 7, for Co. F, is a mistake on the records. 



THE TEN-DOLLAR STATE BOUNTY. 

This was a sort of gratuity, as the sum was so small it hardly 
deserved the dignified name of bounty. Later on, a bounty meant 
perhaps a thousand dollars. This ten-dollar bounty was distributed 
as follows : — 

Co. A $1,010 Co. G $ 970 

B 1,000 H 1,010 

C 1,010 I 950 

D 950 K 1,000 

E 980 Band 250 

F 1,010 C. S. and Q. M. S. . . . 20 

Total 810,160 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aug. '61. 

The authority for this disbursement was as follows : — 

State of New Hampshire, 

Executive Department, 
General Order No. 2 : Concord, 31 July 1861. 

It is hereby ordered that a bounty of ten dollars ($10.00) be paid to 
each man who lias enlisted or who may hereafter enlist into the Third 
Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers, or any other regiment or company, 
and who may be accepted and mustered into the service of the United 
States. Nathaniel S. Berry, 

Anthony Colby, Governor. 

Adjutant-General. 

The vote of the Council authorizing the. above was 30th of July, 
1861. 

The writer has unwittingly been "arriving" his men at rendez- 
vous and paying them bounty ; but not a word about their board 
bills, which were S2.50 per week at the place of enlistment. The 
bills for the same, upon examination, appear incomplete, in this : 
that no bills appear for Companies A and C, though it may be fair 
to infer by their absence and a knowledge of certain facts that no 
board bill was incurred by those companies, they both being military 
organiz-ations (or partly so) , and probably did not leave their homes 
till the day of departure for Concord. The board bills found 
amount to over $2,500. 

The railroad fares, stage fares, meals en route, the two dollars 
premium for each man recruited, etc., etc., must all be passed 
quickly over. The railroad charged two cents per mile. One spe- 
cial train from Concord to New Market Junction, 10 Aug. 1861, cost 
$154.90. The heaviest bills for the carrying of men were on the 
Concord & Portsmouth Railroad : one for $510 from New Market 
Junction, and another for $393 from Portsmouth ; the whole bill of 
the Concord & Portsmouth Railroad being $923.28. This bill proba- 
bly covered men of other regiments, say Second New Hampshire, 
and charged Third New Hampshire by mistake. 



Having " arrived" the material for a regiment, let us see where 
they came from and what they were ; and we '11 take them by 
companies. 

COMPANY A. 

This company was partly composed of men from the Abbott 
Guard, a prominent military company of Manchester. ' Capt. Clark 
advertised in the Manchester Mirror of the 10th of August for 
recruits to fill up the Abbott Guard. Nearly every man in the 
company was recruited by Capt. Clark, in Manchester and its 
immediate vicinit}'. The company left Manchester for Concord the 
13th of August, being filled to 101 that day and being tempora- 
rily designated as the "Second company of the Abbott Guard." 
They left on the afternoon train, were met at Concord by Co. C 
(previously arrived; see Co. C), Capt. Uonohoe, and escorted to 
the State House, where Capt. Clark reported to the Governor, and 
thence to camp. 



Aurj. '61.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 7 

This is the only company reported in this history arriving on 
one date, meaning that the company was full. 

Being a military company and its commander possessing what 
is called a " military presence," the company made its mark at once. 
Again, its First Sergeant had been in the Regular Army, and his 
services in many ways were in great demand. 

In the company were several prmters, who severed their pleasant 
and lucrative connections with the home press to take the sword. 
These printers were very useful in setting up the type and forms 
for the first and early editions of The Xew South, at Hilton Head. 
These printers proved valuable correspondents, and their letters 
from the seat of war were read with interest at home. They 
reached position and distinction ; and of this they will be treated 
in the appropriate place. 

Companies A and E were at first the skirmish companies, being 
left and right companies in the line. 



COMPANY B. 

This company was recruited almost wholly at Exeter and New 
Market, chiefly by Capt. Wilbur and Lieut. Fogg. 

The records show that the arrivals for this company occurred 
on eight different days (8th to 23d August). The company was 
somewhat unfortunate in its choice of Captain, as he was arrested at 
Hilton Head before we had seen much service, remained in arrest a 
long time, and was finally dishonorably discharged after trial. This 
untoward circumstance had a depressing effect upon the company 
itself, though by no means impairing its efficiency. 



COMPANY C. 

This company was almost wholly composed of Irishmen, and 
was recruited by Capt. Michael T. Donohoe and Lieut. Robert 
H. Allen, and nearly every man was from Manchester or its 
immediate vicinity. 

The company went to Concord on the afternoon of the -Sth of 
August, with about 25 men. On the 10th, Lieut. R. H. Allen 
advertised in the Manchester Mirror for recruits to fill up Capt. 
Donohoe's company, and offered SlOO in money and 160 acres land 
when discharged. 

The arrivals for this company covered eight different dates ; 
and it is fair to presume that Irishmen were selected for it as 
they arrived. It seems superfluous to state that this company was a 
fighting company. 

COMPANY D. 
This company was recruited at Portsmouth and vicinity. As 
the location would indicate, the company had a large number of 
excellent boatmen ; and wherever and whenever such service w^as 
desired, Co. D o-ot the contract. 



8 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. [Aug. '61. 

As it has a particularly interesting history, it was deemed wise 
to have one specially prepared by a person entirely familiar with the 
matter, as follows : — 

Aug. 19, 1861, Capt. Charles F. Dunbar of Hampton, N. H., 
with his command, which consisted of two officers besides himself 
and forty-six men, reported at Camp Berry, Concord, N. H., for 
duty. They were known as the ' ' Winnacunnet Guards " of Hampton, 
who had offered their services to the Governor, in April, for three 
months, re-enlisted for three years in May, and had been stationed 
at Fort Constitution, Newcastle, N. H. They were the nucleus of 
Co. D. To them was added Lieut. Wm. H. Cornelius ' and 
thirty men from Portsmouth and vicinity, ten who had been 
enlisted at Seabrook by Titcomb, four Avho had enlisted at Bristol, 
and two who had been enlisted at Great Falls by G. W. Towle. 
This combination threw out Dunbar's Second Lieutenant, Amos J. 
Towle; and his First Sergeant, J. Warren Dow, was rejected for 
phj^sical disability ; but his number was made good by the enlist- 
ment of two belonging in Hampton. Four others also enlisted at 
Concord, one of whom (Daniel E. Plummer) was discharged by 
order of Court, being a minor. 

The direction of affairs remained with Capt. Dunbar and his 
men ; but after the first year of service the spirit of discontent and 
uneasiness which existed in many companies had disappeared from 
D, and it is a question if there was anything but the closest of 
brotherly love, and all felt that belonging to Co. D meant some- 
thing. 

The company was mustered into the United States service for 
three years, unless sooner discharged, Friday, Aug. 23, 1861, at 
Concord, N. H., by Maj. Seth Eastman, U. S. A. Sept. 3, 1861, 
the regiment left Concord, N. H., for the seat of war. Three men, 
(Sergt. Ezekiel C. Rand, Privates John H. Eaton and Wm. 
Horton) failed to report from furlough, and were afterwards dropped 
as deserters. Coming mostly from the sea-coast of New Hampshire, 
the greater part of them were accustomed to the ocean and at home 
with a boat and an oar. They were often detailed to do boat duty, 
and not a few of them were engaged in pulling an oar when the 
troops disembarked at Hilton Head, S. C, in November, 1861. 
Two of them ran a despatch boat from Hilton Head, S. C, to 
St. Helena Sound, S. C, in 1862, and the majority of General 
Gilmore's famous boat crew were D men. Their early practice and 
drill made them one of the best companies in the regiment. 

Their position was third in line, until re-arrangement in 
October, 1863, when they were made the left company, and con- 
tinued as such until expiration of term of service. As the flank com- 
panies were armed with Spencer repeating carbines before the rest 
of the regiment, they were often called upon for special duty. May 
13, 1864, they led the successful assault upon the enemy's right and 
rear at Drewry's Bluff, Va., where their loss of killed and wounded 
was greater than that of any other company. Of the 100 men 
upon the roll Sept. 3, 1861, the average age was 23 1-6 years; 
48 were 21 years and under; 75 (or three-quarters of the company) 



Anrj. '61.^ THIKD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 9 

25 years and under; 17 were between 26 and 30 years, including 
both dates ; 8 were over thirty years ; and only one man over 40 
years of age. After the resignation of Capt. Dunbar, Lieut. 
Wm. H. Maxwell of Co. H was commissioned as Captain of 
D, and remained in that capacity until his discharge. 

Of the original company : Of the sergeants, one received a 
commission, two were discharged for disability, one killed in action, 
and the fifth never left Concord, N. H. ; of the corporals, five 
became sergeants (two receiving commissions), three were wounded 
(two dying from wounds), two were discharged for disability, one 
was taken prisoner of war, and one made wagoner ; the Wagoner was 
promoted to Regimental Quartermaster's Sergeant, and was after- 
wards commissioned ; a sergeant-major was appointed from the 
company, and was also commissioned, as well as another who was 
originally an enlisted man : making six members of the company 
who received commissions. There were issued in all, eighteen 
sergeant's and twenty-six corporal's warrants. Originally without 
musicians, two recruits, received May, 1862, were assigned as such. 
Thirty men re-enlisted in the regiment in 1864. Only one of the offi- 
cers was in service three years — Orreu M. Dearborn, and he was on 
detached duty, in the field, a greater portion of the time. 

THE COMPANY 

Consisted, Aug. 30, 1861, of 3 officers and 98 enlisted men. 
34 Discharged for disability. 

7 Died from disease. 

1 Died wliile a prisoner of war. 

8 Killed in action. 

1 Missed in action. 

G Died from wounds. 

3 Dropped as deserters (failed to leave Concord, N.H.) 

2 Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

1 Discharged by order of Court, at Concord, N.H. (a minor). 

1 Resigned. 

18 Discharged, expiration term of service, Aug. 23, ISG-t. 

1 " " " " ■ Oct. 19, 1864. 
IS " " " " July 20, 1865. 

101 Total. 
Re-enlisted, 30; captured, 4; wounded, 22; wounded twice, 5. 

RECKUITS. 

Joined company in 1862, 4 ; in 1863, 32 ; in 1864, 2 ; total, 38. 

2 Discharged by special orders from Department of No. Carolina. 

5 Discharged for disability. 

10 Discharged at expiration term of service, July 20, 1865. 

6 Killed in action. 

1 Died of wounds. 

2 Died in rebel prisons. 
1 Missed in action. 

1 Drowned. 

2 Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

4 Deserted. 

5 No discharges furnished : absent (sick) when regiment mus- 
tered out. 

38 Total. 
Captured, 5 ; Avounded, 12 ; Avounded twice, 1 ; I'e-enlisted, 2 ; received 
promotion, 1. 



10 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aug. '61. 



3 original officers, 98 original enlisted men, 38 recruits. 

39 Dischariied for disability. 

7 Died from disease. 

3 Died while prisoners of war. 

13 Killed in action. 32 Re-enlisted. 

2 Missed in action. 9 Captured." 
7 Died from wounds. 34 Wounded. 

1 Drowned. 10 Wounded more than once. 

3 Dropped as deserters (failed to leave Concord, N.H., Sept. 

3, 1861). 

4 Deserters. 

•1 Transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps. 

1 Discharged by order of Court, at Concord, N.H., Aug. 31, 1861. 

2 Discharged by special order Department of North Carolina. 
1 Resigned. 

5 No discharges furnished: absent (sick) when regiment mus- 

tered out. 
18 Discharged expiration term of service. Aug. 23, 18G4. 
1 " " " " Oct. 19, 1864. 

28 " " " " July 20, 1865. 

139 Total. 

WM. LADD DODGE (1888). 

COMPANY E. 

The nucleus of this company was said to have been recruited at 
Milford, mostly by Norman Burdick of Milford, though several were 
recruited by Capt. Plimpton (say 32) ; and H. C. Tuttle was paid 
for recruiting 50 men. 

The men were largely from Milford ; but the towns of Rindge, 
Mason, Dublin and others in immediate vicinity furnished a few each. 
Fifty men arrived at camp August 8, and 32 more on the 15th. The 
company was then filled up with small squads arriving at various 
dates. 

Companies E and A were the skirmish companies. (See Co. A. ) 

COMPANY F. 
This company was almost wholly recruited at Nashua, by Capt. 
Randlett, who recruited 90 men ; and the balance were recruited at 
Claremout by Eli C. Marsh. Capt. Randlett and his recruits ar- 
rived at Concord August 16, and Eli C. Marsh arrived on the 19th 
with 24 men. The Manchester Jlirror says Randlett had 81 men. 
This would leave a surplus, and these were put in some other com- 
pany. Randlett drilled his men at Nashua, in the old Armory in 
the City Hall building. 

COMPANY G. 

This company was largely recruited by Capt. Wiggiu, of Ossi- 
pee, who induced 60 men to enlist. At Lancaster, H. O. Kent ob- 
tained 22 men. At Tamworth and other towns, Oliver P. Newcomb 
obtained 15 men. The first two squads arrived at Concord the 20th, 
aud the latter squad the 21st August. This Company was called, 
later on, "The Ossipee Zoo-Zoos." 



Anr/. '01.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. H 

COMPANY H. 

This company was almost wholly recruited in Manchester, by 
Capt. Robert C. Dow ; and the basis was the military company called 
the " Amoskeag Rifles." Capt. Dow advertised in the 3fanchester 
Mirror oi the 9th of August, for recruits for the " Amoskeag Rifles," 
at SI bounty. 

The record shows he recruited 88 men. They went to Concord 
in the forenoon of August 20, and were escorted to the depot by the 
" State Guards." 

COMPANY I. 

This company was recruited largely by Fred. A. Barker, at and 
near Keene, Fitzwilliam, Richmond and surrounding towns. 

Mr. Barker is credited with recruiting 45 men. 

Capt. Ralph Carlton recruited 27 men at Rochester, Farmington 
and vicinity. 

Henry W. Locke stands credited for 20 men. 

Henry S. Dow is credited for 5 men recruited by him. 

Locke's squad arrived the 20th, and Barker's squad the 21st, 
while Dow's squad arrived the 15th. Capt. Carlton's squad arrived 
on the 21st. 

This Company later on was called " The Lamb-like I's." Cause 
unknown. 

COMPANY K. 

This company was recruited almost wholly at Dover, by Ira A. 
Moody, a citizen of that city. Nearly every man was of Dover or 
its vicinity. Capt. Littlefield and Lieut. Butterfield both assisted 
Mr. Moody and both drilled the men. Lieut. Miles (2d Lieut.) took 
no active part. Capt. Littlefield had served in the Mexican AVar 
(see personal sketch of him) , and was also in the State Militia. 

The records give credit to Geo. W. Towle for 16 men, and to 
J. R. Bagley for 10 men; and the}' arrived at Concord before the 
main body of the company, namely: the 16 on the 22d, and the 10 
on the 20th. 

A squad of 7 from Lebanon (the writer was one) arrived the 
19th, and were at first put into a blank company, next into Co. 
D, and finally into the Dover company on its arrival. 

REMARKS ON THE COMPANIES. 
The work of equalizing the companies and adjusting all the mat- 
ters pertaining to a regimental organization, causing more or less 
confusion while in process, covered the time almost up to point of 
leaving for seat of war. 

THE BAND. 

All recruited by the leader, Gustavus W. Ingalls, and arriving 
on the 26th. 

Having "arrived" the men, and adjusted them to and' by com- 
panies, they are now ready for muster-in by companies. This was 
done at the State House by a Regular Army officer, — Maj. Seth 
Eastman, Fifth U. S. Infantry. We were marched over by com- 



12 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aw/. '61. 

panics (say two or more companies in one day) ; and there we sol- 
emnly and severally swore, etc., and marched back to camp, feeling 
that we had outgrown the little State of New Hampshire, and noth- 
ing short of the United States as a whole would fit us. At the mus- 
ter each was obliged to successively take a step to the front, rapidly 
move about his legs and arms (to show he was not crippled), and 
then hold up his right hand to take the oath. 

It would seem at first sight that this was the proper point to in- 
troduce the regiment to the reader; but wait a little, — just a little 
longer, — till the regiment is in shape to be introduced. The month 
of August, 1861, was full of interest to the Third New Hampshire, 
and any item of moment must not be omitted. We will take them 
chronologically ; and our first item is an indirect introduction to Gen. 
Sherman, whom we shall know more about later on. 

Washington, D. C, 2 Aug. 1861. 
Brig. -Gen. Thomas W. Sherman: 

You will proceed to New York immediately, and organize, in connec- 
tion with Capt. DnPont of tlie Navy, an expedition of 12,000 men. Its 
destination you and the naval commander will determine after you have 
sailed. You should sail at the earliest possible moment. 

Thomas A. Scott, 

Asst. Sec. of War. 
Approved : A. Lincoln. 

The above will be news to many of the Third New Hampshire 
men ; but it is history. 

On the 7th of August the Manchester Mirror says: "Hawkes 
Fearing did not accept the Colonelcy of the Third Regiment, on ac- 
count of his business engagements." 

Again Gen . Sherman : — 

War Department, Washington, D. C, 11 Aug. 1861. 
Brig. -Gen. Thos. W. Sherman : 

Sir : You will proceed to the Capitals of the States of Connecticut, 
Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine, and confer with 
the Governors of those States on the subject which I have verbally com- 
municated to you, and which is conveyed to the Governors also in the let- 
ters herewith placed in your hands, and which you are requested to deliver. 
You will then proceed to New York City, as heretofore instructed. 

Tho.s. a. Scott, 
Asst. Sec. of War. 

\_EnclosHre.'] 
War Department, Washington, D. C, 10 Aug. 1861. 
Gen. T. W. Sherman, having been charged with the preparation of an 
expedition to rendezvous on Long Island Sound, will on the part of this 
Department consult with you as to the troops which can earliest be made 
available for the service. Thos. A. Scott, 

Asst. Sec. of War. 
To their Excellencies, 

The Governors of Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Connecticut 
and Rhode Island. 

And yet we knew nothing about this at the time. Shameful ! 
was n't it, boys, that we were not consulted? 



Aug. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 13 

On the 13th, Col. Fellows, Lieut. -Col. Jacksou and Maj. Seth 
Eastman, U. S. Army, recommended to Gov. Berry that the Third 
New Hampshire be armed with the Enfield ritle. They were proba- 
bly appointed to consider and recommend. 

On the 15th of August, Col. Fellows issued the first regimental 
order : — 

General Order jVo. 1 : 

Beginning tomorrow : Reveille, 5 a.m. ; breakfast, G a.m. ; guard 
mount, 8 a.m.; squad drill, 9 to 10.30 a.m.; dinner, 12 m. ; company drill, 
3 P.M. ; dress parade, 5 p.m. ; supper, 6 p.m. ; tattoo. 9 p.m.; taps, 9.30 p.m. 

Detail for tomorrow: Officer of the Day, Capt. Clark; Oflicer of the 
Guard, Lieut. Ayer ; Officer of Police, Lieut. Fogg. 



The Manchester Mirror of the 15th of August says : — 
In camp today : — 

From Manchester, . . Abbott Guard . . 95 

" . . Irish Volunteers . 74: 

" . . Carr's Recruits . 10 

Exeter 09 

Concord GO 

Laconia, etc GO 

Fisherville 13 

Newport 5 

Total .... 386 

Fellows, Jackson and Bedel were all in camp. A flag was 
raised the 15th. The Laconia men arrived the 14th, in the after- 
noon, under Capt. Badger of Sanbornton Bridge. 

15 Aug. : Stephen Love joy of Laconia attempted suicide, by 
cutting his throat with a razor, because he had been put on a short 
allowance of liquor. 

On the 16th, Capt. Randlett arrived in the morning from Nashua 
with 81 men; and in the afternoon, Capt. Plimpton with 37 men 
from Milford. First dress parade on that day, with the Abbott 
Guard on the right. Cornelius with 35 men arrived from New 
Market (really Portsmouth) . 

17 Aug. : It was authoritatively announced we were to have 
Enfield Rifles, costing S23.50 each and duties (see cost of arriving, 
etc.) We were using the old guns of the First Regiment. 

18 Aug. : Private Lawrence of the Abbott Guard narrowly 
escaped drowning in the river, while bathing. 

For the last few days, at dress parade, the drummers have been 
directed by James A. Farnham of Manchester (very smart and very 
small) . The probability is that Carr of Concord will be made Drum 
Major. 

19 Aug.: A diary says: "Co. E was filled up today." A 
squad of 7 men from Lebanon, enlisted by N. H. Randlett. 

20 Aug.: Capt. Dow (Co. H), before leaving Manchester, 
was presented with a purse of $25.00, presumably by his company. 

Gen. Sherman again : Gen. Sherman reports to the Secretary 
of War that he has consulted the Governors of the States named, 
and finds they are animated with a commendable interest in the 
matter, and can probably have on Long Island by September 5 : 



14 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIIVIENT. [Aug. '61. 

Maine, 3 regiments ; New Hampshire, 2 regiments ; Massachusetts, 
5 regiments ; Rhode Island, 1 regiment ; Connecticut, 2 regiments — 
or, say 13,000 men. 

Gen. Sherman then refers to recent orders which will divert a 
part of the forces to Washington, and says that the time set by the 
cabinet for the expedition to start is rapidly approaching and asks 
advice. 

The Manchester Mirror of 20th said : The Third New Hamp- 
shire was to leave the next Tuesday (27th). That we were ready 
except overcoats. That the arrivals for the week Avere : From 
Hampton, 56 ; Claremont, 29 ; Manchester, 95 and 77 ; Ossipee, 62 ; 
Derry, 29; Portsmouth, 40. That the previous day (19th) was the 
greatest day for visitors, it being rumored that the regiment was to 
leave. The Manchester Cornet Band played at dress parade the 
19th, which was the iirst band playing. This band serenaded several 
citizens in the evening, accompanied by several of the Third New 
Hampshire officers, and both were afterward entertained by Governor 
Berry, Hon. E. H. Rollins, Col. John H. George, Amos Hadley, 
Esq., and others. 

20 Aug. : Col. Fellows issued General Order No. 2, 
slightly amending his No. 1, the principal changes being squad drill 
before breakfast, and a surgeon's call after guard mount. 

21 Aug. : A diary says, " We mounted guard with loaded guns, 
tonight." 

[Note. — The writer begs the indulgence of the reader while he intro- 
duces the (his) first reference to what is going on in rebeldoiu.] 

21 Aug. : (Confederate) Brig. -Gen. R. S. Ripley is assigned 
to the Department of South Carolina and the coast defences of that 
State, and Brig. -Gen. J. B. Grayson is assigned to the Department 
of Middle and East Florida and the coast defences of that State. 

On the same day it was said that all the hotels, bar-rooms and 
sheds were filled with people who were after commissions in the 
Third New Hampshire. 

22 Aug. : John A. Kendall of Keene was drowned in the river 
today, while bathing. 

Let us glance elsewhere for a moment to see what is transpiring 
of interest to the Third New Hampshire. On this day Commodore 
DuPont inspected the Alabama, Stars and Strijyes, and Aagasta, at 
New York, where they were being converted into war vessels ; and 
he reports that it was like altering a vest into a shirt. 

At Philadelphia, the Tuscarora was launched, having been built 
in 58 days ; and her keel was on the stump just 70 days ago. 

• 23 Aug. : After muster-in many of the men were given fur- 
loughs for a few days. The railroads carried them for half fare. 
Our band appeared for the first time. 

24 Aug. : Adjt. Hill received an elegant sworel from friends 
in Portsmouth. Only three in hospital. Capt. Clark presented 
with valuable sword and belt. 

27 Aug. : General Order No. 3 issued. No one to leave camp 
without pass. Some of the men got their belts and cartridge boxes 
today, also their rubber and woolen blankets. 



Aug. '61.] THIRD NEW HxVMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 15 

Again, Gen. Sherman : The Secretar}^ of War Avrote to Geu. 
Sherman, enclosing letter for Governors, and says, "You will 
observe substantially that Massachusetts will be required to seikl 
only three regiments, and New York '^rill be required to send three 
regiments. 

[Endo.'^Hre.] 

War Depautment, Washington, D. C, 27 Aug. 1861. 
Sir: This will be sent you by Gen. Sberman, U. S. Army, who has 
heretofore connnuuicated with yon on the project of concentrating in a 
camp of instruction a number of regiments of U. S. Volunteers. As late 
emergency may have somewhat interfered Avith this object, I have now to 
renew the request that you will put in regiments as soon as they can be 
prepared for service under the orders of Geu. Sherman, who will indicate 
the place of rendezvous. Simon Cameron, 

Secretary of War. 

Memo. — Maine, 3; New Hampshire, 2; Massachusetts, 3; Rhode 
Island, 1 ; Connecticut, 2 ; New York, 3. 

An enclosure to Gov. Morgan of New York requested that he 
send three regiments to Fortress Monroe. 

A letter of 27th said: "Only four companies are in uniform. 
The haversacks have arrived and are at the depot. The rifles — we 
don't know where they are. The uniforms are being fitted at the 
State House by Messrs. Cumner of Manchester and McFarland & 
Shaw of Concord. The uniforms are grey, and not blue as has been 
supposed." 

28 Aug. : Company E got its uniforms before breakfast ; other 
companies later in the day. Knapsacks issued, too. The Adjutant's 
horse arrived. The companies have all been mustered in, and Col. 
Fellows has issued his General Order No. 4, which was printed and 
contained full lists of all officers of the regiment, the companies to 
which they belonged, their relative rank, the position and designation 
of the companies in the line, etc., also complete list of the non-com- 
missioned officers of each company. 

The musters-in were as follows : — 

Co. A 22 Aug. 1801 Co. H 23 Aug. 1861 

1861 I 24 " 1861 

1861 K 24 " 1861 

1861 Band 26 " 1861 

1861 Non-com. Staff . . 26 " 1861 

1861 Field and Staft* . . 26 " 1861 
1861 

29 Aug. : A grand review in the forenoon. The Governor pre- 
sented us with our colors. Some of the men got their haversacks and 
canteens today. Enfield rifles issued (not quite enough to go 
around). Col. Jackson received the gift of a horse and equipments 
from friends in Portsmouth. Received orders to go to Washington 
on the morrow. We had our first battalion drill today. 

30 Aug. : • Orders to go to Washington countermanded. We 
breathed a sigh of relief, though disappointed. 

31 Aug. (Saturday) : Gov. Berry directed the Third New 
Hampshire to proceed to New York City Tuesday morning, 3 Sept., 
and report to Gen. Sherman. 



. A . . 


22 


B . . 


22 


C . . 


. . . 23 


D . . 


. . . 23 


E . . 


. . . 23 


F . . 


. . 23 


G . . 


. . 23 



16 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Ang. '61. 

Col. Fellows issued General Order No. o, directing that com- 
pany and squad drill be dispensed with, and ordered an inspection on 
the morrow at 1» a.m., and a battalion drill at 4: p.m. (this was 
Sunday). Religious services to be held at 5 p.m., and dress parade 
at 6 P.M. The order referred to cleanliness iu person and clothing, 
and to the bathing facilities (in the river) . 

31 Aug. (Confederate): "Gen. Ripley reports .... two trans- 
ports with troops off the bar, Charleston, yesterday, and today off Bull 
Island. Probably enemy from Hatteras, after destroying batteries. 
Have re-enforced Storrs heavily . . . ." 



SUPPLKMEKT. 



[Note. — The writer finds tliat lie can handle certain matters of interest 
in tlie form of a supplement better than in any other, the items being of such 
a nature as not to admit of weaving into a storj'. The supplements will 
naturally pertain to matters occurring in or belonging to the particular 
month. Eor this month of August, 1861, however, the matters treated will 
run backward somewhat, to gather them for leveling-up purposes; and 
thereafter the supplements will run smoothly. — D. E.] 

IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

In April last the President directed all officers of the regular 
army to renew their oaths of allegiance ; and several were dismissed 
for refusing to comply. 

In May the War Department directed that $2.. 50 per month 
should be allowed for clothing, in the volunteer service. This was 
modified later in the month by making it the same as for the regular 
army. 

In May, also, a company of infantry was defined to be as 
follows : — 

MINIMUM. MAXIMUM. 

1 captain, 1 captain, 

1 first lieutenant, 1 first lieutenant, 

1 second lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 

1 first sergeant, 1 first sergeant, 
4 sergeants, 4 sergeants, 

8 corporals, 8 corporals, 

2 musicians, ' 2 musicians, 
1 wagoner, 1 wagoner, 

64 privates, 82 privates, 

83 aggregate. 101 aggregate. 

For a regiment of infantry it was defined to be : 1 colonel, 1 
lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant (a lieutenant), 1 regimental 
quartermaster, 1 assistant surgeon (but this latter was modified later 
in the month, by allowing 1 surgeon and 1 assistant surgeon) . 

In June, the War Department ordered that all sutlers be there- 
after appointed by the Secretary of War. Also in June it was or- 
dered that nurses (women) shall not reside in camp, nor accompany 
regiments on the march ; but those who apply for service, and are 





Gov. Nathaxikl S. Berky. 



Anthony Colby, 

Aajt.-Gen. 




Allen Tennv, 
Sec. of State. 



2^ ^•^ -L 



^"^^^^m 



Peter Sanborn, 
State Treas. 



An;/, 'in.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHmE REGIMENT. 17 

highly recommended by two phj^sicians and two clergymen of stand- 
ing, and will forward such certificate to Miss Dorothea L. Dix at 
Washington, will be given a certificate entitling them to service in 
any military hospital of the U. S. where such services are required. 
(In August, they were authorized to be paid forty cents a day and 
one ration.) 

In June, it was also directed that all officers entitled to forage 
were entitled to the quantity allowed in a state of war. 

In Jul}^, the War Department directed that in future no foreigner 
shall be mustered in who is unable to speak the English language. 
This was modified in August,. so that foreigners could be mustered 
into regiments speaking their own language ; and five days later the 
entire matter was revoked. 

In July, the War Department directed that Chaplains should be 
mustered-in in the same manner as other commissioned officers. 

In August, the War Department ordered that no volunteer offi- 
cer, who resigns, shall be again commissioned in another volunteer 
regiment. 

In August, also, the required height of a recruit was reduced 
from 5 ft. 4 in. to 5 ft. 3 in. 

Again, the War Department, in August, directed that officers 
could only be mustered as follows : When half of a company is mus- 
tered in, the first lieutenant; and when full, the captain and second 
lieutenant can be mustei'ed. When four companies, then the lieu- 
tenant-colonel ; Avhen six companies, the major ; when all, the colonel, 
chaplain, surgeon, assistant surgeon, adjutant and quartermaster. 

The monthly return (actual date, 27th) shows: — 



Field and Stafl' . . . 

Band 

Co. A 


. . . — men, 

. . . 9(5 " 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 


officers. 


B 


. . . 98 " 




c 


. . . 98 " 




D 


. . 95 " 




E . ... 


. . 98 " 




F 


98 " 




G 


. 98 " 




H 

I 


... 97 " 
... 94 " 




K ; 


... 97 " 





997 37 

NoTK. — This return contains several errors. 



Each company had full complement of sergeants, corporals and 
wagoner ; but D and I had no musicians ; B had one, and the other 
companies two each. Co. G had no 2d lieutenant. Lieut. Handerson 
was absent at muster and was probably afterward mustered sepa- 
rately. 

The return itself says: "Three officers with G, and 38 total 
officers ; " but it was a clerical mistake. 



18 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIKE REGIMENT. 



[Aug. '61. 



MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. 

The Coufederate Army, on the 17 Aug. 1861, according to a 
New York paper of that date, was as follows: Total, 243,000, 
divided thus : — 



Georgia . 
Louisiana 
Mississippi 
Texas . . 
Tennessee 



22,000 
14,000 
18,000 
9,000 
25,000 



South CaroUna .... 15,000 
Missouri 22,000 



Arliansas 
Alabama . , 
North Carol 
Virginia . 
Florida . . 
Maryland 
I^entucky 



10,000 

18,000 

20,000 

G5,000 

3,000 

1,000 

1,000 



There were also about '250,000 Home Guards ready for the 



field. 




SEPTKPvlBER, 1861. 




'NSPECTION on the 1st; and a sad day for some of us; 
for the sun was verj' hot, and it was our first appear- 
ance full}' armed and equipped. Several fainted, and 
some were sunstruek. We had a sermon while formed 
in hollow square, and said by some to be a regular 
^ abolition sermon. General Order No. 6, issued the 1st, 

^^ ^ provided for the usual drills, etc., and then said: " To- 
*^ morrow evening (2d) all the men will be supplied with 

two days' rations of such articles as they are now without, and wall 
have them all cooked, and in their haversacks before retiring." 

This looked like business, and the bo3's hardl}^ knew whether to 
l»e solemn or gay ; so between the two we did n't make a good 
appearance. However, we cooked our rations on Monday eve, as 
directed, and went to bed late. 

As we were so nearly ready to start toward the distant foe, it 
may be well to connect again and see what they were doing down 
where we were to go. 

1st Sept. : Confederate Gen. Ripley, Charleston, reported the 
brig West Indian ran the blockade at earl}' morn, with 1,500 bags 
of coffee. Came near being lost by Avind going down. Chased in 
by U. S. blockaders. 

We had twenty rounds of cartridges issued to us on the 2d of 
September, with the two days' rations. We had our usual drill that 
day ; but our minds were somewhere else, and we did not make a 
creditable appearance. Busy, very busy, packing up. Great many 
people in camp to see the boys. Extra guard — 120 in day and 
doubled at night, besides a picket line. 

The eventful 3d of September arrived, and we were to start for 
the front (really for Long Island). We arose early (3 a.m.) and 
broke camp. Now breaking camp is a peculiar movement, or series 
of movements, requiring skill, patience and pluck. There are man}' 
things of man}' kinds to do. First, one feels like having his knap- 
sack packed and his haversack filled, likewise his canteen. These 
being done, they must all be laid together with scrupulous care, 
where one. knows just where they are, and are not in the way 
of some one else, who does n't object to falling right over them, 
and then say cuss words. Having laid aside your traps, you 
gracefully wait till all your tent-mates have done the same thing, 
and then you all take hold and take down your tent, carefully 
removing the pins which have held it down to the ground : and you 
roll the whole together, the tent pins and the tent poles being rolled 



20 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Sept. '61. 

within the tent. They must then be tied together with the tent 
ropes, taken to the company wagon, wherever it may be, and put 
on board. You then return to your pile of goods and pick them up 
one by one and adjust them to yoiir anatomy in the manner desig- 
nated by military law and the Revised Army Regulations, which you 
have not yet seen. 

This being done, you and jj-our comrades are ready to fall in 
with the company, which has just begun to do that grand old act of 
falling in ; but just at that moment, you and a fellow tent-mate are 
directed to report to the hospital tent, or to the Commissary's tent 
to help load up medicine chests, or barrels of beef and pork, on the 
teams for transportation to the depot. There's no appeal — you've 
got to go ; and go you do. This necessitates, when you shall have 
arrived at the aforesaid place, the removing of all these various 
personal adornments of knapsacks, haversacks, guns, etc., and 
laying them in a pile again, where no team will run over them, and 
load those chests or those barrels. 

By the time you have completed the job, and got yourself all 
out of sorts (and about one in a hundred will not do this), you hear 
the order of the Colonel to the regiment, which has been forming 
during this really brief period, to "Forward, march ! " and off they 
go. You and your companions fix yourselves up, and hasten on, 
catching up with the regiment, after about half a mile. Are you 
weary? Are you jaded with hurrying? Are you warm? "Yes, 
yes, yes ! " you say, and in a tone that means " Let me alone ! " and 
we '11 do so. 

This first dose of breaking camp may be a lesson. It will occur 
again, but with variations. Perhaps you '11 be sent out to skirmish 
at the last moment ; perhaps you '11 be on picket and do n't know 
when you '11 be relieved, and yet knowing that your regiment or 
company is on the move. And so we might go on with the varia- 
tions ; but they are absolutely innumerable, and we desist. 

We march to the depot, escorted by the Concord Zouaves, 
Capt. Summers, the Concord Serenade Band, besides our own band, 
which could hardly be called an escort. The three bands have 
bright and new uniforms. Did we step lightly that morn? Yes. 
Did we eat much breakfast? No. 

We were in high glee that morn ; and well we might be. The 
surroundings were pleasant, the music of the three bands (which 
alternated in playing) was inspiring — " The Girl I Left Behind 
Me " thrilled us through and through ; and we felt as well satisfied 
with ourselves as we ever did in our lives, earlier or later. The citi- 
zens turned out in a body, meeting us ere we reached the station 
and accompanied us there. Deacon McFarland, the editor of the 
Neiv Hampshire Statesman., came over to camp and marched with us 
to the depot, where we were met by Governor Berry, Secretary of 
State Tenney, State Treasurer Sanborn and other officials. We 
were drawn up in line in front of the depot, to await the making up 
of our train. The citizens showered all sorts of eatables upon us, 
and treated us otherwise with a deal of attention. Everybody was 



Sept. '01.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



21 



excited (excited mostly with pleasure) with the proper amount of 
patriotism mixed in, aud cropping out, too, at intervals. 

We are about ready to start ; but what is our condition, and of 
what value are we? Values are generally based upon cost. Let us. 
see what we have cost up to the 3d day of September : — 



Recruiting ($2.00) 
Board Bills . . . . 
Pay ($13 per month) 
$10 bounties . . 
09 horses . . . 
22 wagons . . . 
Harnesses . . . 
Band instruments 

Caps 

Drawers .... 



•S 2,000 

2,500 

.•),800 

10,160 

11,767 

. 3,280 

1,353 

1,200 

1,158 

989 

Sliirts 2,510 

Cap letters 62 

Blankets 3,611 

Frock coats 6,052 

Trousers 3,453 

Overcoats 7,021 

Shoes 1,488 

Stoves 770 



. 30 



Haversacks . . . 
Knapsacks . . . 
Blouses .... 

Socks 

Rations .... 
Canteens .... 

Tents 

1,030 Enfield rifles 
Equipments ...... 4 

50,000 Cartridges .... 

One bill for transportation, by 

Con., Man. & Law. R.R. 1 
Hospital supplies .... 
One bill (transpoi'tation) 

Boston, Con. & Mon. R.R. 
One bill (only) 

Concord & Portsmouth R.R. 



341 

282 
,208 
467 
,192 
420 
,150 
.149 
,148 
362 

,900 
900 



THE COST OF A REGIMENT. 

To the larger bills, add for such items as straw, hay, oats, 
Avood, stationery, telegrams, express, pistols, swords, chests, freight, 
teaming, plates, spoons, knives, forks, dippers, camp-kettles, mess 
pans, axes, horse-shoeing, hatchets, shovels, drums, bean-pots, 
brands, soap, etc., and we have a grand total of over one hundred 
and twenty thousand dollars. On the basis of 1,000 men, each man 
and his outfit has cost $120. 

Reader, having arranged that you shall be introduced to the 
Third New Hampshire at this point, will say : first, that here we are, 
"a thousand strong," in front of the station at Concord, young, 
buoyant, patriotic, in full and new uniforms, armed with the Enfield 
rifles, having 20 four-horse wagons and 1 two-horse wagon with our 
camp equipage ; a train standing ready for us, composed of 23 pas- 
senger and 29 baggage cars. And thus, having the regiment with all 
its trappings at its very best, we say: "Reader, the Third New 
Hampshire. The Third New" Hampshire, Reader. Shake ! " You 
are introduced now to as good (and as expensive) a regiment as 
ever left the North. We do not say we are better — it wouldn't be 
modest ; and if an}' soldier is discovered to be modest, he is known at 
once to be from New Hampshire. As to the expensive part, it Avas 
truly said : that the Third Regiment cost more to the square inch 
and had more horses and wagons to the square yard than any regi- 
ment that left the State. 

On our march to the depot, we had more the appearance of an 
army corps than of a single regiment. Later in the war, an army 
corps did actually cover less ground and was lesser in almost every 
respect. 



22 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [&^iL '61. 

If the reader will accompan}', we Avill pass him free. We go 
ou board the waiting cars, amid huzzas, hand clapping, waving of 
flags, playing of bands, etc., and are off at quarter past eight for 
Long Island. Hon. Frederick Smj^th of Manchester (afterward 
Governor of New Hampshire) accompanied us as far as Hunter's 
Point. 

And now that the regiment is where it can be examined, let us 
take notes as to what walks of life those men came from, and what 
their country or State. For the former we are indebted to the 3Iayi- 
chester 3Iirror^ which published the occupations 27 Feb. 1862 : — 

450 farmers (nearly one-half of 30 manufacturers, 

regiment). 27 painters, 

69 laborers, 15 teamsters, 

44 machinists, 16 clerks, 

31 carpenters, 

And the balance so diversified as to render it impracticable to insert 
it here. 

The nativity was as follows : — 

New Hampshire .... 626 ^Maine 70 

Massachusetts 118 New York ;^1 

Ireland 116 The rest scattering. 

Vermont' 81 

In censusing these men, we- have been careful not to count the 
150 recruits for Second New Hampshire who accompanied us. 

At Manchester and at Nashua we only slowed up a little, and 
were greeted with the plaudits of the assembled but disappointed 
crowds, and sped onward. 

At Clinton, Mass., we stopped for half an hour ; and it may 
truthfully be said we enjoyed every moment of that half hour : for 
we were visited by apparently all the young ladies of thaf town. 
Wq really thought we had run into a female seminary. We swapped 
photographs and addresses, and had a good time generally, promised 
to write them — and off we went for Worcester, where upon arrival 
at the Junction we stopped about half an hour, and had a collation 
served us in the cars. This over and the State officers took their 
leave ; and off we were again, for Alljnr's Point, Conn., which we 
reached about G p.m., and boarded the steamers Connedicut and City 
of Xew York, during a heavy thunder shower. 'T was dismal enough. 
We "camped" where we could, each man winding himself around 
his gun and equipments, and using his knapsack for a pillow — and 
mattress, too. To say that it required a long time to embark would 
seem superfluous. The extraordinary time had to be paid for; and 
here again we remark that the Third Regiment was a costly one. 

State of New Hampshire to Steamer Connecticut, for detention .$365.00 

" 1,058 meals, 25 cents 264.50 

" " " " " provisions not used 330.50 

Total for Third New Hampshire Volunteers .... $960.00 

It may truly be said that good things come high ! The reader 
must not be surprised to hear that a very lai:ge percentage of the 



Sept. 'G2.] THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 23 

men were seasick. Such was the fact, as many a poor fellow can 
■testify who never before had experienced those peculiarly pleasing 
sensations which invariably accompany seasickness. 

HoAvever, despite the storm and the waves and the seasickness, 
we arrived next morning -i Sept. 18(31, at Hunter's Point, Long 
Island (near Brooklyn and New York City), and pulled up to the 
wharf about 8 o'clock. Here we staid, strolling in the vicinity, the 
band playing " Home, Sweet Home," till a train was made up, taking 
the major part of the regiment (about 10 a.ji.) to Mineola, a small 
village bordering on the town of Hempstead, about IS miles distant 
on the Long Island Railroad. The rest of the regiment and baggage 
and horses and wagons went on a later train. We Succeeded in 
getting our tents pitched for use, though irregularly. Re-pitched 
next day. Miueola as a village is somewhat insignificant as to size. 
From the main line of railroad a branch runs from Mineola to 
Hempstead, a nourishing and aristocratic town of considerable pre- 
tensions, and located about two miles away. 

We arose bright and early on the 5th da}^ of September, 1861, 
and began camp life and routine, as in Concord. 

Col. Fellows issued an order of that date (no number) and 
called the camp " Camp Sherman." In that order he saitl : — 

This regiment behig the first to occupy this camp ground .... otlicrs 
soon to arrive .... it is hoped we Avili set a good example .... and 
become tlie model regiment of the command .... 

Beginning tomorrow (Oth) : reveille, at 5; company drill, 5.30 to 7; 
brealcfast, 7; guard mount, 8; surgeon's call, 8.30; squad drill, 9 to 11; 
dinner, 12; company drill, 2 to 4 : battalion drill, 4.30; dress parade, 5.30; 
supper, G; tattoo, 9; taps, 9.30. 

Orders of the above kind will not be repeated herein, except in 
cases where radical changes are made. 

The 5th day of September was prett}^ well occupied in re- 
arranging our tents, in digging sinks, and getting ready to stay. 
The (ith was ushered in with ceremon}', and we began to comply 
with the order of exercises as shown above. On the 7th a diary 
says: "The Co. E boj's went to village (Mineola) and broke up a 
rum shop, destroying several casks of liquor." Another diary 
(same date) says : "All the field and staff horses in a barn." The 
Chaplain's diary (same date) says: "Had evening prayer meeting." 
Inasmuch as the Chaplain must be separately written about, it 
follows that it will be impracticable to separate him personally from 
any and all that pertains to religion and religious observances in the 
regiment. • 

8 Sept. 1801 : The rebel Governor of Georgia asked the 
authorities at Richmond to increase his military force. 

[Note. — There will appear from time to time in the work what may 
be termed rebel news ; but only such will be inserted as, in the writer's 
opinion, has some connection with the movement of the Third New 
Hampshire or of the force to Avhich it belongs. The connection in this 
case being, briefly stated, that the force concentrating at Hempstead Plains 
Avas for a special purpose — for an attack on some Southern port or point; 
and it appears that the Governor of Georgia snufled the battle from afar. 
Possibly the writer was mistaken. He gives it for what it Avas worth.] 



24 THIED NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Sept. '61. 

It is said we have uo colors of our own, but carr}^ tlie weather- 
stained flag of the returned First New Hampshire, the gift of the 
Sons of New Hampshire resident in New York. (New York 
Tribune.) 

Of the regiment and its new camp at Mineola the New York 
Herald of 15 Sept. gave a good account. It said -. — 

.... Hempstead Plains (or Flats, as it is called) is situated on the 
Long Island Railroad, about 18 miles from New York, and embraces a 
portion of land 18,000 acres in extent, and lies between old Hempstead 
Village and Hempstead Branch, Avhere the railroad branches oft' from the 

mainline .... wells 20 feet deep .... water superior to Croton 

Third New Hampshire .... fully supplied with everything appertaining 
to the use and comfort of the regiment. Tents, baggage Avagons and teams, 
ambulances and medical stores have been supplied in abundance; and if 
any of the men sufter for anything to which a soldier is privileged, it is 
their own fault. 

T'he personnel of the regiment is composed of the very best men in the 
old Granite State. Among fhe privates are several independently rich men 
.... who steadily refused .... office. The officers are a very flue and 
intellectual set of gentlemen .... 

OnThursday evening an interesting ceremony took place . . . . Hon. 

Searing, late member of Congress, having presented the regiment, a few 
days previous, a tine tree for a flag statt" .... the ship riggers .... of 
the regiment made a mast of it ... . and placed it in position. Toward 
evening tlie Rev. Henry HiU (our Chaplain), .... pronounced evening 
service, which was an imposing affair. The entire regiment formed in a 
hollow square, facing inward .... officers in the center, and .... a 
number of ladies . .". . an improvised pulpit .... a snare drum on top 
of a base drum .... covered with the American flag .... He 
preached an excellent sermon, the band played a hymn, all joined in singing 
.... marched to flag stalf .... stars and stripes run up amid deafen- 
ing hurras .... cheers given for the flag, for Gen. Scott and for Gen. 
Viele, who was on the spot and spoke a few words by invitation. 

The Eighth Maine is composed of good enough material, but is not yet 
disciplined to take the field — in fact, the men have yet to learn that they 
are soldiers .... Gen. Viele, however, promises to put these gents 
through a series of sprouts .... 

Gen. Viele is determined that the men shall not sufter from rank 
poison, which some of the liquor dealers of Mineola (the adjacent village) 
sell .... for spirituous liquor. On Thursday evening .... three Eighth 
Maine .... intoxicated .... he sent patrol to demolish the contents of 
the remaining bottles .... 

Dr. C. H. Crane, XT. S. A., of Brig.-Gen. Sherman's staft', visited the 
encampment yesterday (Saturday, 14th), to inspect the brigade, and 
ordered a re-inspection of the regiments. In the New Hampshire regiment, 
Maj. Eastman, the U. S. muste'i-ing officer at Concord, allowed some to 
pass, notwithstanding their physical unfitness, against the remonstrances 
of the doctor. The medical inspection wiU take place today or tomorrow. 
[At the moment this paper was issued the regiments were Avell on their 
way to Washington.] 

Gen. Sherman .... headquarters .... Stevens House, this city. 
Brig.-Gen. Viele has not yet had his staft" assigned to him. 

Then follows a complete roster of the officers of both regi- 
ments. 

As an illustration of the uncertainty of "news," the following 
was a good sample. The Neio York Herald of Friday, G Sept., 
said: "The Third New Hampshire regiment left Concord on Tues- 
day (3d iust.), and may be expected here at an early hour this 



MIWEOLA, L<,nji,u«i. 

Pjrfmaiter IgSg - Lukt Fieri- , 
Start teil'ZS - LuKepIceV. 




To HeMPfT6.AJ> 



PARADE 
&ROUMD 



ACRICULTURAL FAIR GROUND 



((.alrl out since, u/d.^ ^^ 



I 



Jo HEMP-»'TE/1D Xt.""1«^s 



Sept. 'Gl.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 25 

morning. They are to report at Gen. Sherman's camp of instruc- 
tion at Hempstead, where the ten New England regiments will 
assemble." 

The same paper (of the 8th) stated that a telegraph office had 
been opened at Camp Sherman, Hempstead Branch, L. I. 

[From time to time the movements of other regiments will be 
noted herein.] 

The Third Rhode Island arrived at Fort Hamilton, New Yoi-k 
Harbor, on the <Sth of September. The Eighth Maine, the only 
other regiment arriving at Mineola (all reports to the contrary not- 
withstanding) , arrived at Mineola on the evening of Thursday, 12 
Sept., about 700 strong. They had Sibley tents, grey uniforms, 
regulation hats, 80 horses, 20 wagons, and to he armed with Enfield 
ritles. 

The Nev) York Herald of the 10th of September stated that the 
camp had been named "Camp Winfield Scott," in honor of Lt.-Gen. 
Scott, by orders from War Department, and that Gen. Sherman had 
taken up his quarters at camp. 

Thursday, 12 Sept., the press announced that six companies of 
Col. Serrell's New York Engineers had been mustered in and were 
in camp (near or in New York probabl}'). A diarj'^ says our camp 
faced the south and Hempstead, Avith the rear toward Mineola, and 
that the regiment had 214 tents up. The Xev: York Herald of the 
loth of September gave notice of the organization of the Forty- 
sixth and Forty-seventh New York regiments. 

Of our stay at Mineola, not much additional can be written. 
Drill, drill, drill, every day. The usual camp scenes : of visitors of 
both sexes, of venders of fruits and vegetables, of receiving mail, 
etc., etc. An occasional visit to the pretty town of Hempstead, by 
detachments, accompanied by our band, which latter seemed to be 
the "open sesame" ever^'where, and also visits by our officers to 
the towu, all conspired to bring the townspeople and the Third New 
Hampshire into a condition of friendliness which resulted in their 
sending us a flag, of which an account will be written in its proper 
place. 

On the 9th, Gen. Sherman issued his first formal order (No. 1), 
announcing his staff as follows : — 

Maj. H. G. Wright, U. S. Engineers . . Chief Engineer. 

Capt. John McNutt, U. S. Ovq\. . . . Chief Ordnance Officer. 

Capt. Rufus Saxton, Q. M. D., U. S. A. Chief Quartermaster. 

Capt. Michael R. Morgan, C.S., U. S. A. . Chief Commissary. 

Lieut. Silas Crispin, U. S. Orel. ... 

Asst. Surg. Chas. A. McCall, Med. Dept. U. S. A. 

Lieut. Geo. Merrill Volunteer Aide. 

Lieut. James Wagner " " 

This order also directed that the camp should be called " Camp 
Winfield Scott;" and further, that Gen. Viele, having been assigned 
to duty with the command, would take post at the camp ; and 
furthur (the boys were interested in this), "Mr. Barr, having 
received the appointment of Sutler to the command, he will be 
received and acknowledged accordingly at Camp Winfield Scott and 
at the camp attached to this command at Fort Hamilton." 



26 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. ISept. '61. 

On the 10th we were reviewed and inspected by Maj. Wright. 
On the 12th Gen. Viele issued his first order (No. 1), assuming 
command of camp and announcing the same routine, substantially, 
as had been ordered by Col. Fellows. 

On the 11th it rained, and we had a short drill in the afternoon 
and no dress parade. That our men were bound to be cleanly was 
evidenced by the fact that ou the 12th a company went four miles 
to bathe ; and they didn't go in barouches. 

13 Sept. 1861 : Confederate Gen. Grayson, at Fernandina, 
Fla., wrote his Secretary of War in great alarm and enclosed to him 
an anonymous circular. 

That same 13th of September Gen. Sherman directed Capt. 
Saxton "to provide transportation in good, sound, safe steamers for 
fourteen regiments of infantry from New York for localities not 
named in the contract .... be ready to leave on 5th of October 
.... there will also be required transportation for 1,400 tons of 
ordnance and ordnance stores, commissary and quartermasters' 

stores, horses, etc water for men and horses for 15 days 

.... get two steamers ready by 1st of October if expedient." 

On the 14th one Ambroses Jose Gonzales sent a plan of Edisto 
to Jeff Davis, and suggested how the island (and also Port Royal) 
might be protected and defended. 

Perhaps the reader already tires of the Camp on the Plains : we 
will stir him up. Ou Saturday, 14 Sept. ISGl, in the forenoon, 
while on drill, and a part of the regiment away to bathe, an order 
came from Washington to get ready to proceed to that beleaguered 
( ?) city at a moment's notice. "To Washington ! To Washington ! " 
was the cry. Everybody excited — hardly knew what to do first; 
but having been through the form (and fun) of breaking camp once, 
at Concord, and not under the special pressure of an impending 
fray, we were in better condition to cope with the new adversary. 
While on battalion drill in the afternoon, the order came to proceed 
at once, and we proceeded. 

The order which stirred us so deeply was from Gen. Scott, and 
was, " Come here with all your command without delay, leaving the 
smallest guard necessary to protect your camp." 

We got ready, and the cars having been backed down on the 
Hempstead Branch, about 9 in the evening, we boarded and started 
on our mission, i. e. to save ( !) Washington. 

We were taken from Hunter's Point directly across to Jersey 
City in the steamer Kill- Von-KuU (that steamer still plied the waters 
of New York harbor in 1891), arriving at Jersey City about 
midnight, and started soon after in the cars for Philadelphia, via 
Camden. We reached Philadelphia about 9 o'clock the next (Sun- 
day) morning, startling the inhabitants of that peaceful village as 
they were getting ready for church. We were taken to the famous 
Cooper Shop Volunteer Refreshment Saloon, at lOOi) Otsego street, 
and there and then breakfasted, rested, Avrote letters, swapped 
addresses and photographs with the demure though pretty little 
Quakeresses, and had a pleasant time generall3^ In fact we quite 
forgot that we had got to save Washington at all hazards. 



Sept. '61.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



The famous "Cooper Shop," as it was called for short, was 
originated by Wm. M. Cooper and a few other citizens of Philadel- 
phia, in April, 1861. The seating capacity was about 500. Those 
public-spirited citizens fed over 600,000 men, at a cost of about fif- 
teen cents per meal. It is said that Mr. Cooper was a sufferer, 
financially, by this gift, which he vainly hoped would be partially 
borne by the public, which really failed to respond to the degree de- 
sired by him and his associates. 




THE FAMOUS "COOPER SHOP." 

We were oft" for Baltimore, after a long delay, reaching that 
noted city about ha If -past six in the afternoon. Before reaching the 
city, nearly every man instinctively, and certainly without orders, 
loaded his gun. We had heard of the Massachusetts Sixth, and had 
heard of Baltimore. We had a hot and weary march through the 
city. We were not ' greeted with friendly cheers, neither was the 
American flag in everybody's hand and window. There was a sullen, 
significant silence which was almost felt, and in a sense was painful. 
To be sure, a few of our stragglers were spoken to in an unfriendly 
way ; but, so far as the writer was aware, no act of violence was of- 
fered. Again Ave were delayed. It must be understood that our 
sudden onward movement was too great a one to go forward rapidly. 
Transportation must be furnished : and in doing so, more or less 
confusion and delays were inevitable. We staid nearly all the time 
in and about the cars and depot, not many venturing far away. 

At half-past nine we were oft' for Washington. It having been 
ascertained that the men's guns were loaded, and we so soon to ap- 
proach Washington, which had a line of guards, etc., completely en- 



28 THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. [Sept. '61. 

circling it, the order was given for the men to discharge their 
pieces in the air as soon as we had cleared the station. This they 
did, and the Baltimoreans for the moment thought we were firing 
into them ; for the assembled crowd 3'elled and started back as one 
man, and the rumor flew about the city that a fight was in progress. 
This was soon over, and we far awa}^ and slowly approaching the 
city we were to save : and save it we must, as Scott himself had 
said it. 

At the Relay Station we took off our dress coats and put on' our 
blouses — can't say why. We reached Washington about one next 
morning (16th), and found the city to be yet in the hands of its 
friends, and that we should n't have to perform the arduous task of 
saving it. What a sigh of relief we all heaved ! Had this been 
heaved before the train stopped, one cannot really say what the re- 
sult might have been. 

Soon after landing at the capital of our country, we were, at 
daylight, taken to the dining room of the Soldiers' Eest, where we 
had been housed since arrival. After viewing the edibles we heaved 
another sigh, but of a different variety. Hear what the Historian of 
the Sixth Connecticut says of the Soldiers' Rest : — 

Three lona; tables, ruiming the length of the building, were piled up 
with chunks of half-boiled pork, which looked as if it had been cut from the 
hog, Avhen first killed ; for tlie bristles were long enough to lift up each 
piece by. A quantitj' of stale and musty bread and some very muddy coftee 
completed our bill of fare. We had not anticipated such a "re-treat" as 
this .' . . . we did retreat, however, and got our breakfast at the eating 
houses. 

We were not favorably impressed with the capital of our coun- 
try. Geese and pigs roamed at will, in our vicinity at least. The 
streets were lined with pieces of marble for the yet unfinished Capi- 
tol. We staid around there, some of us lunching oft' the smell of 
cooked food, and stood in line and stood around loosely generally 
till about 4 p.m., apparently nobody's children. At that hour we 
were marched about two miles east of the Capitol and stopped at a 
place near a poor house and a grave yard. They have other names, 
which will be given later. We got our tents up and slept in them, 
too, that night. 

How fared it with the other regiments that were to be our com- 
panions in arms? How and when did they get to Washington? 

On the day of our arrival in Washington, Gen. Scott issued a 
General Order, calling the attention of all the troops to the Army 
Regulation requirement that all official communications must be sent 
through the proper military channels. 

The New York Herald of 17 Sept. 18G1 (rather late) announced 
the sudden departure of the troops from Long Island, and said, "there 
are at least three distinct naval expeditions afoot." 

17 Sept. 1861 was a rainy day; and during it we heard heavy 
firing toward Arlington, the first hostile guns we had heard. Our 
camp ground being somewhat flat, and the soil clayey and the rain 
heavy, many of us were " drowned out." Next day (18th) Presi- 



Sept. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 29 

cleut Liucoln notified the Secretary of War that the joint expedition 
of the army and navy, agreed on some time since, was in nowise to 
be abandoned, but must be ready to move by fifst of or very early 
in October. 

Drill was resumed — squad, company and battalion, as well as 
dress parade. To those who have always queried as to the disposi- 
tion of our magnificent outfit left by us at Long Island, the following 
will be very valuable and consoling. Gen. Sherman, on the 18th, 
ordered that — 

The horses, harnesses and wagons belongin<r to the Third New Hamp- 
shire Vohmteers and Eighth Maine, and as much of the camp equipage as can 
at present be dispensed -with, will be turned over to Capt. R. Saxton, A. Q. M. 
at New York, who will receipt for the same and the rest of the public prop- 
erty at Camp Winfleld Scott as new. All private baggage will be forwarded 
to Washington without delay .... The officers and guard left at that camp 
will repair without delay, in charge of the baggage and public property 
named, to Washington .... Capt. Saxton Avill furnish the necessary trans- 
portation .... (additional). Any sick, unable to travel, will be sent to 
Fort Hamilton. 

While at Washington we were permitted to visit the Capitol and 
city, going in squads and generally in charge of an officer. On the 
l'.»th, at dress parade and prayers, we were highly honored by the 
presence of the President. 

On that day also, Gen. Sherman issued orders as follows : — 

General Order No. 5 : 

This command will for the present be divided into three brigades. 
First Brigade. Second Brigade. Third Brigade. 

Brig.-Gen. Egbert L. Viele. Brig.-GenT Brig. -Gen. H. G. Wright. 

Forty-sixth N.Y. Me. Conn. 

Forty-seventh N.Y. Me. Conn. 

Forty-eighth N.Y. N.H. * Mass. 

Eighth Me. Mass. * Mass. 

Third N.H. 
*Tlie first to arrive. 

The Rhode Island regiment (Third) is reserved for special service and 
will be disposed of hereafter. 

The blanks were left in the order because of the uncertainty. 
Several regiments were expected ; but just what their numbers would 
be was uncertain. 

On the 2Uth, Gen. Sherman urged upon the troops, by an order, 
the necessity of drill and discipline, and that the flank companies be 
drilled as skirmishers. He also inspected our brigade the same day. 
It may be a relief to the reader to learn at this point that our camp 
was between the Almshouse and Jail and near the Congressional 
Cemetery, and also near the Eastern Branch of the Potomac — near 
enough, at least, to admit of our going there to bathe. 

On the 25th occurred one of those very pleasant episodes which 
time does not efface from one's memorj'. It would appear that the 
ladies of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Hempstead (near our 
camp at Mineola) became so attached to the regiment during its very 
brief stay that they had formally voted to donate to us a silken flag ; 
but before its completion we had been spirited away. Determined 



30 THIRD NEW HAMPSIIIKE IIEGIMEXT. iSept. '61. 

uot to be deprived of the pleasure they had anticipated for them- 
selves in giving and we in receiving the gift, they appointed a 
committee of three- gentlemen, Rev. M. L. Scudder, Stewart Haff 
and S. N. Snedeker. (Mr. Snedeker was a Supervisor at Hemp- 
stead during the entire war. Mr. Scudder was the pastor of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church at Hempstead. 19 Oct. 1888, the 
writer and Capt.T. M. Jackson visited the old camp ground and 
Hempstead. Mr. Snedeker was still there.) 

This committee had arranged that on the 25th the presentation 
should take place. As the ceremonies were being performed, how 
our hearts thrilled with emotion ! That e.very man vowed the flag 
should never be disgraced or captured, need uot here be said. It is 
recorded thus elsewhere. The New York Herald of 2Gth said : — 

.... The band played the "Star Spangled Banner." Col. Fellows 
responded, and assured the committee that the colors Avould never be dis- 
honored. Tlie regiment then saluted the flag and gave three cheers and a 
" tiger," concluding with praj'er by Rev. M. L. Scudder of the committee. 
The ceremonies were witnessed by a large concourse of people. 

The uncertainty of the arrival of troops at particular places was 
further illustrated by the despatch of Gov. Morgan of New York to 
the Secretary of War, on the 21st of September, from Albany. He 
said, substantially: "I have sent, the Forty-third, Forty-sixth, 
Forty-sev'enth, Forty-eighth, Forty-ninth and Fiftieth New York to 
Washington. The first three were for Sherman at Long Island, and 
the last three were for Gen. Wool at Fortress Monroe ; but all have 
been sent to Washington, by your order for all regiments to be sent 
at once." 

On the 21st we had a grand inspection by Gen. Sherman. 
There was a heavy rain, and consequently no dress parade. Quar- 
termaster Nesmith went to New York for our baggage, etc. The 
New Jersey regiments near us marched off. 

Our regimental baggage was started (22d) from Long Island. 
Our regiment was visited by a large number of the Second New 
Hampshire and by the President, and we had the usual Sunday in- 
spection. Gen. Viele issued an order on the 21st, referring to 
passes, drill, discipline, etc., and placed Lieuts. Robinson and Bates 
of the Eighth Maine in arrest. We have at this time got quite used 
to frequent, distant firings and to local long rolls. 

We had an inspection of arms the 21st. Gov. Andrew of 
Massachusetts notified Gen. Sherman the 21st that the five regi- 
ments forming when he was in Massachusetts had been sent to the 
front; and the three next (then) forming {i.e., Twenty-second, 
Twenty-third and Twenty-fifth) rightfully belonged to Sherman, 
and he should have them. 

Our camp equipage arrived on the 24th (at night) from Long 
Island. We had a general review of all arms during the afternoon. 
Gens. McClellan and McDowell and others present. On that day, 
too. Gen. Viele learned with surprise that the Forty-seventh New 
York had destroyed certain private property, and appointed a 
l3oard — Col. Jackson, Third New Hampshire; Maj. Floyd, Forty- 



Sept. '61.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 31 

seventh New York; Maj. Beard, Forty-eighth New York — to assess 
the damages upon the regiment at large. ^Ye got our baggage ou 
the 25th, and we greatly rejoiced. For its necessities, a small lot of 
old tents had been issued to the regiment on its arrival at Wash- 
ington. 

Ou the 25th the rebel Secretary of War informed Gen. Lawton 
at Savannah that he had heard the expedition was for (against) 
Brunswick, Ga. 

The 26th day of September has the following items : The regi- 
ment was visited by a squad from Second New Hampshire, and its 
band. A sutler's tent was put up in our regiment. A medical 
examination of each man was begun. We had a sermon in the 
afternoon, it being a National Fast day. The President was again 
with us. As a diary shows a Co. E man examined today, it Avould 
appear that it was by companies, beginning on the right. On the 
27th it was rainy, and Ave had only a morning drill. It was said that 
the rebels were within four and a half miles of Washington. How 
affectionately we looked at our guns ! Gen. Sherman (at New 
York) notified Capt. Saxton toda^- that the fourteen regiments would 
be in two divisions, — the first 8,000 and the second 5,000, — and 
must be so arranged as to be entirely separate if so desired. The 
Sutler opened his goods for sale on the 28th (Saturday), and we had 
inspection in the morning. There was also a very large fire in the 
cit}' at midnight. 

Ou Sunday, the 2t)th, we had inspection, at which time the 
men had the Revised Regulations read to theui, concerning discipline, 
ftc. At 4 P.M. we had an excellent sermon by our Chaplain (after 
dress parade), and eight of our men (recent converts) were baptized. 
As if for an offset to this very impressive ceremony, but occurring 
prior to it, there was a row of some kind (presumably with the 
Sutler, though he had no right to keep open), resulting in four men 
being placed in durance vile (i. e., guard house). 

Target shooting had become at this time one of our favorite 
pastimes. 

Marching orders were received on the 30th, and forty rounds 
of ammunition issued. AVhere were we to go? 

During our stay in AYashington, we kept more than one mem- 
ber of Cougress busy " franking " our letters. A soldier's letter 
was sent free if the autograph of a meiuber of Cougress was written 
upon its face. This was called "franking" a letter. This frank- 
ing was almost wholh^ done at the Capitol. 

Note. — Confederate returns of 30 Sept. show : At Port Royal 
Harbor, 4 officers, 185 men; Fort Walker, 9 officers, 11)5 men; 
Braddock's Point, 4 officers, 53 men ; North and South Edisto 
Islands, 15 officers, 293 men; Sullivan's Island, 69 officers, 1,244 
men; Fort Pulaski, 10 officers, 204 men; Brunswick, Ga., 32 
officers, 477 men ; Tj'bee Island, 40 officers, 856 men ; (others not 
enumerated herein). Total present for duty: South Carolina, 249 
officers, 4,336 men. Total present for duty : Georgia, 138 officers, 
2,738 men. Only those present for duty are in the preceding figures. 



32 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Sept. '61. 



WASHINGTON. 

CoDgress moved to it 1799. Population, in ISGO, about 70,000 ; 
during the war, 250,000. The Capitol burned in 1814 by the 
British. Foundation for main structure laid 24 Mar. 1818. Corner 
stone for extension laid 4 July 1851. The dome cost $1,000,000; 
wings, $65,000 each. From floor of rotunda to inside dome, 180^ 
ft. ; to top of statue, 287^ ft. Capitol 951^ ft. long and covers 153,- 
112 sq. ft. Corner stone of first Capitol laid 18 Sept. 1793, by 
Washington, with Masonic ceremonies. A 500 lb. ox was roasted 
whole. Cost of old Capitol, between two and three millions. A 
prize of $500 and a house lot (Avorth $75) was offered for design of 
Capitol. Dr. Wm. Thornton of West Indies won it. 



SUPPLKIVLENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

An important order of the War Department in September, 1861, 
was the authorizing of the commanding officer at Hatteras Inlet, 
N. C, to recruit a regiment of North Carolinians. 

Another was providing for allotment rolls, so called, whereby 
a soldier could assign a portion of his pay to his family to be drawn 
at (near) home. The following was the form : — 



Allotment Rolls of 
We, the unclersigiied, etc. 



No. 


Name. 


Rank. 


Pay per 
month. 


Amount ; Assigned to 

to be 
reserved. Name. | Address. 


Signature. 


Remarks. 






































/ (•ertifii, etc. 
Bated Cant. Cn 



















This measure was introduced into Congress, so it is said, by 
the Hon. Henry Wilson, Senator from Massachusetts. 



^7 




Mi. 




J 



Gov. Joseph A. Gilmork. 



Gov. Frederick Smyth. 




Sept. 'Gl.^ 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



33 



The monthly returu, 
complete) : — 

Field and Statl' . . 


Washington 






Co. A . . . 


. 98 


B . . 


. 98 


C . . 


. . 95 


D . 


. . 94 


E . 


97 


F 


97 


G . . 


9-t 


H . . 


97 


I 


94 


K 


.... 95 



D. C, shows (very in- 



- officers. 



Present aggregate — 

Aggregate last report .... — " 

Gain : 3 by enlistment, and 2 by transfer. Loss : 1 discharged by civil 
authority (Co. D), and 2 discharged for disability (C and E) ; 29 men were 
reported sick (C and E none) ; 24 men reported absent sick (at Long Island, 
nearly, if not quite, all). 

As an evidence of how some errors were made at the start, this 
return shows only two wagoners in the regiment (D and H) ; hut 
such was not the fact. They were erroneously classified with the 
privates. And on this return there were five men reported as 
"missing in action." To be sure, some of our men had acted badly 
at times ; but none had been in any "action" within the meaning of 
the war term. Further, A, D and I reported no musicians in this 
return. 




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(34) 



OCTOBKR, 1861 




'XOTHER GRAND REVIEW on the 1st of October, 
and Gen. Viele issued an order on the same day for- 
Ijidding the sale of liquor in the Eighth Maine during 
the election of a Major in that regiment, which election 
(/^^J/^S) he also directed. Further, he said that " a sutler having 
K'iJiy^J'^ been appointed to Gen. Sherman's Division, he will be 
entitled to all the rights appertaining to that position." 
As if a sutler had more than one kiiovm right ! Our 
orders were countermanded on the 1st, and the usual 
target shoot and other drills, etc., took place, though for a change 
we had a brigade drill and an inspection. The Fourth New Hamp- 
shire boys visited us the 1st, and they also visited us in large 
numbers on the 2d, at which time the Chaplain prayed for them 
specially, after dress parade, though why is not apparent. 

The Congressional Cemetery was a sad scene on the 2d, Maj.- 
Gen. Gibson being buried there. "We instinctively fell in, and 
forming in the rear of the solemn procession followed to the grave. 
Co. E (and presumably Co. A, too) began to drill today as 
skirmishers. 

The Manchester Mirror of the 3d of October had a letter signed 
by 0. W. Sanborn, dated Washington, wherein he said: "Have 
spent the Sabbath with the Third New Hampshire — have seen its 
Sabbath School, heard the sermon, and seen the baptisms — nearly 
a dozen, in hollow square," etc. 

Got orders the 3d to be ready to move ; and we packed up. 
The Chaplain's diary of that date said: "Washington is the 
Nation's depot for sin." The Chaplain always was a little facetious. 
Bright and early on the 4th Ave were moved to arise by the advent 
of the teams in camp, and we had our tents struck before daylight. 
The night scene was a beautiful one, the weather being pleasant. 
By half-past sis we were on the march to the depot, where we took 
train for Annapolis. 



ANNAPOLIS. 

We arrived at this ancient city about 3 p.m., and were at once 
quartered in the brick boarding houses of the U. S. Naval Academy, 
fronting the river, and facing a beautiful green lawn, called the 
"College Green." Our horses, etc., didn't arrive until next day. 
We were informally received on our arrival by the 21st Massachu- 
setts, already located there. When we were ushered into these 

(35) 



36 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [0(7. '61. 

palatial quarters we were all smiles ; but we were glad enough to 
vacate them in a short time, as lying on the hard floors with only a 
blanket for mattress was truly hard; and as we emerged later we 
were also smiling, but it was of another sort. Other regiments 
arrived the 5th, and we had got into shape to have a dress parade 
and prayers, all of which the Twenty-first Massachusetts seemed to 
value as a great privilege to attend. 

Gen. Sherman on the 5th made a re-assignmeut of regiments 
to brigades — the Ninth Maine and Fourth New Hampshire to the 
Third Brigade (to take places of the two Massachusetts regiments 
not arrived) ; and the Second Brigade to be Eighth Michigan, Fiftieth 
Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Roundheads and the Massachusetts 
regiment daily expected in New York. The order continued by 
saying that Gen. Viele would continue the movement of his brigade 
to Annapolis, and all be ready to embark Thursday, the 10th. He 
further directed Gen. Wright to march (?) his command to 
Annapolis, also directed Hamilton's Battery to Annapolis ; and if 
no brigade commander was assigned to the Second Brigade before 
the morning of the 9th, that brigade would proceed to Annapolis 
under its Senior Colonel. Fifteen days' rations to be supplied. On 
the same day the Secretary of War directed Gen. Wool, at Fortress 
Monroe, to select one thousand active men from the fugitive contra- 
bands there to go with Gen. Sherman, and have them ready by the 
15th of October. 

Sunday (6th October), we had an inspection on the College 
Green, and it was rumored we were to leave the buildings on the 
morrow. 

On the 7th we moved our aching bones, and our tents, to the 
bajiks of the Severn River, half a mile westerly from the Academy, 
where we set up our tents and laid down those aching bones in a 
rather sepulchral place, the spot being nothing less than an old 
graveyard, said to have been the "Washington Troops' Burying 
Ground." In the evening our officers and band called upon Gov. 
Hicks, by request. 

Lieut. Maxwell was sent out during the day with a squad of 
armed men, to capture stragglers. Several were thus caught, and 
one of them was injured slightly by contact with Lieut. Maxwell's 
sword. Evidences of getting ready to go somewhere developed 
every day. Gen. Viele ordered on the 8th that previous orders 
should continue in force, except no battalion drill in the afternoon, 
passes to be required to leave camp, officers' servants not enlisted to 
be reported to his headquarters, and none to wear uniforms except 
soldiers. 

On the 9th, the Fourth New Hampshire arrived from Washing- 
ton. The Seventh Connecticut had previously arrived. Gov. Hicks 
was introduced to our regiment on the 9th, on dress parade, and 
made a very patriotic speech to us, to which we replied by three 
cheers. The city was put under martial law on the 10th and Lieut. - 
Col. Jackson appointed Provost Marshal (see separate account of 
it). On same day, too, the rebel Gen. Grayson, at Savannah, was 



Oct. '61.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 37 

relieved by Gen. E. K. Smith. A diary said: "13th, Capt. 
Clark's company (A) came in from scout." (Probably they had 
been on picket the previous night. We hadn't learned at that early 
date the proper names for various military movements.) 

The appointed time having passed for the expedition to sail, 
Gen. Sherman — in the meantime chafing almost like a madman and 
using an unlimited quantity of cuss words — evidentlj'^ got down 
to business on the 14th, and announced his staff, by an order, and 
here they are : — 

Capt. Louis H. Pelouze, Fifteenth U. S. Inf. . Acting Assistant Adj. -Gen. 

1st Lieut. Geo. Merrill, U. S. V Aide-de-Camp. 

Capt. Rufns Saxton, A. Q. M., U. S. A. . . Cliief Quartermaster. 

Capt. IMichael R. Morgan, C. S., tr. S. A. . . Chief Commissary. 

Capt. Qnincv A. Gillraore, U. S. Engineers . Cliief Engineer. 

Capt. Johu McNutt, O. D Cliief of Ordnance. 

Surgeon Geo. E. Cooper, Med. Dept., U. S. A. Medical Director. 

On the 14th, we find that Capt. Dow (Co. H) was on picket, 
and Capt. Dunbar was president of a general court-martial (five 
men to be tried) . At this point the writer finds the first mention of 
steamers. A diary of 14th said : " Eight steamers lay off here." 

Before embarking we deem it essential to insert a few 

ANNAPOLIS ITEMS. 

On the day of our arrival at Annapolis, a slave woman had 
been hung for poisoning her master, and the gallows could be seen 
by us near the railroad. 

The Fourth New Hampshire was camped about H miles from 
the Third New Hampshire. 

Of the "cart-wheel" plan of the cit}^, it is said that Cxen. 
Washington, while on a visit there, became so struck with the advan- 
tages of it, that under his influence the cit}' of Washington was laid 
out on substantially the same plan. 

The population in 1860 was 4,.520 ; in 1870, 5,744; in 1880, 
6,642. It has many times been called a " Completed City." The 
Aunapolitans claim that the wonderful growth and importance of 
Baltimore had been a great drawback to their city. 

It was here, on the 23d of December, 1783, that Washington 
surrendered to Congress his commission as General-in-Chief of the 
American Army. 

The St. John's College charter dates 1784. During the war the 
buildings were used by the government for hospital purposes. The 
grounds occupy 26 acres. One of the branches fits young men for 
the Naval Academy, The large poplar tree standing in front is 
worthy of mention. It is said to ante-date Annapolis itself. It is 
about 30 feet in circumference at its base, and is about 150 feet 
high. Beneath its branches, Washington, Lafayette, Greene and 
others have been entei'tained. 

The Naval Academy was founded in 1845, by the Secretarj' of 
the Navy, George Bancroft, and the academic routine began Octo- 
ber 10 of that year. The outbreak of the war caused its removal 





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40 THIED NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. \_Oct. '61. 

to Newport in May, 1861, and it was returuecl m the summer of 
1865. The grounds were added to in 1847, 1853, 1866 and 1874, 
and in 1888 included fift}^ acres. Lack of space forbids a descrip- 
tion of the various buildings. All this and more may be found in a 
pamphlet entitled " A Hand-Book of Annapolis and the U. S. Naval 
Academy," published in 1888 by the Anne Arundel County His- 
torical Society. 

A National Cemetery was established in 1862, and there were 
laid the remains of such soldiers as died in the military hospitals at 
Annapolis and at Camp Parole, near by. The cemetery is half a mile 
westerly from the city, is l)eautifully laid out and surrounded by a 
stone wall. Total buried, 2,482, of which 211 were unknown. 

The first theatre in America was at Annapolis, in 1752. 

The old iron cannon, half buried on State House hill, formed 
(200 years ago) a part of the armament of St. Mary's fort. It lay 
under water more than two centuries, and when discovered was thor- 
oughly encrusted with oysters. 

Of the Academy, a private letter said : " It was instituted under 
Polk's administration. The j^ard contains nice avenues, trees and 
monuments. The houses are nearly new and very fine, but have 
suffered .badly from use as barracks by a rough soldiery — nothing 
gets any mercy at their hands." 

Mrs. Judge Brewer, a loyal lady resident, visited the camp 
frequently, with delicacies for the sick, and endeared herself to those 
unfortunates. 

Some of the countersigns at Annapolis were: Oct. 12, Shenan- 
doah; 13, Utah; 14, Washington; 15, Quebec; 16, Missouri. 

A good story is told about the countersign " Shenandoah."' It 
would appear that Co. A. (and possibly others) were on picket out- 
side the camp grounds, and the hours were called thus, "12 o'clock, 
and all's well!" Just at this time, a Forty-seventh New York, 
(German) officer was going the grand rounds, being Officer of the 
Day ; and as his horse pranced up to the redoubtable private of Co. 
A, who bears the name of Sam George, this gallant Officer of the 
Day, w^ho was evidently a little "off" as to pure English, hoarsel}' 
whispered "Shinning up the Door!" Sam challenged him again 
and again, but with no better result, and wouldn't let him pass. 
That the German fired oft' some poor English it is needless to say ; 
but after awhile Capt. Clark, who was in command of the picket, 
was found, and matters set right. 

During our stay tAvo men of one of the German regiments, either 
in trying to desert or to have a pleasure trip, got capsized and 
drowned in the Severn River, not far from our camp. Their bodies 
were recovered by oystermen, with oyster hooks, next day. 

The Annapolis Gazette of. October 17 said: "Mrs. Yiele, the 
accomplished wife of Brig. -Gen. Viele, has forwarded from her home 
five beautiful flags for the five regiments of her husband's brigade. 
They Avere presented yesterday on the College Green with appropriate 
ceremonies. The presentation speeches were made by Gov. Hicks 
aud Brig. -Gen. Duryea, and responses by the colonels of the several 
regiments." 



Oct. '61.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 41 

In preparing for the embarkation of the troops, Gen. Sherman 
appointed Capt. Clark Harbor Master. ( See Capt. Clark's personal. ) 

Lient.-Col. Jackson was appointed Provost Marshal at Annap- 
olis, by Gen, Viele, October 11, with headquarters at the Assembly 
Rooms, State House. (See Col. Jackson's personal.) 

Surgeon Cooper, U. S. A., in the "Medical and Surgical His- 
tory of the Rebellion," page 230, Vol. I., says he "Reported to 
Sherman at Annapolis, finding there the following troops : Eighth and 
Ninth Maine, Third and Fourth New Hampshire, Forty-sixth, Forty- 
seventh and Forty-eighth New York, Fiftieth and One Hundredth 
Pennsj'lvania, Eighth Michigan and Co. E. of the Third U. S. Light 
Artillery ; and prior to sailing, the Seventy-ninth New York joined. 
They were all full regiments, except the Forty-sixth New York, 
which had less than 500. Variola appeared in the Eighth Maine, 
before sailing ; and after sailing from Fort Monroe (on the Vander- 
hilt) the disease caused considerable alarm." 



Gen. Sherman, evidently hopeful for an earlj' embarkation, — 
though the}' do say he continued to use strong language about the non- 
arrival of the expected steamers, — issued on the 15th an order giving 
instructions as to how to embark and how to behave on shipboard. 
The latter included precaution against fire, prohibiting any fancy 
cooking, such as frying meat or frying doughnuts in fat (this was a 
shot at our Yankee doughnuts, we fear), and fixing the allowance of 
water at nineteen gallons per day per man and three gallons per 
horse. We were visited the same day by three gentlemen from New 

Hampshire — J. B. Eaton, Mr. Seaver and . A letter of the 

16th said: " Eleven steamers in harbor ; " and that Gen. Sherman 
ordered the troops to be put in readiness to embark. It must be 
borne in mind at this point (and previously, too), that the reader of 
this is quite well informed as to the probable destination ; but the 
troops, it may be truthfully said, had no knowledge whatever on 
that point. Therefore we were speculatiug upon it. One diarj^ 
even suggested Philadelphia ! The expected order came on the 
17th, for the embarkation to take place the 18th. 

The reader may well say. Did the boys write manj^ letters at 
this time ? Yes, they did ; not only sending them off at once, 
but writing another and taking it aboard the steamer, to add a post- 
script something like this : — 

On Board Ste.vmer Atlantic, 

Bound for Somewhere, etc. 
18 Oct. 1861. 

Dear 3Iother : Though I wrote you yesterday, Avill add that our regi- 
ment embarked ou this steamer this forenoon. There are several steamers 
lying- here, taking on board the troops. God and Gen. Sherman only know 
where we are going ; and perhaps Gen. Sherman is n't sure. Some sky New 
Orleans, and some say Charleston. All sorts of rumors float through the 
air : and in trying to believe it all, is trying indeed to us poor soldiers. We 
shall soon start, — appearances indicate today or tomorrow, — so good- 
bye. We will try to do our duty, wherever it may be required ; and until 
you hear from me again believe me to be your loving and loyal son, 

John. 

P. S. (4 P.M.) : There is a mail just going ashore, and said to be our 
last chance. Good-bye again. John. 



42 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [O'L '61. 

Under the peculiarly embarrassing circumstances which sur- 
rounded Gen. Sherman, it must have tried him sorely. He assigned 
troops to steamers by orders, and we give the list here ; but it must 
be borne in mind that circumstances over which Gen. Sherman had 
no control conspired against him, and the troops did not sail in 
every instance in the steamer assigned, though very nearly so : — 

First Brigade — Brig. -Gen. Egbert L. Viele. 

Third New Hampshire Vokmteers . . . Steamer Atlantic. 
Forty-sixth New York " . . . . " Daniel Webster. 

Forty-seventh New York " . . . . " Boanoke. 

Forty-eighth New York " . . . . " Empire City. 

Horses and wagons on steamers Belvidere and Philadelphia. 

Second Brigade — Brig. -Gen. Isaac I. Stevens. 

Pennsylvania Roundheads Steamer Ocean Queen. 

Fiftieth Pennsylvania (five companies) . . " " " 

Fiftieth Pennsylvania (Ave companies) . . " ^ Vanderhilt. 

Eighth Michigan " " 

Horses and w^agons on steamer Ben Deford. 

Third Brigade — Brig. -Gen. Horatio G. Wright. 

Fourth New Hampshire Steamer Baltic. 

Sixth Connecticut " Coatzacoalcos. 

(Some mistake or omission here.) 

Horses and wagons on steamer Baltic, 
Hamilton's Light Battery . . . . . Steamer Ericsson. 
Battalion Volunteer Engineers (N.Y.), now at 

Fort Monroe " Star of the South. 

Third Rhode Island Artillery, now at Ft. Monroe, " Cahawba. 
Division Headquarters " Atlantic. 

Division Headquarters' horses on steamer Ericsson. 

Each brigade commander to select a steamer assigned to his brigade, 
for his own headquarters, and report it No sutler but the one ap- 
pointed by the Secretary of War will be recognized or received on board. 

The writer is a day ahead of his story ; but the times were stir- 
ring, and this fact is offered as an apology to the reader. On the 
17th, the Secretary of War asked Gen. Sherman if he wanted the 
Seventy-ninth New York Highlanders, in case Gen. McClellan would 
consent to spare them. Sherman replied affirmatively, but Gen. 
McClellan replied as follows : — 

Camp Griffin, 17 Oct. 1861. 

I gave Sherman all the regiments he asked for. At least two of those 
originally intended for him, and promised to me, have been diverted from 
me. The artillery promised me to replace Hamilton's Battery have not 
been given me. I Avill not consent to one other man being detached from 
this army for that expedition. I need far more than I now have to save 
this country, and cannot spare any disciplined regiment. Instead of dimin- 
ishing this army, true policy would dictate its immediate increase to a 
large extent. It is the task of the Army of the Potomac to decide the ques- 
tion at issue. No outside expedition can afl'ect the result. I hope I will 
not again be asked to detach anybody. 

Evidently McClellan had no faith in our expedition, and did n't 
mean that the Army of the Potomac should share honors with any 
other. 



Oct. '61.'] THIKD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 43 

On the 18th of October Lincoln telegraphed Sherman: "Your 
despatch of yesterday received and shown to Gen. McClellau. I 
have promised him not to break his army here without his consent. 
I do not think I shall go to Annapolis." 

Our marching orders were read on parade the 18th, and all 
passes from camp were stopped. We need not recite the movements 
incidental to packing up, striking tents, breaking camp, etc. The 
reader has been put in possession of at least one variety of such 
details. We embarked on the 18th, being taken to the steamer 
Atlantic by the smaller steamers Maijjiower and Massachusetts. 

The regiment soon found itself on board and assigned to quar- 
ters. The bunks were " three deep " and about 1 ,200 in all, and were 
numbered. Our horses and wagons were still at the wharf awaiting 
transportation. These included officers' horses and hostlers and 
wagoners of the companies. They had a unique experience, to be 
given later on. Our otHcers had a little unpleasantness, on their 
arrival on board, with the occupants of the very best state-rooms, 
who proved to be correspondents of New York papers. Our officers 
contended that to themselves belonged the priority of right to select. 
As Capt. Saxton, the quartermaster, was at Fort Monroe, he could not 
be appealed to till arrival there. Then a change occurred, and the 
officers of the Third New Hampshire were happy. We were safely 
stowed away and made fairly comfortable in our bunks, but lay at 
anchor waiting for we knew not what. The 19th found us still off 
Annapolis, and the embarkation of troops still going on. 

Our Colonel issued an order on the 19 th requiring daily two 
roll calls (at 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.), and requiring the band and field 
music (fife and drum) to practice an hour three times daily in good 
weather. We had another opportunity the 19th to send letters on 
shore. 

The 20th still found us at anchor. It was Sunday, and we 
had a sermon. Our Chaplain notes the fact that he had promised 
to preach at Annapolis that day for another minister. Gen. Sher- 
man and staff came on board. 

A paper published at Columbus, S. C. (20 Oct.), had a peculiar 
advertisement. A public-spirited citizen, owing to the poverty of 
the extremely poor, suggests the gift of meat, etc., to make soup to 
distribute. The advertisement read thus : "A Card — Soupery." 

On the morning of the 21st the long-looked-for order was 
issued, and our boys readily assisted in weighing anchor, and we 
were oft' in a southerly direction. The day was fine and the scenery 
splendid, especially when coupled with the movement of a small 
fleet. As we have a fair start, let us go back to the horses and 
wagons and hostlers, etc., left on the wharf on the afternoon of the 
18th. They staid and staid, and no notice was taken of them what- 
ever. They staid all night on the wharf, and in the rain, too. They 
continued to stay, like Casablanca, and the whole day of the 19th 
passed away and they 'd nothing to eat. In the evening they waited 
upon the Quartermaster of the Twenty-first Massachusetts, who got 
supper for them. They ate it. They had had no food for 30 hours. 



44 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_0ct.'61. 

Auotlier night was passed on that wharf, and another day too. No 
breakfast or dinner had they on the 20th. At night, Capt. Clark of 
our regiment (Harbor Master) discovered their condition, and they 
were put on board the Belvidere, to which they had been assigned. 
They reached Fort Monroe shortly after the regiment did. The 
adventures of the Belvidere will be related separately. 

To return to the regiment and the steamer Atlantic. We were 
running all right, when a fresh breeze sprung up and the sea became 
very rough, and we had sea-sickness and plenty of it. As Fort 
Monroe was our objective point (temporarily, at least), we steered 
for it, and when not far from it we struck a fog, and so dense our 
captain (Oliver M. Eldridge) decided to heave to and drop anchor. 
We remained thus all night, starting again next morning (22d) for 
P^ort Monroe, reaching it early in the forenoon, and anchored m the 
midst of what might be called a naval armada. Ships of war, ships 
of peace, big and little, steam and sail, large and small, were on 
every hand. But we were at Fort Monroe and the rendezvous. 
From this point the expedition was to sail, sooner or later. 



PREPARATIONS FOR DEPARTURE. 

The scenes of activity will hardly bear description. There were 
on the 22d about sixty-four vessels safely anchored off the fort ; and 
each seemed busy, not only within itself, but there were constant com- 
munications between, not only by row boats, but by signals and by 
the use of speaking trumpets. Several of the vessels have got to 
be supplied with coal, and with water, and with provisions. Boats 
go on shore to cai-ry mail, to carry officers and for various other 
purposes. Some regiments are put on shore for no other apparent 
reason than to stretch their legs. Troops already there, embarked. 
Among^them are the U. S. Volunteer Engineers, Col. Serrell (five 
companies) . Those men had not yet arrived at the dignity of being 
called a regiment, though they were called so later. They were 
designated as a Battalion at that time. Their special duty was to 
sap and mine, dig rifle pits and build fortifications. They rendered 
valuable service in the field of operations. In the matter of taking 
in water, coal, etc., our men furnished many details (squads). 

On the 23d, Gen. Sherman issued his order containing instruc- 
tions about landing, etc., in our expected fray. The order (No. 19) 
announced that ' ' the command will sail in a few days for its desti- 
nation .... provides for sailing in three columns .... slow 
vessels to be towed .... gives instructions as to conduct in 
meeting the enemy .... disembarkation to be in three lines. 
.... First line., Gen. Wright's brigade, flanked by two sections 
of Hamilton's Battery, accompanied by a squad of sappers and 
miners and two companies of N. Y. Engineers, with a sufficient supply 
of intrenching tools and sandbags. The second line will be Stevens' 
Brigade, and if necessary, accompanied by a section of Hamilton's 
Battery and two field pieces, to be manned by a company of 
the Third Rhode Island. The third line (reserve) will be Yiele's 



Oct. '01.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 45 

Brigade, the remaining part of Serrell's Volunteer P^ngiueers and 
the Third Rhode Island, and will be disposed of according to cir- 
cumstances .... the landing of the boats to be by command, 
abreast (surf-boats and lighters mentioned in the order). . . . The 
general officers and commanders of battalions will be furnished in 

time with the place of descent, etc The first line .... if 

opposed by greatly superior numbers, must manwuvre and perhaps 

momentarily intrench The navy to furnish 300 sailors, to 

assist in commanding and manning the surf -boats As soon 

as a landing has been effected, the boats will report at once to the 
Chief Quartermaster for supplies .... the sick and inefficient men 
will remain on board .... until provision is made for them on 

shore .... the inefficient to have charge of the sick All 

medical officers, except one for each brigade, will laud with the 

troops. Those afloat will have the care of all the sick afloat 

This order will be promulgated by Gen. Viele to his brigade on the 
25th." 

Here was richness. We were going coasting, butM'here? On 
the 23d of October the Atlantic took in coal, and we signed our first 
pay-roll (outside the State of New Hampshire) . On the 24th we were 
paid oft". The amount paid a private in Co. D was 85.63, at rate 
of $11 per month from muster-in. We also got a mail the same day, 
our Chaplain going on shore for it. This mail consisted principally 
of letters addressed to us at Annapolis and forwarded from there. 
They were welcome epistles, though, as by them we were once more 
connected with our friends, and 'twas a great treat for us, not 
knowing how long the interval would be ere we should get another. 
On the 25th, Cos. B and D were detailed to shovel coal (loading 
steamers) and the same day our gunboats brought in some prizes. 
Ordered to pack up (not much packing to do) and be in readiness 
to start. 

On the 26th a few — ver}'^ few — letters arrived, and our 
Major (Bedel) made a speech to the boys, full of patriotism and 
hope and cheer. 

An unknown stole into the cabin of the Atlantic to see how 
it fared with the officers, and seizing a bill of fare, made his escape. 
Here is the bill of fare : — 

Soup. Fish. Boiled. 

Julien. Broiled Halibut. Corned Beef and Cabbage. 

Roast Pork and Duck. 

Calves Feet, Parslej^ Sauce. 

Baked Pork and Beans. 

Assorted Vegetables. 

Ginger Pudding. Apple Pie. Cranberry Pie. 

Fruit, Nuts. 

" Ye Grods ! " ejaculated every man who covertly saw this bill. 
We leave the officers and the aforesaid bill to struggle with each 
other for supremacy, while we of the " 'tween decks" return to our 
peas on a trencher and our salt Jiorse a la mode. 

The rebel signal officer at Norfolk notified his Secretary of War 
thus : — 



46 THIED NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Oct. '61. 

A Federal soldier's hat Avas picked up today at Col. Taylor's farm, 
near Willoughby's Point, three and one-half miles from Old Point. It con- 
tained two Boston papers, 19th and 21st inst the great expedition 

.... to concentrate in Hampton Roads, and the transports are to repair to 
Annapolis and there embark a force of 25,000 men under Gen. Sherman. 
Several of the larger steamers are loaded with surf -boats .... expedition 
intended for Charleston and other places on the coast. At sundown the 
lookout reports over 100 sail of vessels in Roads. They are arriving and 
departing continually. Main part still at the Roads, and great activity 
prevails in the fleet. Capt. Jamks E. Muixigan. 

Capt. Pelouze, of Gen. Sherman's staff, issued a circular letter 
the same day, calling attention to the unexpected delay, which he 
attributed wholly to the weather, and recommends cleanliness and 
economy of water, and directs all steam transports, while lying still, 
to condense as much water as is practicable. He suggested it possi- 
ble that some of the troops would stay on board twenty or thirty 
days. He made other suggestions as to clearing all obstructions to 
quick landing, after putting to sea. 

The Wabash left New York for Fort Monroe the 19th October, 
with the Seneca^ Ottatva, Pembina, Unadilla and others. The last 
four named were built on a ninety-day contract and were called 
"ninety-day gunboats." 

About noon of the 26th the expectant fleet was unnecessarily 
excited by the hoisting of the signal to start — the Union Jack at 
the Atlantic's fore ; but we waited in vain for any movement under 
it. It appears that an accompanying signal — a gun from the 
Wabash — was to have been fired. The Union Jack was hauled down 
about 4 P.M. 

On the 26th, the rebel authorities created a new department of 
the "State of Georgia," and also of Middle and East Florida. 
Evidently they were getting ready to meet emergencies. Some of 
the sailing vessels were towed outside during the early evening to a 
better position to start from. 

On the 27th, with his headquarters on the Wabash, Gen. 
Sherman ordered a muster to take place on the 30th. On the 27th 
Gen. Sherman notified Gen. Meigs (Q, M. G. at Washington) of 
the delay, and said he feared a failure of the water supply. Said 
the horses had already been on board some thirteen days, and the 
men a week. Though all were loaded with all the water they could 
carry, some were then reduced to a supply of nine days. He further 
said that Maj. Belger had been written to, and 200,000 gallons 
required of him at once ; and as the expedition would leave at first 
favorable opportunity, the Post Quartermaster would have sealed 
instructions for the water transports, directing to what point they 
should proceed. The resources at Fort Monroe (Gen. Wool in com- 
mand) were not at his disposal, even if they have more water than 
they want themselves. DuPont considers it unsafe, said he, to put 
to sea in this weather. 

Here was a revelation : Gen. Wool apparently was not in sym- 
pathy with expedition. Several sailing vessels went to sea the 27th, 
and later information showed that some of them belonged to the 
expedition and were sent ahead for cogent reasons. "Very windy 



Oct. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 47 

today — Sundaj^ ; " and, as the Chaplain expressed it iu his diary, 
" It was too rough to preach, and no chance for a praj^er meeting." 

The wind on Sunday morning had increased to a gale, much to 
our disgust ; but by noon it appeared to have spent its force, and 
the weather cleared up. An English brig, iu attempting to leave, 
ran ashore and still remained there at night, though two tugs tried 
iu vain to pull her off. The rebels came down to the water's edge 
to look at her. We were getting impatient, though we saw evident 
signs daily of an early departure. 

On the 28th, Gen. Wool, still in command at Fort Monroe, 
wrote the Secretary of War thus (extracts) : — 

By special messenger I . . . . inform you .... the expedition .... 
is still "in Hampton Roads. Gen. Sherman lias been here since Tuesday last. 
To hasten his departure .... gave him supplies, among others, 850,000 

rounds of cai'tridges This ammunition stored at bottom of ships 

.... four days to get it out .... when I gave it ... . expected expedi- 
tion would sail at once. It is now nearly seven days, and fleet still in 

port Am now furnishing ten days' rations to the soldiers .... 

same reason as for ammunition. '. ... I will venture to assert that a worse 
managed expedition could not well be contrived. Every opportunity has 
been given the rebels to be prepared to meet them at any point on the coast. 
Among other opportunities Avas a desertion from the fleet : a petty oflScer 
[The party referred to, I And on inquiry, to have been jNIr. Hale, a young 
oflicer connected Avith the Navy, and I believe a relative of Secretary 
Welles, a native of Virginia. — D. E.] carried with him the signal book and, 
it is said, a knoAvledge of the destination of the expedition. 

Gen. Wool concluded by asking for more ammunition, for small arms, 
and called attention to the garrison of Fort Monroe, saying he was defi- 
cient in artillerists, otflcers and men, and could not man more than ten 
guns. 

By a return made the 28th of October, the entire force was as 
follows : — 



PRESENT. 








Officers. 


M 


en. 


Aggregate. 


For duty. 


Total. 


For duty. 


Total. 




26 


26 


25 


25 


51 


185 


192 


3,682 


3,796 


3,988 


137 


141 


3,015 


3,196 


3,337 


147 


153 


3,574 


3,747 


3,900 


61 


62 


1,242 


1,315 


1,377 



Division Stafl* . . . 
First Brigade . . 
Second Brigade . . 
Third Brigade . . 
Troops not brigaded 

Total ... 556 574 11,538 12,079 12,653 

ORGANIZATION. 

FiKST Brigade — Second Brigade — Third Brigade — 

ViELE. . Steat:ns. Wright. 

Third NcAv Hampshire. Eighth Michigan. Sixth Connecticut. 

Eighth Maine. Seventy-ninth New York. Seventh Connecticut. 

Forty-sixth New York. Fiftieth Pennsylvania. Ninth Maine. 
Forty-seventh NeAV York. One Hundredth Fourth New Hampshire 

Forty-eighth NeAv York. Pennsylvania. 

Not brigaded : First New York Engineers, Third Rhode Island, 
Battery E, Third United States Artillery. 

Our regiment was very much elated over the fact that our 
steamer and ourselves were honored in more than one way. Gen. 
Sherman and Staff were to remain with us, and our steamer was to 



48 ITHIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. | \_Oct. '61. 

take the lead of the other steamers and sail at the head of the 
column, following in the wake of the magnificent Wabash. The 
Atlantic, Gen. Sherman, Third New Hampshire ! The first effect of 
this information was to so swell us with pride that all other thoughts 
were for the time excluded, and it was a serious question whether 
if the enemy had appeared just then in any shape whatever, we 
would have had sense enough to fight at ail. 

During the evening our steamer took in a liberal quantity of 
provisions. 'T was the night of the 28th of October. The next 
morning's sun will shine upon us for the last time in Hampton 
Roads. 

At this point we furnish the reader with a complete list of the 
vessels composing the fleet, with all obtainable data concerning 
armament, capacity and cargoes. 



THE FLEET. 



Wabash. ' Comdr. C. R. P. Rodgers. Commodore S. F. DuPont on board, 
commanduig the naval forces. Arm. : 28 9-inch, 14 8-inch, 2 9-inch 
pivots: total, 44. Steam frigate, 3,200 tons. Built 1855. 

Bienville. Comdr. Clias. Steedmau. 
Arm. : 8 32-poimders. Did 
not start with fleet from Fort 
Monroe; joined fleet 1 Nov. 
Sidewheel steamer. Purchased, 
$161,250. 
Augusta. Comdr. Enoch G. Par- 
rott. Arm. : 8 32-pounders. 
Sidewheel. 
Curlew. Acting Comdr. P. G. Wat- 
mough. Arm. : 6 32-pounders, 
1 30-inch, rifled. 
Isaac Smith. Lieut. -Comdr. J. W. 
Nicholson. Arm. : 1 30-pouud- 
er, rifled. Screw steamer, 453 
tons. Purchased, $50,000. 
diohican. Comdr. S. W. Godon. 
Arm. : 2 11-inch pivots, 4 32- 
pounders. 

COMMODORE ■-. K. Dl'l'ONT. Ottava. Lieut. -Comdr. T. H. Stev- 

ens. Arm. : 1 11-inch pivot, 
1 22-pounder, rifled, 2 24-ponnder howitzers. Built for Government, 
$88,000. Screw steamer, 507 tons. 
Paivnee. Lieut.-Comdr. R. H. Wyman. Arm. : 8 9-inch pivots, 1 20- 

pounder, rifled, 2 24-pounder howitzers. 
Pocahontas. Comdr. Percival Drayton (whose brother commanded at 

Hilton Head). Arm. : 1 11-inch pivot, 4 32-pounders. 
Penquin. Lieut.-Comdr. F. A. Budd. Arm. : 4 32-pounders. 
Penibina. Lieut.-Comdr. J. P. Bankhead. Screw gunboat. Arm. : 1 11-inch 
pivot, 1 20-ponnder, rifled, 2 24-pounder howitzers. Built for Gov- 
ernment, $88,000. 
B. B. Forbes. Lieut.-Comdr. H. S. Newcomb. Arm. : 2 32-pounders 

(fired 43 shells). 329 tons. Purchased, $52,500. 
Seminole. Comdr. John P. Gillis. Arm. : 1 12-inch pivot, 4 32-pounders. 
Seneca. Lieut.-Comdr. Daniel Ammen. Arm.: 1 11-inch pivot, 1 22- 
pounder, rifled, 2 24-pounder howitzers. Screw gunboat. Built for 
Government, $88,000. 






Gen. Thomas W. Sherman. 



Gkn. David Huntku. 





Gen. Oimsby McK. Mitchel. 



Gen. QriNCY A. Gillmoke. 



Oct. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 49 

Mercury. A tugboat. 2 guns ; 187 tons. 

Susquehanna. Capt. J. L. Lardner. Steam frigate. Arm. : 15 8-inch. 
(Did not sail with fleet from Fort Monroe. Was temporarily de- 
tached from blockading squadron oft' Charleston, and joined fleet at 
Port Royal.) 

Alohama. Gunboat. Comdr. Ed. T. Nichols. Sidewheel. 8 guns; 1,261 
tons. (The old Alabama was a ship of the line, of 80 guns ; built 1818 ; 
2,(j3o tons.) 

UnadiUa. Lieut. N. Collins. Screw gunboat. Built for Government, 
.$88,000. 

Florida. Capt. J. R. Goldsboro. Gunboat. 

Atlantic. Sidewheel steamer. Capt. Oliver M. Eldridge. Brig.-Gen. 
Thomas W. Sherman and staff, commanding the land forces. Third 
New Hampshire Regiment, Nevj York Herald correspondent (there 
were two — the other on the Matanzas). 

Baltic. Sidewheel steamer. Fourth New Hampshire Volunteers. Horses 
and wagons of Third (Wright's) Brigade. Towed the Ocean Express. 
Had on board 40 cannon, 40 frames for buildings, Avheelbarrows, 
shovels, picks, etc., and large quantity heavy canvas. 

Ericsson. Sidewheel steamer. Hamilton's Battery (Regulars). Horses 

of Gen. Sherman and Stafl". 
Empire City. Sidewheel steamer. Forty-eighth New York (8 companies 

only : the other 2 companies on the Matanzas) . 
Daniel Web»ter. Sidewheel steamer. Forty-sixth New York. 

VanderhiJt. Sidewheel steamer. Fiftieth Pennsylvania, 5 companies (the 

other 5 on Ocean Queen). Eighth Michigan. Seventy-ninth New York 

Highlanders. Had camp and garrison equipage and quartermaster 

and ordnance stores. Towed the Great Bepuhlic. 
Illinois. Sidewheel steamer. Towed the Golden Eagle (sail). Seventh 

Connecticut. 
Ocean Queen. Sidewheel steamer. Towing the Zenas Coffin. Pennsyl- 
vania Roundhead Regiment. Fiftieth Pennsylvania (5 companies : 

the other 5 on the Vanderhilt). 
Marion. Sidewheel steamer. Sixth Connecticut, 5 companies, right wing. 

Left wing on the Parkershurg. Sixth Connecticut originally assigned 

to Coatzacoalcos. 
Parkershurg. Sidewheel steamer. Sixth Connecticut, 5 companies, left 

wing. Right Aving on the Marion. 
Belvidere. Sidewheel steamer. A part of the horses and wagons of First 

(Viele's) Brigade. Lieut. Dunbar, Forty-eighth New York, in charge. 

The others in the Philadelphia, chartered at Baltimore. 
Philadelphia. Screw steamer. A part of horses and wagons of First 

(Viele's) Brigade. The others on the Belvidere. 
Matanzas. Capt. Leesburg. Sidewheel steamer. Forty-eighth New York, 

Cos. B and K. The others on Empire City. (Correspondent New 

York Herald on board. See Atlantic.) 
Boanoke. Capt. Conch. Laden with quartermaster's, commissary's and 

ordnance stores. Sidewheel steamer. Forty-seventh New York. 

Ariel. Capt. Terry. Sidewheel steamer. Eighth Maine. 

Ben Deford. Capt. Hallett. SidcAvheel steamer. Horses and wagons of 
Second (Stevens') Brigade. 

Cahawha. Capt. Baker. Sidewheel steamer. Third Rhode Island. Em- 
barked at Fortress Monroe. 

Oriental. Capt. Tuzo. Sidewheel steamer. Gen. Viele and start" (origi- 
nally on the Empire City) . 

Potomac. Capt. Hilliard. • 



50 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Oct. '61. 

Star of the South. Capt. Kearnley. Siclewheel steamer. Battalion New 
York Volunteer Engineers. Embarked at Fortress Monroe. 

Peerless. Sidewheel steamer (formerly ran on Lake Ontario). Ladeii with 
stores, 87 beeves, 20 men. Chartered at New York by Col. Tompkins, 
quartermaster. 

Osceola. Capt. J. F. Morrill. Sidewheel steamer, built 1848. Joined fleet 
only a day or two prior to its sailing-. 39 beeves and commissary 
stores. Chartered at New York by Col. Tompkins, quartermaster. 

Union. Sidewheel steamer. Capt. J. I. Sawin. Quartermaster's stores 
and horses. (A new steamer.) 

Winfield Scott. Capt. Seldy. Sidewheel steamer. 500 of Fiftieth Penn- 
sylvania on board. Quartermaster's stores. 

Ethan Allen. Ferry boat (sidewheel steamer). 

Commodore Perry. Ferry boat (sidewheel steamer). 

Locust Point. Capt. French. Stores. -402 tons. 

Daylif/ht. 

3Iaiiflover. Capt. Phillips. River steamer. 

Young Hover. 418 tons. Purchased, §27,500. Propeller bark. 5 guns. 

Coatzacoalcos. Capt. Bocock. Sidewheel steamer. Ninth Maine. (Sixth 
Connecticut originally assigned to this steamer.) 

Governor. Capt. Litchfield. Chartered sidewheel steamer. 350 marines 
under John G. Reynolds. 

0. 31. Pettit. Capt. A. S. Gardner. 165 tons. Sidewheel steamer. Pur- 
chased, $15,000. Tug. 2 guns. 

Vixen. Small steam tug (Coast Survey). Capt. Boutelle and Prof . Bache. 
This did not start with the fleet from Fortress Monroe, but joined it 
next day. 2 guns. 

Flag. U. S. steamer. Comdr. John Rodgers. (Comdr. Rodgers was on Du- 
Pont's stafl" temporarily.) 938 tons. Purchased, $90,000. Former 
name, Phineas Sprague. 9 guns. Screw. 

Sabine. Capt. Ringgold. Sail sloop of war. Joined at (oif) Port Royal. 

Vandalia. Comdr. F. S. Haggerty. Sail sloop of war. Arm. : 4 8-inch., 
16 32-pounders. Temporarily detached from blockade, oft' Savannah. 
Arrived at Port Royal 5th Nov. (Did not sail from Fort Monroe with 
fleet.) Was sent ahead, with coal vessels, 28 Oct., to anchor ofl 
Savannah. 

Ocean Express. Sailing ship. Towed by the Baltic. 

Great Bepuhlic. A clipper sailing ship. Towed by the VanderhiU. Horses 
and forage. 

Golden Eagle. Sailing ship. Towed by the Illinois. 

Zenas Coffin. Sailing ship. Towed by the Ocean Queen. 



SAILING OF THE EXPEDITION. 

A little after five iu the morning, Tuesday, 29 Oct. 1861, the 
long delayed and much desired signal gun w^as fired from the 
Wabash, and the Union Jack run up to the Atlantic's fore. To 
say that we were up and upon deck would be too tame a statement. 
Our bodies were up, our spirits were up, our hats w^eut up, huzzas 
ascended, and all that. We very readily took a hand at weighing 
anchor, and we were off, sailing (steaming) seaward, who knows 
where? We instinctively cast a backward look, a loving glance, 
possibly our last one, toward the land and the scenes we were leav- 
ing behind. The last letter had perhaps been written home, to a 
loving mother, sister, or wife ; the tug had taken it ashore, and we 



Oct. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 51 

were cut loose, to go where blood would be shed and lives sacrificed : 
but we Avent filled with a sense of duty, aud that proved a most 
powerful panacea. The sky was without a cloud — no better day 
could have been selected. Our steamer was nearly, if not quite, the 
last to weigh anchor. No attempt was apparently made during the 
forenoon to take prescribed positions in the grand procession. Dur- 
ing the afternoon, as nearly as could be, the various vessels took 
their positions. In that order the fleet covered about 12 miles each 
way. 

On the same day the Neiv lork Herald correspondent (on the 
Matanzas) said he had heard the destination was Port Royal, S. C. 

The form of the fleet plan was like a harrow or an inverted V : 
in other words, a double echelon. The Unadilla became disabled, 
or her machinery deranged, at the start, aud was towed for awhile 
by the R. B. Forbes. 

Another account of the start says : " The order to sail was an- 
nounced at sunrise on Tuesday, the 29th of October, by a signal 
gun; and the fleet got under way about 5.30 a.m. It was a beau- 
tiful day, and the fleet presented an interesting sight. It started 
very nearly in three parallel lines and covered some ten or twelve 
miles. This order of moving could not be maintained, owing prin- 
cipallj^ to the various rates of speed of the several vessels." 

It Avas said that on the da}' previous to the sailing of the fleet, 
some 25 coal schooners were sent to rendezvous at the mouth of the 
Savannah to deceive the Confederates. 

Another account says : "3 war steamers, G sailing war vessels, 
26 steam gunboats, 4 steam ferry boats, 30 steam transports, 6 sail- 
ing transports and about 27,000 troops." 

The early morning of the 30th discovered the fleet in disorder, 
and the rising wind caused the smaller vessels to hug the shore in 
alarm. 

On Thursday morning (31st) the wind had gone down, and it 
was a perfect calm, except a long swell on the sea. This proved to 
be a calm preceding a storm. As on the previous day, the fleet was 
spread over many miles, and some not in sight. A little before 
eleven the main body of the fleet, on the presumption that they had 
outsailed the others, hove to. At this time the Atlantic was sent in 
search of the missing ones and to lend aid if necessary. Sails were 
furled in the afternoon, on the fleet, so great was the calm ; but 
towards evening black clouds appeared and the wind began to rise, 
and so rapidly as to cause alarm. 

On the 31st October the rebel government received the very 
pleasant ( ?) information that the (their) steamer Salvor had been 
captured near Key West, laden with arms. 



52 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Oct. '61. 



IMPORTANT WAE DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

The Department of the East was created October 1 , comprising 
the six New England States, under Gen. Butler, with headquarters 
at Boston. 

A general order of the 23d provided for paying the families of 
prisoners of war : 1st, to those who shall present a written author- 
ity ; 2d, to wife ; 3d, to guardian of minor children ; 4th, to wid- 
owed mother. 

Another general order, of the 26th, forbade the muster-iu of 
any more regimental bands, and directed the immediate discharge by 
the regimental commander of all members of bands who were not 
musicians.. 

Still another order, 26th, provided that when troops were trav- 
elling in disaffected parts of the country on trains, they should alight 
and walk across the bridges. 

The Monthly Return shows (on steamer Atlantic) : — 

Field and Stafl" — men, - officers. 

Band — " - 

Co. A 98 " 3 

B 97 " 3 

C 95 " 3 

D 93 " 3 

E 95 " 3 

F 93 " 3 

G 88 " 3 

H 94 '• 3 

I 89 " 3 

K 89 " 3 

Present aggregate .... 0,000 00 

Aggregate last Report . . 0,000 00 

Losses: By transfer — Field and Staff, 1; I, 1 ; K, 1. Discharged for 
disability at Annapolis and Fort Hamilton — A, 1; B, 2; C, 1; D, 1; E, 2; 
F, -i; G, G; H, 3; I, 2 ; K, 5 : total, 27 (see Jan. 1862 Supplement). 

Gains: Enlisted in Co. A, 1 ; by transfer — Field and Staff, 3; B, 1. 
ABCDEFGHI K Totals. 
Sergeants . . . .555455545500 
Corporals ....8888886 888 00 

Present sick 20 

Absent sick 17 

For duty (men) 882 

[Note. — The general appearance of this return shows a decided un- 
familiar ity with the subject, and the data of changes must not be relied 
upon as being correct. — D. E.] 

It must be remembered that we were on board the Atlantic and 
on the Atlantic Ocean. One otHcer of B was reported sick, and that 
was Capt. Wilbur. The men left at Long Island, who were unable 
to rejoin at Washington, were sent to Fort Hamilton, to close up the 
camp at Mineola, and the greater part of them were discharged for 
disability. At Annapolis, when it became apparent that we were 
soon to embark, the several sick, not fit for service, were discharged. 



NOVBIVIBER, 1861. 




^^T was a little singular that on the 1 st day of November, 
jf while we were at sea, wholly lost to view from land, the 
Confederate Acting Secretary of War, J. P. Benjamin, 
telegraphed from Richmond to Gov. Pickens at Colum- 
bia, S. C, to Gen. Drayton, at Fort Walker, Hilton 
Head, Port Royal, S. C, and to Gen. Ripley at Charles- 
ton, S. C, as follows: "I have just received information 
which I consider reliable, that the enemy's expedition is 
intended for Port Royal." 

The Bienville overtook the fleet on the 1st. 

Incidents of 3d Nov. : The Empire City, having ten compa- 
nies Forty-eighth New York, came alongside the 3fatanzas, having 
the other two companies on board. The boys cheered and the band 
played. All seemed thankful for preservation from the storm. At 
sunrise the main fleet had only nineteen vessels, and only two war 
vessels — the Bienville and the Florida. The channel was found 
about noon, and during the latter part of the afternoon the fleet 
went in over the bar, except the heavy draft vessels. These latter 
were the Atlantic, Baltic, Wabash, Illinois and Oriental. There 
were missing, at nightfall, the Ocean Eagle, Zenas Coffin, Ocean 
Exiness, Great Rejniblic and other transports, besides several gun- 
boats. 

The first gun of the (our) campaign was fired on the 3d, from 
the northerly fort, at our gunboats, about 5 p.m., to which thej' 
replied. 

THE SEALED ORDERS. 

The sealed orders, showing destination, were opened the 3d, it 
being considered that the circumstances required it. They were 
found to read as follows : — 

Headquarters Expeditioxarv Corps, 

Steamer Atlantic, 29 Oct. 1861. 
Sir : In the event of your transport being separated from the fleet, you 
will proceed to Port Royal, S. C, and report to the Brigadier-General to 
whose column your transport belongs, or officer there in command. 
Very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

Louis H. Pelouze. 
Capt. Fifteenth U. S. Infantry, A. A. A. G. 

Now that the secret, has become an open one, the account of 
Gen. Viele is worthy of insertion. 



54 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xor. '61. 

THE SELECTION OF PORT ROYAL. 

Gen. Egbert L. Viele (see Magazine American History, Oct. 
1885) says, substantially, that a council of war was held prior to 
sailing, in the inner cabin of DuPont, on the Wabash, and there 
were present Generals Sherman, Viele, Stevens, Wright, Commo- 
dores DuPont, Rodgers (J.), Rodgers (R.), and Davis. The meet- 
ing was for final instructions of the Government and to learn the 
destination. The outer door was securely fastened and a marine 
stationed several feet away, Avith strict orders to allow no listeners 
to approach. DuPont unfolded the document and read in a very 
low tone. The destination was Bull's Bay and Fernandina. 
Viele further says that he learned the destination a mouth prior, 
and DuPont admitted he had learned the same thing. "A woman 
in the case, probably," said Viele, "who probably obtained the 
points from some indiscreet cabinet oflficer." This conference held 
till nearly morning. Viele says that in the course of consultation 
he suggested Port Royal, and it was then thoroughly discussed ; 
but an adjournment was had without decision. They assembled 
again in the morning, and decided upon Port Royal. Sealed 
orders were then prepared for each vessel, not to be opened till out 
of sight of land. This decision was made known to the President 
at the last moment, notwithstanding which, Viele says, a dispatch 
was found at Fort Walker, from Jeff Davis, informing the com- 
mander of that fort that Port Royal had been selected. " Probably 
another woman in the case," says Viele. 

Turning backward a little in history, we succeed in finding that 
in June, 1861, a special board was convened in Washington to 
investigate as to the possible points of attack on the Southern coast. 
The board consisted of Capt. S. F. DuPont, L^. S. N., Capt. Chas. H. 
Davis, U. S. N., Maj. John G. Barnard, U. S. Engineer Corps, and 
Prof. Alexander Bache of the U . S. Coast Survey. Precisely what 
they decided upon is not at hand, though it can be surmised. 

On the 12th of October, 1861, a confidential order to 

said: "In examining the various points upon the coast, it has 
been ascertained that Bull's Bay, St. Helena, Port Royal and Fer- 
nandina are each and all accessible and desirable points for the 
purpose indicated ; and the government has decided to take posses- 
sion of at least two of them. Which two shall be thus occupied 
will be committed to your discretion after obtaining the best 
information you can in regard to them." 

On the 28th of July, 1861, a conference was held at Washing- 
ton, in the Navy Department, as to the probable point on the coast, 
etc. Present, Generals Scott, Totten, Meigs, Col. T. W, Sherman 
(our Sherman), Capt. H. G. Wright (our Wright) of the Engineer 
Department, and Col. Collum, Gen. Scott's aide. 

Observe that Sherman's order to prepare the expedition was 
dated 2 Aug. 1861 (see his order). 

We saw land on the 4th for the first time, and we, like 
Columbus, made a great ado about it. Gen. Sherman (temporarily 



Nov. '61.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. 



55 



on boaixl the Wabash , off Port Royal) , auuouuced in a circular the 
safe arrival of the fleet. He said he had "the unparalleled gratifica- 
tion to congratulate .... on our safe arrival Soldiers ! 

.... the eyes of your country are upon j^ou. She expects you to 
conquer .... be cool and determined .... act only at the com- 
mand of your officers, and be prompt to do so. Be not led away 
by ... . enthusiasms .... some of you have not had proper 
opportunities for instruction .... Soldiers ! you are contending 




against 
an enemy 
who depre- 
ciates your 
manhood and 
iS?'^ who denies that 
^ your prowess is equal 
to his. Belie this sen- 
timent, or you will dis- 
grace yourselves and your 
nativity." 

A diary said: " At 4 p.m. 
only thirteen vessels here ; our gun- 
boats and the rebels are firing." The 
rebel commander at Wilmington, N. C, 
was authorized the 4th to send all the 
troops he could spare whenever Gov. Pickens 
notified him that South Carolina was attacked. 
Gen. Ripley, the rebel commander at Charleston, 
reported the enemy's fleet as concentrating between 
Tybee and Port Royal. 
Incidents of the 5th : The Ericsson came in and also 
grounded, and fears were entertained for her safety ; but 
she escaped injury. Gen. Sherman, together with Generals Viele, 
Stevens and Wright, — each with his staff accompanying, — went on 
a reconnojssance, in the little Mercury, early in the morning. The 
gunboats Ottawa., Penguin, Isaac Smitlt, Curleiv, Seneca and Peyn- 
hina had a little friendly (?) tilt with Tatnall's fleet, consisting of 
the Savannah (formerly the Everr/Iade), the Screamer, Lady Davis 
and one other, whose identity could not be made out. 

The battery on Hilton Head fired its first shot the 5th, duriug 
the little tilt between Tatuall and our gunboats. Tatnall retreated 
after an hour's pleasure(?). The Pawnee arrived during the scrim- 



56 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xor. '61. 

mage, and about the time of its close sent several iron complimeuts 
(68-pounders) from her rifled guus into and over the Hilton Head 
battery. It was done so handsomely and in such an offhand manner 
that our boys were well pleased, and remarked that if they (the 
rebels) did not look sharp they would be served up on a spit for the 
Pawnee's lunch some bright morning. The Vandalia arrived under 
full sail ; and a noble-looking craft she was, with every stitch of 
canvas set and filled. Toward night the Wabask, Siisquehanna, and 
other war vessels started in to fire a few shots, but the grounding of 
the Wabash completely stopped the diversion. The southerly battery 
fired two shots in direction of fleet about sundown. But why do n't 
we go in? Are we waiting for the rebels to re-inforce, or are we 
waiting to be re-inforced ourselves by the missing portion of our 
fleet? Probably the latter. 

The rebels were certainly putting themselves into shape to meet 
us, for on the 5th Gen. Robert E. Lee was assigned to command 
of a newly created department, consisting of the coasts of South 
Carolina, Georgia and East Florida. On the same day we were 
again paid off, for the months of September and October, the pri- 
vates receiving $26. 

Incidents of the 6th : Evidently it was intended to attack on 
the 6th ;■ but a high wind prevailed, and we could all see that it would 
be worse than folly to begin the attack. Preparations were going 
forward rapidly, and we all settled down to the belief that the mor- 
row would sink us or land us. 

On the 6th November, having been paid off and battle imminent, 
our desire to send money home was gratified in an unexpected way. 
Capt. C. E, Fuller, quartermaster on Gen. Sherman's staff' (on the 
Atlantic), being one of a firm of Boston bankers (Clapp, Fuller & 
Brown) , very kindly offered to take the money and give drafts for 
the same on his firm. This kind oft'er was accepted, and man}' sent 
their spare .money in this way. Quite like nearly all voluntary ser- 
vice, Capt. Fuller's course was severely criticised, not only by some 
of the staff" officers, but by others as well. A reference of the ques- 
tion to Gen. Sherman settled the whole matter, for he gave it his un- 
qualified approval. The writer has had several original receipts 
loaned him, showing that at least ninety-four different persons 
availed themselves of the opportunity. Later we had the conven- 
ience of Adams Express Company, of which something will be written 
later on. 

On the same 6th November the rebel Gen. Gatlin, at Golds- 
borough, N. C, reported to his War Department the finding of a 
note near wreck of steamer Union (of our fleet) , directing the cap- 
tain to proceed to Port Royal if he got separated from the fleet. 

The paying of our regiment was not completed until the 6th. 
A diary of that date said : " Nothing is yet heard from the Ocean 
Express, which has all our most valuable ordnance and ordnance 
stores on board." The captain and crew of the wrecked Peerless 
came in the 6th. 



Nov. '61.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 57 

The attack of the Oth — hardl}^ worthy the dignified name of 
attack — was promptly reported by the rebels to Richmond, and 
stated the fleet to be about tifty sail, etc. Gov. Pickens of South 
Carolina, in great trepidation, reported that the fleet had passed the 
batteries, and asked for more arms. 

The Seneca was sent in to the blockading fleet oft" Charleston, 
for the Susquehanna, to assist in taking Port Royal; and the Van- 
dalia was subsequently obtained from ofl" Savannah. 

The soundings for course of our fleet in the attack were made 
in the Vixen by Com. DuPont, Fleet Capt. Davis and Mr. Boutelle 
of the Coast Survey, and the channel perfectly located. All the 
buoys had been removed by the rebels. 

An interesting account, by Capt. (then Lieut.) Ayer, of the 
trip from Fortress Monroe, is full of interest and worthy of insertion. 



FORTRESS MONROE TO PORT ROYAL. 

[Extract from letter of Capt. (then Lieut.) Ayer.] 

Off Hatteras, Oct. 30, 1861 (Wednesday). 

We are about 40 miles from land .... accompanied by the whole 

expedition. The whole number is 48, and 33 are now in sight The 

old steamer Governor, that used to run from Boston to the Kennebec, is 

Avith us The great steamship VanderbiU has one full regiment on 

board and several companies of another. She is towing the Great Bepnhlir, 
with 500 horses on board .... the sailing ships are towed by the steam- 
ers. The principal war ship .... the Wabash .... is right ahead of us. 
.... It is getting rough, and the small gunboats are beginning to pitch and 
roll badly. One, the Ottavxi, is rolling fearfully, and the sea breaks over her. 

Oct. 3 1 : Great anxiety was felt yesterday for some of the gunboats 
that could not keep up .... about 3 p.m. yesterday our ship turned right 
about and went back to look them up, and found them before dark .... 
took one in tow .... the other refused. The latter, the Isaac Smith, is 

with us this morning 12 m.: We are again on the back track to hunt 

up five more 1 p.m. : We have lost sight of the fleet 4 p.m. : 

We have found the rest of our fleet .... found the great steamship UJi- 
nois, with part of her smoke stack gone and a sailing vessel in tow .... 
off'ered assistance and it -was refused. Evening : We have all steam on and 

will probably overtake the fleet by morning The Atlantic is said to 

be 288 feet long, 48 feet across, including paddle-boxes, and 50 feet deep in 
the hold. 

Nov. 1 : We caught up with the fleet at three this morning Re- 
porters onboard: JVew York Tribune — Mortimer Thompson, " Doesticks;"' 
Nev: York Herald, also [name not given — D. E.] 

Nov. 3 — Sunday morning: .... we have experienced a tremendous 
gale .... which has blown our fleet God only knows where. Only seven 
vessels of our fleet in sight .... yesterday morning the little steamer 
Mayjloiver .... Avas seen with signals of distress, and our ship at once 
steered in that direction and found her .... Avith upper works badly stove 
.... the sea SAveeping clean over her main deck. We took her in tOAv and 
she is Still at our stern. One gunboat had broken her rudder chains and 
lost her boAV gun overboard, staving the buhvarks as it Avent over. This 
Avas night before last ; and she has not been seen since. The sea was so 
rough Ave could not help her. The commotion Avas terrible ; and if our 
ship had struck her it Avould have dashed her to pieces .... am sorry to 
say the measles has got among us. 

Nov. 4 — Monday morning: We have made the land, and the great 
.... Wabash has anchored .... vessels coming in sight and coming in at 
intervals 1p.m.: The fleet has nearly all arrived .... t\\Q Governor 



58 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Nov. '61. 

has gone down with tAveuty marines on board .... the Fiftieth Pennsyl- 
vania threw their arms overboard, and one company of another regiment 

did the same Evening : All onr smaller vessels of war steamed in 

. . . . and fired one by one .... very soon three steamers .... came out 
and opened fire on our vessels .... they soon found more than they bar- 
gained for and retreated. About a dozen of our little gunboats chased them 
a short distance .... Gen. Sherman has sent to Charleston tonight for 
the Sabine and Vaiidalia, of the blockading fleet, and they are expected here 

by morning 10 p.m. : The pilot of this ship has just returned in a 

small boat from the scene of action, and says one of the rebel steamers is a 
flat boat. She ventured up nearer than the others, as she could run in shoal 
Avater ; and one of our shells burst directly over her, and probably killed 
several of her crew .... and one of the others was struck twice .... 
when out of range one was taken in tow by the others 

Nov. 5 : The two ships from Charleston have arrived .... some of 
our gunboats in cruising aboiat Avere fired at from batteries on shore. 

Nov. G : All quiet. 

Nov. 7 : . . . . [the fight described] .... we put one regiment on 
shore tonight, and I went in charge of one of the boats .... could not 
reach the shore by 30 or 40 rods 

Nov. 8 : There is a vessel of war going to New York this afternoon. 

THE STORM. 

[Extract from the Memoirs of D. E.] 
Our. fleet Avas scattered. A few put back to Fort Monroe. Some ran 
out to sea. Others went to the bottom, after nearly outriding the storm. 
The old Atlantic, which Avas considered the most staunch craft of the fleet, 
Avas tossed about like an egg shell. The barrels of pork and beef in the 
hold were throAvn from side to side Avith such force that it really seemed as 
if Ave should be stove. During the day, the scene was a grand one. The 
waves ran mountains high. Sometimes, when upon a high wave, we could 
see several of the smaller crafts struggling for life with the invisible foe, 
with signals of distress flying that could not be answered — as no vessel 
could safely approach another in such a storm, lest both go to the bottom. 
This scene Avould be suddenly cut ofi" by our noble steamer sinking beloAv 
everything visible, and the Avails of the sea upon either side would seem 
ready to fall inward, and engulf us; and again, as suddenly, we Avould be 
raised to a point overlooking the sad sight before mentioned. We were 
thus situated for tAvo days and three nights, Avith death staring us in the 
face; and Ave knew He was Avorking fearfully near us. 



FLEET CASUALTIES. 



Wir^Jiekl Scott : A new iron steamer ; barely escaped. 500 men 
of the Fiftieth Pennsylvania on board. Five feet of water in the 
hold. Two rifled guns and cargo were thrown overboard. The 
masts were cut away, and a boat sent to the Bienville with the wife 
of one of the officers, and three disabled soldiers. This boat had 
but ♦just deliA^ered its freight when it was SAvamped. A life-boat was 
then sent by the Bienville, and tried to save a load, consisting of the 
chief engineer and third assistant engineer and a few soldiers ; but the 
boat SAvamped. The Bienville then came alongside, and about twenty 
men saved themselves by jumping on board. About forty Avere 
saved, after the storm abated. Sunday evening, the Vanderbilt 
took the Wivjield Scott in tow, to Port Royal. The soldiers on 
board, when the order was giA^en to throw guns overboard, misun- 
derstood it, and some 300 threw over their guns and overcoats, too. 



Xov. '61.] THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 59 

3IayJiower : Capt. Phillips. Considerably iujurecl. Taken in 
tow by the Atlantic. 

Mercury : One of her two rifled guns thrown overboard. 

I.mac Smith: Threw overboard her eight 8-inch guns. 

Florida: Machinery disabled. Put back. 

Union: A new steamer; Capt. J.I. Sawin. Went ashore off 
Beaufort, N. C. The crew, passengers and soldiers all (73) lauded 
safely and were taken prisoners. The cargo in part was horses, 
a few of which were saved. 

Osceola: Ran ashore on the Day Breaker, off North Island, 
near Georgetown, N. C. Several of the 39 beeves reached the shore. 
The officers and crew (20) took boats to North Island, and were 
taken prisoners. 

Governor: Taken in tow, about 10 a.m., by the Isaac SmitJi, 
and the tow lost by carelessness. Another hawser was made fast 
about 1 P.M. The propeller bark, Young Bover, otfered to assist, 
but was unable to do so. Again the hawser parted. The Young 
Bover then signalled to the Sabine, which came near and anchored. 
The Governor also dropped anchor. A hawser was then made fast, 
and later in the evening the two vessels were brought near each 
other, stern and stern, and spars were rigged, and about 30 men 
were rescued. Afterward they came alongside and about forty 
saved themselves by jumping on the Sabine. 

Peerless: Sunk, after colliding with the Star of the South, and 
crew saved by the Mohican. 

Belviclere : Put back to Fort Monroe. 

(A special account of this later on.) 

Commodore Perry : Put back to Fort Monroe. 

Ethan Allen: Put back to Fort Monroe. 

Great Bejniblic : The Vanderbilt cast her off at 10 p.m., first 
night of storm. One poor fellow was crushed to death. Of the 350 
marines, all were saved except one corporal and six men, drowned 
and crushed. 

AVe have now reached the point where the evening shadows of 
the 6th of November have fallen upon us. Tomorrow, my dear 
rebels, will play havoc with j'our fortunes. Look sharp ! 



PORT ROYAL — THE FIGHT. 

At the signal, on the morning of 7 Nov., that portion of the 
armed fleet previously selected, silently and quickly formed in line 
as follows, and proceeded to the work assigned («". e., that of reducing 
Forts Walker and Beauregard) : Wabash, Susquehanna, Mohican, 
Seminole, Pawnee, Unadilla, Ottcnca, Pembina, Isaac Smith, towing 
the Vandcdia. These formed what might be termed the advance. 
These were immediately followed by a flanking squadron, as fol- 
lows : Bienville, Seneca, Curlew, Penguin, Augusta. These latter 
were of lighter draft, and were to be used outside of the "circular 
path " of the main squadron, should occasion require. As these various 



60 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Nov. '61. 




FORT WALKER. 



vessels of war successively fell into line and moved majesticall}^ 
fonvard, the sight was a most beautiful one, and long to be remem- 
bered. The stately Tr«&o.s//, with its heroic 
DuPont, as it almost silently moved for- 
ward, leading its train of war-bent ships, 
seemed to feel a conscious pride, and ap- 
parently to say, " I am the monarch of all 
I survey, and will soon deliver to j^ou the 
forts you so covet." 

How was it with the transports ? Each 
fairly looked like a "swarming of bees." 
The troops, eager to see all, were upon 
evei'y available part of the several vessels, 
from masthead to bowsprit, from paddlebox 
to martmgale ; and they struggled for place, 
too. To be sure, they felt a substantial safety; for we were anchored 
at a safe distance, beyond the reach of any rebel gun ; but after the 
fighting was begun and the debris came floating past, borne upon 
the outgoing tide, not a few thoughts of possible torpedoes were 
given expression. The WabasJi had a peculiar appearance that 
morning, to us who had never seen a naval fight. The boys said 
she had her " sleeves rolled up." All the extra spars, yards, top- 
masts, etc., had been taken in, and in some respects she looked like 
a partially dismantled ship. She was simply gotten ready for action. 

, Boom ! How every eye 
H was strained to see where 
and with what effect it 
struck. Broadsides that 
made the earth, and air 
too, tremble, interested 
us very much. The 
stately Wabash led the 
line, first up to Fort 
Beauregard, on the right 
or northerly side of the 
entrance to Port Royal, 
the particular spot being 
designated as Bay Point. 
When exactly opposite, a 
broadside was sent in, 
i with DuPont's compli- 
ments. Each in turn 
delivered its shot and 
shell, making the sand 
fiy. This was all the 
boys on the ships could 
see as to effect of the 
fire. After thus saluting Beauregard, the old Wabash gracefully 
turned to the left and swept around to Fort Walker, on the left or 
southerly side of the entrance, the" spot being the northeasterly end 




62 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Nov. '61. 

of Hilton Head Island. Fort Walker received the same treatment as 
its sister across the bay. To be sure, both forts replied ; but the 
damage they did was so slight as not to impede the progress of our 
fighting squadron. Again the majestic Wabash SAvept to the left 
and swung around to Fort Beauregard, the consorts following. 
This movement, it will be observed, was nearly in a circle ; but an 
ellipse is more nearly correct. At first the men on the transports 
endeavored to give expression to their approval of each shot and 
what it had probably accomplished ; but the shots became so fre- 
quent and abundant, too, that to individualize them were well-nigh 
impossible. Whenever during the fight there was a time the firing 
was slow, the men found their throats, and cheers went up almost 
suflBcient to deafen the man at the mast-head. Language is entirely 
inadequate to faithfully describe the fight. To stand at a safe dis- 
tance and fairly view a terrific fight, like that at Port Royal, was 
indeed an enjoyable feast and made a lasting impression. The 
bare mention of "Port Royal," or even the sight of the words in 
print, instantly awakens in the mind and memory of every man who 
saw that memorable battle unspeakable emotions. 
Of the fight, DuPont said : — 

Sights adjusted at 550 yards Signal to get under way at 8 a.m. 

... at 8.10, the Wabash started .... at 9.26, the first gun from Fort 
Walker, and second by Beauregard .... then by Wahasli, and next the 
Susquehanna., .... and so on, .... at 11.30, Fort Walker's flag shot 
away, .... at 1.15, the OWaca signalled that Fort Wall^er was abandoned 

. . ." . Signal repeated a few minutes later by the Pembina Sent 

Comdr. Rodgers with flag of truce, and he hoisted the Union flag over Fort 
Walker at 2.20 .... at 2.45 the Wabash anchored, and Comdr. C. R. P. 
Rodgers w^as sent on shore with marines. The transports then came up 
rapidly, and Brig.-Gen. Wright's brigade landed by nightfall .... flag 

hoisted over Beauregard next morning, by Lieut. Comdr. Ammen 

The Wabash passed five times between the forts. 



THE CONFEDERATE DEFENCES. 

FORT WALKER. 

The commanding officer was Gen. T. F. Drayton. His brother 
commanded the Federal gunboat Pocahontas, one of the bombarding 
fleet. The troops in and about the fort were the Fifteenth South 
Carolina, three companies of the Ninth South Carolina, a part of the 
Twelfth South Carolina, the Georgia Volunteers, Capt. Reed's Bat- 
tery, and two companies of Wagner's South Carolina Artillery. 

FORT BEAUREGARD. 

The commanding officer was Col. R. G. M. Dunovant. The 
troops in and about the works were 640 men of the Twelfth South 
Carolina, and the Beaufort Volunteer Artillery. Fort Beauregard 
had 24 guns, and the outer work 6 guns. 

CONFEDERATE FLEET. 

Commodore (?) Josiah Tatnall, with eight steamers. 



Nov. '61.'] 



THIRl^ NEAV HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



63 



SKUt-uCRfct^ 




THE PORT ROYAL FIGHT. 

(Showing]to a greater uicety the path of the attacking squadron.) 



64 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Nov. '61. 

CASUALTIES AND INCIDENTS. 

An 80-pouud shot went through the mainmast of the WabasJi 
without disabling it. Fleet loss, 8 killed, 23 wounded. The Wa- 
bdjsh was struck 34 times, the Pawnee 9 times, the Bienville 5 times. 

Note found at Bay Point : — 

Bay Point, Nov. 7, 1861, 5 p.m. 
Twelfth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers. I am compelled to 
leave some poor felloAvs who cannot be removed. Treat them kindly. Let 
your motto be, " ignaros mail miseros succurrere disc." After the other fort 
had fallen, we preferred leaving our untenable position, to assist in estab- 
lishing the Southern Confederacy to better purposes than we can in Fort 
Lafayette. Stkphex Elliott, Col. Com'd'g 

South Carolina Vols, and Fort Beauregard. 

The retreat from Fort Walker was so hasty, they scattered their 
arms and equipments all along the roads and about the steamboat 
landing at Seabrook, and hundreds were afterward picked up by our 
men. Several men were pushed overboard and drowned at Sea- 
brook. 

The steam gunboat Pocahontas, Comdr. Percival Drayton 
(brother of the rebel commander on shore), came in late, having been 
detained by the storm, but took part in the latter part of the en- 
gagement, the two brothers exchanging iron compliments. 

In the house used as. the rebel headquarters, after Comdr. 
Rodgers had raised the American flag upon it, a sailor stumbled 
over and broke a wire leading to a torpedo. An explosion followed 
and the sailor was knocked senseless, though not much injured. 

The first man killed in the fight was a sailor named Thomas 
Jackson, on the Wabash ; and when the report of casualties reached 
the North, many ei-roneously supposed our Sergt.-Maj. Thomas M. 
Jackson was the man. 

The rebel commander at Wilmington notified his War Depart- 
ment On the 7th that he had sent one regiment and one battery to 
Charleston. 

From M. Quad, in "Field, Fort and Fleet," we glean as fol- 
lows : — 

Aside from the forts. Port Royal was defended by a " fleet " of six or 
eight nondescript craft, on which guns had been mounted, and which were, 
for convenience sal^e, called gunboats. The fleet was under command of 
Com. Tatnall. . . . his title to "Commodore" was never justified by cir- 
cumstances or surroundings On the 4th of November .... Tatnah 

moved boldly down .... and gave battle. DuPont's flagship, the old 
Wabash, could have sunk Tatnall's whole fleet. Tatnall fired a few rounds, 
received a dozen or more shots in exchange, and concluded not to sink the 
Federal fleet that day. Again, on the 5th, he moved down, opened fire, and 
this time had splinters knocked about his ears before he retreated. After 
he was chased behind the forts he was not again thought of until after 
Hilton Head was in Federal possession. Had his fleet been in the way, it 
Avould have been sent to the bottom to save sailing through it Con- 
federate oflicials had inspected the forts and asserted that they could sink 
any vessel attempting to sail between, .... now came the test .... in- 
fantry was stationed .... along the beach to prevent Sherman from 




a. 


Battery Branuan. 


b. 


" Brown. 


c. 


" Viele. 


d. 


" Wright. 




Fort Sherman. 


/■ 


Battery Stevens. 


y- 


Terry. 


h. 


" Williams. 


A. 


Fort Howell. 


B. 


" Welles. 


a. 


" Hunter. 


D. 


Drayton's Plantation. 


E. 


Elliott's 


F. 


Seabrook's 


0. 


Pinckney Island. 


H. 


Jenkins' 



Bull Island. 
Daufuskie Island. 
Braddock's Point. 
Baynard's Plantation. 
Laioton's " 

Spanish Wells. 
Point Comfort. 
'Possum Point. 
Hill Plantation. 
Lemington " 
Muddy Creek. 
Hog Island. 
Brick Yard. 
Cherry Hill. 
Matthews' Plantation. 
Springfield " 
Cotton Hope. 



Battery Mttchel. 

Third New Hampshire (first camp). 

" " {camp 1862-63). 

" " (camp 1863, 

Pinckney Id.) 
" (camp 1864, mounted). 
General Hospital. 
Otter Hole. 
Gardner's Plantation. 
Honey Horn. 
Sand Hill. 
Grassy Lawn. 
Mitchelville. 
Coggins' Point. 
Fairfield's " 
Battery Holbrook. 



y„v. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. Go 

thro-sving .... troops on shore The few shot -which fell among the 

fleet were aimed too high for serious damage .... two guns in Walker and 
one in Beauregard dismounted themselves, injuring a dozen men, and the 

tirst broadside from the fleet dismounted two or three more The 

shells in Walker were found to be too large for the Parrotts, and fuses were 
found defective .... the fleet could throw grapeshot as far as the Con- 
federates could throw shells and at a broadside from the fleet the Confed- 
erates had to fall flat to escape the iron hail. Fort Walker had a gun dis- 
abled every twenty minutes. In Beauregard, one shell from the Wahash 
wounded eleven men. The 3S guns in the two forts had been reduced to 30 
in the flrst half hour, and of these only 22 could be trained on the fleet. At 
half-past one the officers of Fort Walker determined to evacuate. At that 
time notf more than five guns Avere in working condition. The decision to 
vacate caused a panic and the guns were left Avithout beiug spiked, as is 
usual. Even a large f|uantity of ordnance and quartermaster's stores, on 
the Avliarf , which could easily have been destroyed, were left untouched. 
One of the last shots from the fleet blew up the hot shot furnace of Fort 
Walker. The Wabash alone could have whipped both forts. Nothing but 
shiftlessness prevented both forts from being fully garrisoned and provided 
with proper shelters. Sherman could have landed and captured every Con- 
federate ; and yet his orders were against it. 



SHERMAN'S REPORT. 

Gen. Sherman made his report on the 8th, the substance of 
which was as follows : After repeating what may be found substan- 
tially repeated in other parts of the history, he says the original plan 
of attack — army and navy combined — had to be set aside in con- 
sequence of the loss, during the voyage, of the greater portion of 
the means of disembarkment ; and, coupled with this, the fact that 
the only practicable place* to land was found to be five or six miles 
from the anchoring place of the transports. He says : I was a mere 

spectator of the combat I deem the performance a masterly 

one Too much praise cannot be awarded to the science and 

skill exhibited by the Flag Officer [DuPont] and the officers con- 
nected with his ships. The island was strewn for miles with arms, 
accoutrements and baggage of the rebels. 

Gen. Sherman issued a proclamation to the people of South 
Carolina, urging them to return to their allegiance. 

Sherman's Supplementary Report (11 Nov. 'Gl) says, in sub- 
stance : Fifty-two pieces of ordnance have fallen into our hands, all 
large, with fine carriages, except eight or nine injured [ruined] by 
our fire. Two fine 12-pounder howitzers were found abandoned 
near the ferry, about six miles distant. On clearing up the fort at 
Hilton Head, the dead body of the Surgeon [Buist] was found in 
one of the galleries. He had been killed and buried simultaneously • 
by the explosion of a shell. He was formerly an iVssistant-Surgeon 
in the U. S. army. Every white inhabitant has left the island. 
Am now in possession of the forts on Hilton Head [Fort Walker, 
and one at Braddock's Point, south end of island] and two on 
Phillips Island. The unloading of our vessels is very tedious, slow 
and difficult, owing to the extended shallow shores, there being no 
wharves. Expect to leave here with a large force as soon as our 
defences are fully under way, to carry out the grand objects of the 
expedition. 



66 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xov. '61. 

PORT ROYAL. — CONFEDERATE ACCOUNT. 

Gen. Drayton's official report has the following : Distance be- 
tween Forts Walker and Beauregard, 2f miles. He left his head- 
quarters at Beaufort by steamer, reaching Bay Point at 6 p.m., 
4 Nov., passing Tatnall's fleet on the way. He remained at Ba}' 
Point till 1.30 a.m., 5 Nov., in consultation with Col. Dunnovant, 
commanding at that post. He then went to Tatnall's fleet, consult- 
ing with Tatnall, and thence to Hilton Head, landing at daylight. 
He then sent a courier to Braddock's Point to order up Capt. Stuart's 
company of the Ninth South Carolina, to be sent to Bay Point, via 
Fort Walker. This company did not leave till the 6th, arriving at 
Fort ^\"alker same day. The company started on the morning of the 
7th, on the Emma of Tatnall's fleet, for Fort Beauregard (Bay Point) ; 
but when half-way across were cut off by the advance of DuPout 
and driven into Skull Creek, where the company disembarked [and 
presumably returned to Fort Walker, via Seabrook. — D. E.] 

On the 6th, Fort Walker — until re-inforced from Savannah — 
had 2 companies First South Carolina, 152 men; 3 companies 
Ninth South Carolina, 210 men; and 4 companies Twelfth South 
Carolina, 260 men: total, 622. 65 men of Capt. J. H. Scriven's 
mounted guerrillas, acting as scouts and couriers, were stationed on 
the l)each, easterly of Fort Walker, at Camp Lookout. Fort 
Walker was re-inforced on the 6th, at 4 p.m., by 450 infantry under 
Capt. Berry, and a batter}^ of two 12-pouuder howitzers with 50 
men. Two hours later the Fifteenth South Carolina, with 650 men, 
landed at Seabrook Wharf, vSkull Creek. 

Gen. Drayton then proceeded to describe the fight, and erro- 
neously called the Wahasli the Miniiesota. The retreat began about 
3 p.m., toward Ferry Point, about 6 miles oft", the Fifteenth South 
Carolina and the battery bringing up the rear. 

At 1.30 A.M., the 8th, by tlie aid of Com. Tatnall's fleet, the 
steamers St. John and Edisto, and three large flats, holding 150 men 
each, left the island, without provisions or ammunition, except what 
was in their guns or cartridge boxes. Some boxes of arms, which 
had been left on the wharf the night before by Col. Saussure's regi- 
ment — belonging to sick men — could have been saved, and also a 
box of swords ; but the captains of the Edisto and the St. John re- 
fused to take them on board, after being ordered to do so. 

The force on Bay Point was 640 men of Col. Dunnovant's 
Twelfth South Carolina. 149 of whom were in Fort Beauregard under 
Capt. Elliott of the Ninth South Carolina. Gen. Drayton says 
the wharf at Seabrook was nearly completed when the enemy began 
the attack, but in its incomplete state it performed successful ser- 
vice. The flat and two troop boats arrived at Jenkins Island Ferry 
in time to assist in embarking the trooj^s in retreat. Three other 
similar boats were sent at the same time to White Hall Ferry and 
assisted to perform the same service for Col. Dunnovant's troops 
(Bay Point). Gen. Drayton says he had prepared a set of sig- 
nals by flag, and only needed a few more days to complete the same, 
when the attack was made. 



Nov. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 67 

Notwithstanding the prompt measures adopted by Col. Duuno- 
vant to effect his retreat, in the direction of the Narrows, it is sur- 
prising, says Gen. Drayton, tliat, witli the knowledge possessed 
by the enemy — through Mr. Boutelle and others of the Coast Sur- 
vey^ Col. Dunnovant's retreat was not intercepted by gunboats 
passing up toward Beaufort; and mine (Gen. Drayton's) by 
steamers taking passage through Skull Creek, toward the ferry 
landings. Why they did not adopt this course, says Gen. Dra}"- 
ton, must be left to time to explain. He gives the losses : — 

Missinir. 





Killed. 


Wounded 


Fort Walker 


10 


20 


Outside of same .... 


1 


15 


Fort Beauregard .... 


_ 


13 


Outside of same (3 sick). 






Total, 66. 







Before the sun was fairl}' up on the 8th, Bay Point was occu- 
pied by Lieut. -Comdr. Ammen of the navy, with a squad of marines. 
They found no one there to oppose them. The rebels had destroyed 
their surplus powder by throwing it into the moat, and of the guns, 
about tweuty-tive in all, only three were found spiked. 

The rebel Gen. Ripley oflicially notified the War Department, 
8 Nov., that the enemy took Port Royal on the 7th, and that Gen. 
Lee had arrived. This of course was one day late for that remark- 
able gentleman to see the fun. Lee assumed command the 8th, and 
announced his staff". 

The same day, also, Capt. Gillmore (afterward General) made 
a reconnoissance of Hilton Head Island with escort of Seventh 
Connecticut, 900 men, under Col. Terry (afterward General), 
under orders of Gen. Wright of same date, and proceeded first to 
Seabrook, six miles across the island, to ascertain best positions 
for batteries to control water communications, via Skull Creek, 
between Charleston and Savannah. They started at 11 a.m., ancl 
threw out skirmishers, reaching Seabrook at 2 p.m., without seeing 
any eneni}^ or even a white man. They there learned that about 
300 of the enemy, with wounded, passed over the same road during 
the previous night. There were found on the road, knapsacks, 
haversacks, canteens, cartridge boxes, etc., scattered all along the 
road and on the wharf at Seabrook, ^here they embarked in retreat. 
A number of muskets and bayonets also were found at the landing. 
There was also found near the landing fifteen to eighteen large 
wagon loads of bacon, hard bread, sugar, rice, corn, vinegar, etc. 
Two loads were brought in by the party. Capt. Gillmore further 
said he found an excellent position at Seabrook for a battery, and 
said a battery of five or six guns would be sulHeient to close the 
inland passage; but to insure it against surprise, he recommended 
an enclosed work, say for 1,000 men; and it should be begun at 
once. Thought fifteen guns would be enough. The wharf, he 
said, required repairs. No post ofiflce at Seabrook. The roads were 
good, but materials can best be taken to Seabrook by water. 



68 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xor. '6?7. 

A diary shows that our regiment had a detail rowing boats the 
8th, in landing Stevens' Brigade at Bay Point. 

On the 9th, Private Amasa Niles of Co. G died on ship- 
board, of fever. The Chaplain's diary of the 9th said: "We 
buried him today. We took his body from the steamer after all 
had left : and ten of us went in a boat ; and far away on the beach, 
under a palm [he meant palmetto] tree, had services and buried his 
body. I laid a green palm bush [palmetto] on his grave, and 
silently went away." 

The Third New Hampshire landed the 9th, and went into camp 
in a cotton field, pulling up the cotton to make room for tents. To 
get on shore — to plant our feet on the other fellows' heath — was ex- 
hilarating, inspiring; and the boys capered about like young colts. 

On landing, Co. E was sent out skirmishing, and visited two 
plantations, staying at one of them over night. 

Capt. Saxton, Chief Quartermaster, reported the 9th to Gen. 
Meigs, Quartermaster-General, in substance as follows : All the 
vessels chartered b}^ him in New York have arrived safely. After 
briefly summarizing the victory won, said all the stores have to be 
landed through the surf — a tedious operation — and detaining large 
steamers a long time. Said he had made requisition on Col. Tomp- 
kins, Quartermaster at New York, for a steamer, pile driver, scow 
and plank to build needed wharf, and asked the Quartermaster- 
General's approval. He suggested the keeping of two or three first- 
class steamers like the Atlardic and Baltic constantly running between 
Port Eoyal and New York. In two days, he said 150 contraband 
negroes had come in ; and it would soon be necessary to furnish 
them with coarse clothing. 

Gen. Meigs approved and endorsed all contained in Capt. 
Saxton's letter, under date of 15th, and the Secretary of War 
approved; and it was decided, under date of 16th (the Quarter- 
master-General advising it) that the Atlantic and Baltic be purchased 
instead of chartered. 

Almost the entire regiment detailed on the 10th to work at 
beach in unloading vessels. Sunday could not be observed at that 
time as a day of rest. No sermon first Sunday on shore. Ther- 
mometer, 80°. The men worked very hard for forty-eight hours, — 
not continually, but nearly so, — and ate but little, as rations and 
cooking had not yet got into shape. 

Gen. Sherman on the same day issued two important orders, 
the first directing the daily calls (routine) and forbade drill on 
Sundays ; the second directed the First Brigade's (ours) pickets 
to cover from the shore north of fort to head of creek on its (our) 
left ; the Second Brigade's pickets to cover from creek to the woods 
and marsh on its left ; the Third Brigade's pickets to cover and ob- 
serve the road leading to Braddock's Point, south of Broad Creek, 
also the shore on its left. The Third Ehode Island to furnish 
two non-coms, and fifteen men to observe the shore north of the 
fort. All guards to be mounted at 4 p.m. He further directed that 



Nov. '61.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. G9 

until the heavy details for fatigue duty are over, drills and parades 
will be confiued to a compan}' parade and inspection of arms at 8 
A.M. daily, and then company drill till 9.80. 

The rebel Gen. Lawton, at Savannah, said he had only 5,500 
troops all told; also 3,000 men indifferently armed and drilled, near 
by and can be called. 

The rebel Gen. Trapier, at Charleston, asked authorit}^ the 
same day to declare martial law at Charleston. This looked a little 
like demoralization. 

HILTON HEAD. 

A private letter written after landing, says : — 

.... Here we are, surrounded by cotton, sweet potatoes, corn, beans, 
mules, oranges, palmetto trees. Southern pines, niggers, palm and peanuts, 
with here and there a live oak. Our camp .... is a cotton field of some 
300 acres .... a portion lias been picked once or twice, and is now more 
than ready to be picked again .... negroes say four or five pickings, as it 
does not ripen evenly .... we are a mile from the fort [Walker] .... 
sweet potato fields near by ... . took a party of four yesterday [Nov. II] 
and went exploring, about 8 miles, to the Ferry .... the island is one 
great pine plain, interrupted only by an occasional swampy run. All pine 
woods except here and there a plantation with its mansion house for the 
master and any number of huts for the slaves. 

Under date of the 11th, Gen. Sherman made a further report, 
the substance of which was that 52 pieces, mostly heavy, have fallen 
into our hands, all with fine carriages except eight or nine, ruined 
by our fire. Besides the wreck of smaller arms thrown awa}' .... 
in hasty retreat .... a light battery of two fine 12-pounder howit- 
zers has been found near the ferry [Seabrook], six miles distant. 
.... The flight extended to Braddock's Point, fifteen miles 
distant. The fort there was deserted and its guns spiked. It has 
one 10-inch Columbiad and two 5.J-inch guns. On clearing out the 
fort [Walker], the dead body of Dr. Buist, formerly an Assistant 
Surgeon in the army, was found [killed by a shell and buried by 
the falling earth] . He was the principal surgeon at the fort. 

Gov. Pickens of South Carolina asked his Secretary of War 
for more arms, and predicted that Stouo (Inlet) would be the point 
of (our) attack upon Charleston, and that it would not take place 
for weeks yet. 

On this 11th day of November we will introduce Gov. Brown 
of Georgia to the reader, as that was the day he notified his Secretary 
of War that Savannah was menaced and asked for more men and 
guns. He was a scarey fellow, as will be seen later on. 



THE RECEIPT OF THE NEWS AT THE NORTH. 

The Bienville, a very fast gunboat (one of our fleet, and of the 
attacking squadron) , was selected to carry the good news to the 
expectant North. Left Hilton Head Sunday morning, 10 Nov., 
and arrived at New York at 7 p.m., 13 Nov. (Wednesday evening), 
touching at Fort Monroe to land the Captain (who went at once to 



70 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Nov.'Gl. 

Washington with despatches), Mr. S. S. Boutelle of the Coast 
Survey, and Lieut. Wyman of the Paumee, on sick list. During 
Wednesday night, in New York City at least, type-setting, printing, 
telegraphing, etc., must have been very lively : for the next morn- 
ing's papers were almost filled with the stirring, startling and 
cheering news. 

The correspondents had done their work well and were deserving 
of much credit. To their very full accounts the writer is indebted 
for many important details, and this acknowledgment must stand 
as " giving them credit." 

The JSfew York Herald, 14 Nov. '61, said: "The complete suc- 
cess of our great naval expedition on the waters of Port Eoyal and 
Beaufort, South Carolina, marks, according to our anticipations, 
the beginning of a new campaign against this colossal, reckless and 
desperate Southern rebellion .... Not one of all the numerous 
battles, bomliardments and skirmishes of this war presents a more 
inglorious running aAvay than was in this case achieved by the self- 
conceited and blustering chivalry of South Carolina .... We 
may expect the immediate return of the transports of our great 
squadron to ... . take down another column of ten or fifteen 
thousand soldiers to Gen. Sherman, and so on till he shall have 
been sufficiently re-inforced for an overland movement upon 
Charleston or Savannah .... We are now practically com- 
mencing to put down the rebellion." 

How the news stirred the North ! With what eagerness the 
papers were scanned ! Many looked only at the cold fact that 
Port Royal was taken. But how eagerly and tenderly the mother, 
the father, or sister, or wife, looked hastily through the " casualties " 
list ; for though elated at the victory, the bare thought that a loved 
one had perished in the storm, or had sacrificed his life in the fight, 
or would be borne home maimed, was uppermost ; and they needed to 
know the worst. What a sigh of relief went up when it was fully 
shown that the casualties were so few ! That so much had been 
accomplished and so little sacrificed ! The storm itself had had its 
effect at home ; and as the mere bits of news of this or that vessel 
lost reached th6 press, it would have created no great additional 
mental suffering had the news come that almost the entire fleet had 
gone to the bottom. 

COL. JOHN A. WAGENER'S REPORT. 

Under date of the 11th, Col. John A. Wagener, who was in 
command at Fort Walker on the 7th, reported substantially as fol- 
lows : He makes the report from Charleston, and begins by allud- 
ing [in sorrow, probably] to the fatiguing retreat from Hilton Head, 
and calls the 7th a disastrous day. Said his right channel battery, 
Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 guns, was served by the German Artillery, 
Co. A, Capt. D.Werner. Left channel battery, Nos. 10, 11, 12 
and 13, was served by Co. C, Ninth [actually the Eleventh] South 
Carolina Volunteers, Capt. Joseph Bedon. These were the front 
batteries, and both under Maj. A. M. Huger, First Artilleiy, South 



Xnr. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 71 

Carolina Militia. The flanking and rear guns were manned b}' de- 
tachments from Capts. Bedon's, Canaday's and White's companies of 
Ninth [actually the Eleventh] South Carolina Volunteers, all under 
Capt. Canaday. The reserve was under Capt. White. Said he 
directed the first gun himself (a 32-pounder), and had it loaded with 
a percussion shell ; but it exploded in front of the muzzle. The 
enemy had chosen a day entirely propitious to himself. The sea 
was as smooth as glass ; the air just sufficient to blow our smoke in 
our faces. Said the fleet fired with precision of target practice. 
His engineers made a great mistake in not doing as he had previously 
advised, i.e., in placing a battery on the bluff, which commanded his 
flank [this probably means toward Drayton's]. Says the enemy 
took position there and raked him. He quoted from Maj. Huger's 
report at this point, which says of the Wohash (which he erroneously 
called the Minnesota) : " She returned down our front, delivering a 
beautifully accurate fire at short range, supported at rather longer 
range by the fire of two other large ships of war." He then said : 
"So soon as these positions had been established, the fort was 
simply fought as a point of honor ; for from that moment we were 
defeated," etc. 

Col. Wageuer then continued his own report, saying that at 11 
A.M. it was reported to him that the Bay Point battery had been 
silenced; and from that time they (at Fort Walker) redoubled their 
exertions, etc. He said he was knocked down by a piece of shell, 
between 12 and 1, and stunned; and in consequence turned over the 
command of the fort to Maj. Huger, to get a few mimites' rest. A 
little after 1 p.m. Maj. Huger informed Col. Hey ward, commanding 
the island, that the ammunition was nearly gone ; and therefore it 
was decided b}' the general commanding to evacuate. Three sections 
of the German Artillery, under Capt. Harms, Lieut. Melchers and 
Orderly Bischoff, were detailed to continue a slow fire while the 
wounded were removed, and the garrison was ordered to retreat by 
disjyersion. About 2 o'clock, Maj. Huger ordered the last detachment 
from their guns. " The fort was gone, but our honor was saved." 
[Precisely what was meant by this is not apparent.] 

Of the channel battery only three guns were in condition to con- 
tinue the fight. He mentioned, among others, for conspicuous 
bravery : Lieut. J. p]. Heape, who saved a wounded man on the re- 
treat ; Mr. Carlsen of the German Artillery, who replaced the Con- 
federate flag on the ramparts in a storm of shot and shell ; Private 
Julius Wagener (his only son), a boy of 15, who replanted the Pal- 
metto banner on the ramparts where it had been shot down ; Private 
Geilfuss, German Artillery, who brought away the Palmetto flag ; 
Lieut. Melchers, who fired the last gun. He further said the entire 
force on the works was 220 men ; and these, he said, had to resist 
the overpowering array of 17 war vessels with nearly 400 guns of 
the best and heaviest calibre. 

Lender the circumstances of the retreat, nothing could be saved. 
The men had been working in their shirt sleeves, the sand had covered 
their knapsacks and muskets, sometimes two or three feet deep. 
Said his soldiers were entirely destitute, and should be cared for by 



72 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xnr. '61. 

the State. The officers have lost all, some even their swords. The 
Confederate flag was rent iuto so many shreds that no piece could be 
found. The Palmetto flag was saved and carried home, decorated, 
as he said, with many a token of the enemy's wrath. In conclusion 
he said he defended for five hours a position against the most scien- 
tific and bravest seaman, which had been pronounced by one of our 
[his] best generals and engineers as untenable. 



The times were peculiar. On the 11th, the Chaplain's diary 
said: " Sorted mail for whole expedition (our first mail). Com- 
pleted my tent. Turkey for dinner ; goose for supper. Must have 
been secesh, as I do not remember of bringing any. Our plague}^ 
mvde got away last night, and have had to back stuff up today." 

The rebel Secretary of War authorized Gen. Lee, the 11th, to 
utilize the entire resources of South Carolina and Georgia under con- 
trol of the government for his defence. It must be they must have 
thought we were likely to hitch a cable to the two States and that to 
our fleet and sail off with them in tow. 

Gen. Sherman issued an important order on the 11th, to the 
effect that he found depredations on private property had been com- 
mitted, etc. ; and all such must cease. He probably referred to the 
unlawful- seizing of hens, or to the misappropriation of pullets' eggs ! 
He certainly could n't object to a soldier having a mule. One face- 
tious fellow, on hearing of this order said, " Wat are we 'ere fur, 
anyhow? " 

The burial of Jacob Bartells of Co. H took place on the 12th, 
with military honors. A sad time. 

The Chaplain's diary of the 12th said: " For ten days I have 
been sick. The boys treat me very kindly ; have brought me a 
feather bed ; don't know where they got it ; have fixed ^iiy tent up 
nicely, and stay with me nights." 

The rebel Col. Dilworth, commanding at Fort Clinch, said he 
had on the 12th only 659 men for all Amelia Island, 20 miles long. 
The U. S. Avar vessels are in sight every day, he said. His arma- 
ment was 8 32-pounders, 2 24-pounders, 1 32-pounder rifled, 1 10- 
inch rifled, 3 8-inch Columbiads ; and he had 100 rounds for each gun. 

As a sanitary measure, Gen. Viele ordered that the men of his 
(First) bi'igade should be sent to the beach successively in squads of 
25, under a non-com., to bathe, but not directly after meals. 

Gen. Sherman also ordered same day, owing to the general 
looseness about the camps, that all persons absent from their regi- 
ments without passes should be arrested and sent to his headquarters ; 
also, that returns be made for October. 

KECONNOISSANCE TO BRADDOCK'S POINT. 

A report dated 12 Nov. shows that Capt. Gillmore, with Gen. 
Wright and staff, and an escort of five companies Seventh Connecti- 
cut, Col. Terry, went from Hilton Head on the evening of the 10th, 
and returned on the afternoon of the 11th. It says: "The party 



Nov. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 73 

reached Lawtou's, 4 miles from Braddock's Point, about midniglit. 
Halted till 4 a.m., 11th. The party reached the point where the 
road struck the beach, at daybreak, and halted. At daylight a com- 
pany was sent to reconnoitre, and it reported everj'thing abandoned ; 
and then all went forward. They found one battery with a 24- 
pounder gun, old pattern, on a siege carriage ; also a batter}' of one 
10-inch Columbiad on a new wrought- iron carriage, on a wooden plat- 
form with iron transverse circle. The parapet at that point was 263 
feet long and contained a good magazine and some ammunition. 
Three ordinary A tents were left standing, having been shaded by 
branches of trees set in poles. Braddock's Point could not," said 
C'apt. Gillmore, "be held by us without a considerable force, except 
by the active co-operation of the fleet, so as to enable us to control 
Calibogue Sound." 

The same day the rebel Secretary of AVar said to Gov. Brown 
of Georgia, that to comply with his request would be suicidal. That 
the government could not scatter its armies into fragments at the 
request of each governor who might be alarmed. Ha ! here was a 
cold shoulder! Gov. Brown frightened? Of course not. 

To Gen. Trapier's request for authority to proclaim martial law 
in Charleston, the Secretary of War replied that the Governor of the 
State must take the responsibility of ordering it, if at all. 

Quite a large detail, the 12th, cutting hard pine timber, proba- 
bly for some of the works to be erected near by. 

On the 13th, for the first time, we had a brigade guard mount 
at 4 P.M. 

At this point the writer finds the first intimation of working on 
the fortifications, and first reference to a wharf. (It must have 
been an improvised affair at that early date.) " Took mail to wharf 
this morning, pulled cotton this forenoon, and shovelled tonight," 
said a diarj^ 

Again Gov, Brown. He said 7,000 Enfield rifles had arrived 
(by blockade runners, of course), and he asked for half of them. 
The rebel government directed the same daj^ that only men enlisted 
for the whole war should be armed with the Enfield rifles, which 
came on the Fingal., recently arrived at Savannah. The Fivyal was 
an iron-clad steamer, and had a very valuable cargo of arms, etc. 
Gov. Pickens of South Carolina also heard of its arrival*; and he at 
once asked for part of its arms, concluding his appeal with these 
words, "Arm us and we are safe." Gov. Brown was replied to thus : 
" AVill give you all that can be spared. Remember the ten other gov- 
ernors are making just such remarks as yourself." Ten other govern- 
ors alarmed ! Truly the war was an interesting subject — for them. 

On the 13th, Gen. Sherman, finding it did n't work well, coun- 
termanded his order requiring persons arrested for absence without 
passes to be brought to his headquarters. He also directed that a 
General Officer of the Day be appointed, and a Brigade Guard 
Mount ; a General Police Officer and a Lieutenant to be appointed 
Aveekly ; a Provost Guard to be established, and appointed Maj. 
Beard, Forty-eighth New York, Provost Marshal. 



74 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xor. '61. 

Again the Fhvjal. Gov. Milton of Floridu asked for some of 
the arms, saying " Apalachicola is threatened." 

As proof that the (our) government was ready to accord praise, 
attention is invited to the fact (previously stated) as to the arrival 
North of an oflicer with despatches. He was landed at Fort Mon- 
roe, and hastened at once to Washington with the good news. On 
the very next day (14th) a general order was issued, as follows : — 

General Order Xo. 99 : 

Headquarters Army, Adjutant-Gexeral's Office, 
WASniN(TT0N, U Nov. 1861. 
The Major-General commanclinp: announces to the army Avith much 
pleasure : first, the brilliant reductions of the forts in Port Royal harl)or. 
by the officers and sailors of our gallant fleet, under the command of Flag 
Officer S. F. DuPont; the utter rout of the enemy, the capture of the town 
of Beaufort, and the landing of Brig. -Gen. T. W. Sherman's army on the 

coast of South Carolina The Major-General commanding cannot too 

highly extol the steadiness, courage and admirable conduct displayed by 
officers, sailors and soldiers alike in these several engagements. He com- 
mends them to the imitation of the whole array. 

By command of Maj.-Gen. Geo. B. McClellax. 
L. Thomas, 

Adjutant-General. 

Gen. Sherman issued an order the same day referring to fatigue 
details,, and directed that dress parade be in the morning, and that 
all orders be read at parade. He further directed that no sounds 
shall be made on the drums for calls, except such as the regulations 
require, and no drums to be beaten between taps and reveille, ex- 
cept the long roll call. All detachments, except the one at Brad- 
dock's Point, to be at once returned to their commands. 

A diary says : "We were turned out last night by report of a 
gun, the result being the killiug of a man in the P^ighth Maine." 

Trees were put up on the 14th all through the camp, for pro- 
tection from the sun. 

The Secretary of War (rebel) notified Gen. Lee the 14th, that 
the Fingal had 10,000 blankets and cannon on board; also, that he 
has a letter from a citizen of Charleston making complaint about 
matters there, and stated that the forts in the harbbr were in in- 
competent hands. That one Capt. Wagner was incompetent, 
neglectful and dissipated, never spending his nights at the forts, but 
in the city, in excesses and with persons of immoral character. 
Rather serious charge ; but we were not coimsel for Wagner. 

Gov. Brown again to the fore. On hearing there were four 
rifled cannon on the Fivgal, he said : " Do let us have two of them 
for fort [probably Pulaski. — D. E.] which lacks heavy guns." 

The names of the forts taken by us on the 7th were changed, 
by Gen. Sherman's General Order 29, of the 14th: Fort Walker, 
Hilton Head, to be called Fort Welles ; Fort Beauregard, Bay Point, 
to be called Fort Seward. 

Note. — The former in honor of Secretary of Navy, the latter in 
honor of Secretary of State. 

The whole of Stevens' (Second) Brigade was on the 16th as- 
signed to duty with the Engineers, in constructing the out-works and 
trenches, and the brigade was relieved from all other duty. 



Xov. '61.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 75 

The Fingal again. What a cargo she must have had ! Gov. 
Pickeus of South Carolina said the Fivfjal had cannon powder, and 
asked for 30,000 pounds of it. 

Gen. Sherman made another report to Washington, and we 
make extracts from it. He said that, in consequence of the ditli- 
culty and great amount of labor in landing our stores, some delay 
must occur in continuing operations. That it was as distasteful to 
him as to the authorities at Washington. In the meantime he con- 
sidered it necessary to intrench, etc., and when completed would 
send plans. That in continuing operations two plans suggested 
themselves. First, to hold Hilton Head and Phillips Island with a 
strong force, and proceed with a sufficient force and navj^ and open 
another important harbor. This would be carrying out " the original 
and actual object of the expedition, and for which object only our 
means have been provided," said he. Second, to occupy the points 
first mentioned, as well as Beaufort, as a base of operations, and act 
thence on a line of operations embracing Port Royal Island and the 
road to Pocotaligo, the nearest point on the Savannah & Charleston 
Railroad, into the southern counties of the State, threatening Savan- 
nah, etc., or to operate from the base of Hilton Head through the 
interior creeks and channels leading into the Savannah River below 
Savannah and near Fort Jackson, thus laying siege to Savannah and 
cutting off Fort Pulaski. These last would require more land 
transportation than he then had, and the latter an outfit of boats 
with which he was insufficiently supplied. The former would re- 
quire a small cavalry force. In conclusion he said the original plan 
was apparently the only one open. 

The resignation of Capt. O. Luduc was accepted on the loth, by 
Gen. Sherman's General Order 31. [This to show how early (soon) 
Gen. Sherman was called upon to part with his officers.] 

Lieut. -Col. Bell of the Fourth New Hampshire was appointed 
Inspector-General on the 15th, by Gen. Sherman; and Col. Brown 
of the Third Rhode Island was placed in command of the Military 
Depot at Fort Welles. 

A large detail on the 15th from our regiment (66 each from D, 
E and G), digging ditches and building breastworks all day; and it 
is recorded that whiskey juice was passed around for the boys to 
smell of. The drafts upon the men for work of various kinds was 
telling upon them at this time, and many of us were " used up." 

In addition to the large detail for fortification work of that day, 
there was a call for 600 men to build a wharf. 

On the 16th Gen, Lee assigned Com. Ingraham, C. S. Navy, to 
the command of the forts in Charleston Harbor ; to superintend the 
preparation and armament of the batteries for defence of Charles- • 
ton, and assign naval officers to batteries ; and to receive further 
orders from Flag Officer Tatnall. 

The same day Col. Fellows was directed by Lieut. -Col. Bell, 
Inspector-General, to send to him the names of any intemperate or 
inefficient officers. The purpose of this was to order such before a 
Board convened to rid the Department of objectionable officers. As 



76 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xor. '61. 

the Third New Hampshire had no material coming within the re- 
quirements of Col. Bell's letter, Col. Fellows had no reply to make, 
of course. 

Gen. Sherman, on the 16th, appointed Lieut. Keenan, U. S. 
Volunteers, Chief Signal Otlicer of the Department. We got another 
mail the same da}'. 

Gen. Sherman reported again to Washington, in substance as 
follows : He said that the position of his forces necessitated the 
most active operations during the coming winter, the climate render- 
ing it impracticable after April next. We have now, he said, the 
valuable harbors of Port Royal and St. Helena, and he predicted 
one other shortly. He recommended a fort on Hunter's [Hunting] 
Island, to secure the important roadstead of St. Helena. After se- 
curing these points, he said, and establishing a flne base for inland 
operations, he would not have many men left for such operations. 
Recommended an additional force of 10,000 men, some regulars 
among them, also artillery. The volunteer force was not, he said, 
adapted to artillery. We shall require three or four steamers, 
not over 9 feet draught, capable of taking 800 or 1,000 men, 
for operation in the rivers and creeks ; and two ferry boats, drawing 
5 to 6 feet. Also, about 100 row boats, capable of carrying 40 to 
50 men each, with kedges and oars. A few of them should be large 
enough to transport' pieces of artillery and siege guns. He asked to 
have the lightships off Port Royal replaced, and the lighthouse ou 
Hunting Island be re-lighted. He wanted more engineer officers, 
and three ordnance sergeants, the two he now had being at Fort 
Welles and Fort Seward. 

Co. D came in the 16th from picket at and near Drayton's 
Plantation. The men were laden with sweet potatoes and other 
necessaries. They reported a negro prayer meeting on the previous 
night at Drayton's, in which Capt. Dunbar and others took part. 
This was the first of the kind since we landed, and the boys appre- 
ciated it. 

Gen. Lee sent Gen. Trapier the 16th from Charleston to Fernau- 
diua, and Gen. Ripley was assigned to Charleston. 

On the 16th, as if in preparation for another expedition, the 
following troops were ordered to embark, though the order did not 
reach camp till the 17th : — 

Third New Hampshire, G companies, Steamer Daniel Webster. 
4 companies, " Marian. 

Forty-seventh New York " Star of the South. 

Forty-eii>hth New York " Cahaa-ha. 

Eighth Maine " Ariel. 

Volnnteer Engineers, 2 companies, . " Oriental. 

Third Rhode Island •' Ilatansas. 

A very singular occurrence on the 16th. In burning off the 
wood from the east side of the island, to make room for our line of 
fortifications, four rebel soldiers were smoked out, who had secreted 
themselves since the 7th, and had' meanwhile eaten sweet potatoes 
to keep their sweet lives — and it is said they ate them raw. They 
were taken immediately to the Provost Marshal, and did n't appear 
to be very unhappy at their discovery and relief. 



Xov. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 77 

HILTON HEAD. 

A private letter of 18th Nov. says : — 

I was surprised to see the amount of property that had been brought 
ashore from the fleet in boats, and for the want of wharves had been thrown 
overl)oard from the boats on the beach, and Laid in one indiscriminate 
mass all along the shore for a mile. Army wagons (in pieces), heavy siege 
guns, cannon "balls, timber and lumber (tied into rafts and fastened to the 
shore with ropes), boxes and a host of other stuff. The tide was liigh and 
nearly covered everything that did not float. 

On the 18th of November the order to embark was received; 
niid of course we had no knowledge of proposed destination. Possi- 
bly we were to go to Charleston ; and if so, we should not get off so 
easily as to fighting as on 7th inst. 

Gov. Milton of Florida was in trouble again. He comphiined 
to Jeff. Davis that no one appeared to be in command in Florida, in 
a military line, and asked for a competent man — say Col. Richard 
F. Floyd — to be appointed at once, or he him- 
self authorized, in which latter case he would 
himself take charge and defend the State from 
invasions. He asked for 1,000 each of En- 
field sabres and pistols, and a few hundred 
bags of buckshot. Said the State's gallant 
sons and daughters would rather perish 
bravely, sword in hand, vindicating their 
rights, than yield submissively to or entertain 
a moment's thought of living under the same 
government with the people of the North. negro hut. 

What a state of things ! 

The same day our Chaplain, with an assistant, struggled with a 
heap of parcels, mostly money, being sent home by the men, by ex- 
press. 'Twas the first opportunity since landing ; and the packages 
Avere numerous, and slightly enhanced by the proposal to embark, 
we knew not what for or where going. 

We were having at that time the usual drills, dress parades and 
fatigue details. 

As a reminder of the great storm. Gen. Sherman dismissed, on 
the 20th, " from all military connection with the expedition," Chief 
Engineer Hibbard Sabin, Third Asst. Engineer T. G. Smith, and 
Carpenter W. H. Oderall, all of the Win field Scott, for deserting 
the vessel, with five feet of water in the hold and five companies 
of Fiftieth Pennsylvania on board. 

There had been so much mutinous conduct on board transports 
in the harbor, that Gen. Sherman the same day directed the Chief 
Quartermaster to procure a quantity of " cuffs, and ball and chain." 
He evidently meant to have order. 

On the same day, also, there were only seven companies at 
parade, the other three being on fatigue duty. 

We had a general inspection the same day, with knapsacks on, 
by Lieut.-Col. Bell (Fourth New Hampshire), Inspector-General. 
In his report of it he said: "The regiment is in good condition of 




7,S THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Nov. 'Gl. 

police, drill aud appearance .... the Quartermaster has on hand 
thirteen horses and five wagons .... one hospital stores A^agon, 
one 2-horse ambulance, one 1 -horse ambulance, with horses for 
same. Hospital admirably managed. Hospital fund, $80.01, with 
053 rations due. Only three men have been tried by general court- 
martial since organization .... to complete the equipment of the 
regiment requires 936 pairs pants, 93(3 pairs socks . . . . 179 
forage caps . . . . " That showed that at that early date our Con- 
cord (grey) pants had worn out, or that it was extremely desirable 
that we change to blue^ — perhaps both reasons existed. An ex- 
traordinary mail (also express) was sent North the same day by our 
Chaplain. 1,800 letters ! 

Our hearts were gladdened on the 20th by the arrival of the Bel- 
videre, which we had mourned as lost in the storm with all on board. 
As the Third New Hampshire had about twenty on board, and the 
Belvidere had a peculiarly trying experience, it is given separately. 

On the 20th, also. Gen. Sherman, in furtherance of the con- 
templated movement, ordered the following officers, with their De- 
partments, to embark, viz. : Capt. Fuller, Assistant Quartermaster; 
Capt. Scull, Commissai-y Subsistence ; Lieut. Porter, Ordnance De- 
partment ; Lieut. Tardy, Corps of Engineers. 

Only 12 men sick in our hospital on the 21st, two of them dan- 
gerously so. Corp. Zeri Sager of Co. F died 21st. Seven coinpa- 
nies at work at beach 21st, aud only three companies on dress 
parade ; and Capt. Dunbar was Officer of the Day. 

An order was issued the 21st from an unusual source. Our 
Surgeon (Dr. Moalton) with duty^ and the good of the men only in 
mind, issued an order, duly numbered, etc., and having in it all the 
solemnity and dignity requisite for the desired effect, requiring that 
every man should bathe twice a week, that each tent be swept daily, 
and the sides raised for two hours. This was duly approved- by Col. 
Fellows and promulgated. 

On the 21st, also. Gen. Sherman, having a desire to know all 
that was going on about him, directed that all orders to outlying de- 
tachments be sent througli his Headquarters. 

Gen. Lee decided, the 21st, that the only points to be defended 
were the entrance to Cumberland Sound and Brunswick, and the 
water approaches to Savannah and Charleston. Said he had put 
several naval officers on land duty as ordnance aud artillery officers. 

On the 22d the men who had returned to us from (on) the 
Belvidere, returned to it as it lay in the harbor (horses, etc., not yet 
landed), expecting to start with proposed new expedition. 

Target practice was ordered by Gen. Sherman on the 23d, 
"but at present only for the guards, on being relieved." The 23cl 
was one of the windiest since our arrival here. 

Co. D was detailed on fatigue on the 25th ; and we find the men 
were beginning to bank up their tents, for obvious reasons. This 
was forbidden later. 

As a sort of supplement to the incidents of the 7th inst., we 
were startled and shocked on the 25th by the information that in 



JVor. '61.'\ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 79 

cleaning up the fort (Walker, now Welles) thirteen dead l)odies of 
soldiers were found, having been buried with their equipments, etc. 

As proofs of the pressing needs of the service in the matter of 
labor: while we were on dress parade, Co. E was ordered, 25th, to 
leave the line and go to the beach to work ; and their dinners were 
carried down to them. A diary of that day said, "Co. E worked 
on the dock;" and it would appear that the new wharf had been at 
least begun. Our Chaplain took a ride over the island, the 25th, 
with Mr. Lane, and said, after it: "I saw slaverj' today in its full 
aspect, and am wiser tonight than this morning." 

Lieut. -Col. Wilson, Ordnance Officer, reported to Gen. Sher- 
man on the 25th. 

Gen. Sherman, under date of 25 Nov. 1861, reported he had 
found stowed away on Ladies Island two lighthouse apparatus, in- 
cluding lamps and reflectors, and a large quantity of oil, and had 
turned the same over to Com. DuPont, as the better custodian, 
Com. DuPont already having one, found by him at Beaufort. He 
(Gen. Sherman) also said he found Tybee Island and its forts de- 
serted, and Com. DuPont had on the day previous sent some gun- 
boats down there. In another report of same date (21st) Gen. 
Sherman said his scouts had recently found a deserted work on 
Ladies Island, and spiked the guns, which would be brought in later. 
The scouts had discovered the enemy to have an outpost at Port 
Royal Ferry, and their main force to be at Pocotaligo. 

On the same date Lieut. Wilson of the Engineers reported to 
Gen. Sherman that he had made an examination of the ferries lead- 
ing from Hilton Head Island at two points — Ferry Point and Span- 
ish Wells. Distance from Ferry Point to the White House opposite 
was 1.54 miles or 2,714 yards. He further stated that negroes said 
the ferry was only used at high tide, and men, horses, carriages, 
etc., could be crossed in scows. Spanish Wells was opposite IMay 
River and had a good landing, with deep water at 50 yards from the 
shore. 

Com. DuPont reported the same daj' to the Navy Department 
that Tybee Island was in our possession, having been abandoned 
(no date named). Said the Flacj^ Axfjiista and the Pocahontas were 
at anchor abreast Tj'bee beacon, and the Savannah (another gun- 
boat) was to be sent there too. 

The first mention of fresh beef was on the 26th, when Co. D 
sent a detail to butcher for the Commissary Department, resulting in 
fresh meat dinners. We got our first frost that night. The boys 
began to bank up none to soon. 

The rebel ordnance officer. Gill, at Savannah, reported to Gen. 
Lee, the 27th, the condition and armament of each of the forts on 
or below the Savannah, and reconunends for the shot guns of his 
men a blank cartridge, with linen bag containing twelve buck shot. 
Just think of it I A round dozen at each discharge I 

We got a mail the 27th. In the matter of mails, the writer will 
here state that a "mail" will invariably mean a mail received; and 
as each such was an event of no small importance to us, they will be 



80 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. INor. '61. 

mentioned frequently, but without using (wasting) space. If the 
word "mail" occurs standing alone by itself, it will be sufficient. 

On the 27th, too, another rebel reference. The rebel Lieut. - 
Col. C'olcock, mounted regiment at Camp Marion (probably not far 
from Bluffton) , sent word to Gen. Drayton that he had sent a detail 
of about 45 men to Bulls Island, and they had captured 38 negroes, 
belonging mostly to Joseph Baynard, who had tried to join the 
Yanks. He fui'ther said : "I neglected to inform yon that Baynard's 
fellow (Pompey) had to be killed to prevent his escape." This 
little missive was endorsed by Gen. Drayton and sent to Gen. Lee, 
thus: "Gen. Drayton takes great pleasure in forwarding the en- 
closed to Gen. Lee, and trusts the next one may result in the cap- 
ture of some of the Liucolnites." 

Capt. (then Lieutenant) Ayer, after reaching Bay Point, the 
27th, said that he saw an earthwork up the beach, say a mile and 
a half from Bay Point, with six pieces of light artillery mounted. 
They had been spiked with three-cornered files. [This was usually 
done with rat-tail files. — D. E.] One piece was left loaded to the 
muzzle with grape. At Bay Point he saw a piece literally split 
through, its centre by an explosion. 

The same day a diary said, "Helped fix up a place for reli- 
gious meetings." 

Adjt.-Gen. Thomas (Washington, D. C.) instructed Sherman, 
under date of 27 Nov. 1861, to seize all cotton and other property 
which might be used to our prejudice. That part not wanted to be 
shipped to New York. The service of negroes to be used in pick- 
ing, storing, etc., as well as in constructing defensive works. Four 
additional regiments have been ordered to join your command. 

Under same date (27) Gen. Sherman reported that owing to 
the want of an engineer officer (one sick, one on reconnoissance and 
one already employed at Hilton Head), he had himself been to Tybee 
and made reconnoissance that day, with view to reduction of Fort 
Pulaski, and finds it practicable. He asked for ten regiments of 
infantry, not over one of cavalry, and one regiment of regular 
artillery, several ordnance, artillery and engineer officers, and a 
pontoon bridge. 

The last Thursday in November arrived — the time when we 
were wont, at our peaceful homes, to lay aside the cares and duties 
of every-day life and give ourselves up to pleasure, relaxation or 
religious service, or perhaps a little of each. In accordance with 
the custom, Col. Fellows endeavored to cater to our wishes, and 
issued a Thanksgiving proclamation : and in it excused us from all 
unnecessary drill. He also very kindly invited the officers of the 
regiment to dine with him. The records fail to disclose the name 
of any absent officer who could not avail himself of the invitation, 
neither does the record disclose the bill of fare. They probably had 
" beef-a-la-reb " and " seceshers on toast." The table was graced 
by the presence of the wife of Dr. (Surgeon) Eastman of the 
Fourth New Hampshire. 



4. 


Lovewell. 


5. 


Alwood. 


6. 


Mason. 


7. 


Gardner. 


8. 


Dennis <{■ Bichardson. 


9. 


Mrs. Mary Politza. 


10. 


Higgtns. 


11. 


Wakejteld No. 12. 


12. 


Doufflasa No. 11. 


13. 


Dunbar No. 10. 


U. 


Lav-rence No. 0. 


15. 


Bullard No. fi. 


Nnt Taylor No. 7. 




O'NeiJ No. Oi. 




Cahill No. G. 


16. 


Beard No. 5. 


17. 


Dennis No. 4. 


18. 


Morgan & Marsh No. 3. 


19. 


Guard. 


20. 


Forage House. 


21. 


Laborers' Quarters. 



i. Blacksmitli. 

'. Carpenter. 

'. Stables. 

'. Post Quartermaster's Stores. 

■ Chief Quartermaster. 

■ Wagon House. 
. Ice House. 

. Adams Express. 

■ Post Office. 
Printing Office. 
Hotel. ' 

Quartermaster's Depot. 
Officers' Quarters. 
Chief Commissary. 
District Headquarters. 
Medical Purveyor. 
Ordnance Department. 
Bakery. 

Commissary Stores, 
Barracks. 

Theatre. 

Church. 
Stotter. 
Pier 1277 ft. long, 22 ft. low sealer. 



SCiXt 
I 300 , 3oo . 

jeet 






HEAD.S.C. 








G«^^ 



Nov. '61. 2 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 81 

After dress parade (in the morning at that time, though the 
usual time for parade was late in the afternoon) the Colonel gave 
us the day to ourselves, and we gave ourselves up to perfect relaxa- 
tion. The day's serenity was marred only by the sad funeral of 
Private Sanborn of Co. I. A large number of the Fourth New 
Hampshire men came 
over in the evening. _ as5*-,,^__ 

Though we were ^fc' — 
ordered on the 17th to ^^-^^ 



£ 



embark (promulgated ^ yf ^^ t' % \ 

the 18th), we did not K^| ,' [^* J ^ ) 



embark till the 29th, 

and then only to return 

at once on shore and to 

learn later that we had pope's, hilton head. 

embarked for practice, 

just to see how quickly we could do it in case of emergency ! This 

may be, and probably is all right ; but as individuals we didn't like it. 

Gen. Lee reported, the 19th, the occupation of Tybee Island. 
He said : "On Sunday last, 24th instant, the enemy crossed Savan- 
nah bar with five of his vessels, and made a lodgement on Tybee. 
Subsequently three other vessels joined them, and the force on 
Tybee was reinforced. Five vessels (one a frigate, said to be the 
Sabine) were then inside the bar." 

Gen. Sherman on the 30th made a reconnoissance on Tybee 
Island, having as escort three companies of the Fourth New 
Hampshire under Maj. Drew. 

Corporal Joseph A. Peavey of Co. G was buried the 30th. 

November was a month of great interest. Ushered in by a 
terrible storm, and the last act a military funeral. 



SUPPLEMIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

A War Department order of 13th authorized the issue of 
" Fielden's Pure Extract of Coffee" in place of sugar and coffee 
rations, and also provided that insane soldiers shall receive free 
treatment at the Insane Hospital at Washington. 

To show the difficulties that the authorities at Washington were 
under, particularly during the earlier part of the war, in discerning 
how everything should be done, the following is given as a fair 
illustration : On the 2.5th of November an order provided that all 
missing in action or taken prisoners thereafter, or then prisoners, 
should be transferred to skeleton regiments then forming, in their 
respective States, to be formed entirely of such missing officers and 



82 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Xov. '61. 



men. This was an attempt to clean up the rolls of regiments in 
the field, so that they would not be prevented from recruiting : 
because so long as these missing persons were borne on the rolls, 
their places could not be filled. This order was revoked entire on 
20 Feb. 18G2. This revocation did not accomplish the result 
intended, inasmuch as there had been some cases of compliance 
with the November order; and on 10 May 1862, to correct all 
the action under the original order, another order was issued, 
directing the re-transfer to their original regiments of all such as 
had been transferred under the November order. This straightened 
out the whole matter. The powers that were, had and should have 
our warmest sympathy. 

The important statistics for the month, for the whole Depart- 
ment (not yet called Department of the South) are : Total troops 
13,225 ; wounded and sick, 4,481 ; died, 56 ; hospital cases of 
wounds, etc., 118; died of wounds, etc., 2. 



The Monthly Return shows : - 
Field and Staff 


. — m 


Co. A 


. 98 
. 97 


B 


c . 


. 95 
. 93 ' 
. 95 
. 92 

. 8G ' 
. 93 ' 

. 88 
. 89 ' 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 



Present aggregate . . 
Aggregate last report . 
Loss : 5 died of disease. 



officers. 



994 
999 



We have now entered upon an era when men, and officers too, 
will be detached from the regiment for duty elsewhere. The neces- 
sities of service required this. This report shows one from A 
and four from F so detached. None of the officers are absent, and 
but one (Co. F) reported sick. 



Sergeants . . 
Corporals . . 
Recruits required 
Absent sick . . 



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(84) 



DKCEMBER, 1861. 




T WAS SUNDAY, the 1st of December, and we had our 
usual inspection and dress parade. Mail. Adjt. Hill 
was on sick list that day, and Lieut. Emmons of G 
acted as adjutant (and for several days following). 

Capt. Gilhiiore reported, the 1st, to Gen. Sherman 
the result of an examination of Tybee Island. Said he 
went to Tybee on the Ben Deford 29 Nov. 1861, with 
escort of three companies Seventh New Hampshire, under 
Maj. Drew, landing next day. He fully described the 
island, and also the tower and field-work surrounding it. Said he 
deemed the reduction of Fort Pulaski from Tybee practicable, by 
mortars and rifled gun batteries. Said he thought, after range had 
been established, could drop five-eighths of all shells fired within the 
fort. Said he learned there were 700 men in Fort Pulaski, 200 of 
whom went there 30 Nov. He suggested the occupation of Tybee 
by one full regiment at once and until plans were determined. 

Another sad reminder that day of the fight of 7th ult. Five 
rebel officers came with a flag of truce, requesting the body of Dr. 
Buist, left accidentally buried in the fort. After the proper formali- 
ties, the body was disinterred and surrendered to them, together 
with his watch, etc., which had been removed previous to second 
burial. 

There were seven companies detailed on duty away from the 
regiment on the 2d ; and at night, for variety, we had the long roll 
call. A large number of men were butchering that day, and that 
looked like fresh beef for the troops. The cotton question was a 
serious one, not only for Gen. Sherman, but for the Government as 
well. Just what to do with King Cotton when captured, whether in 
one bale or one bag, disturbed many a loyal breast. 

On the 3d Dec, Gen. Sherman undertook to dispose of the 
matter, by appointing Wm. H. Nobles an agent of the United States 
to collect cotton, and authorized him to employ negroes to collect, 
pick and pack it, and to be allowed six per cent on the market value 
of the cotton stored. 

Deeming what Gen. Sherman reported to Washington to be im- 
portant, we extract from his report of the 4th Dec. : He reported in 
substance that Tybee Island had been examined, and enclosed Capt. 
Gillmore's report of it. Said Gillmore and himself agreed as to the 
feasibility of shelling Fort Pulaski from Tybee Island, and thus de- 
molish it or make it untenable. Said he was about to send a regi- 
ment there to occupy it. He enclosed a list of heavy guns, etc., 



86 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Dec. '61. 

that he would need to operate against Pulaski, and suggested the 
dearth of experienced officers to direct, and that possibly some other 
movement might be carried on simultaneously with that against 
Pulaski. 

Capt. Randlett, with his company (F), went to Pinckney Island 
the 4th, for forage. 

We were working very hard al)out that time. There were 350 
men detailed on the 5th to work in the Quartermaster's Department. 
The camp was very quiet and almost lonely, all being detailed except 
two companies (I and E) ; and, in consequence, no dress parade. 

Again, on the 6th, there was a heavy draft on us for men, 400 
being detailed for work with the Engineers to wheel dirt ; and Co. D 
was sent to Seabrook for a week's tour on duty at Battery Mitchel 
(then in process of building) . 

The Germans (Forty-sixth New York) left here (Hilton Head) 
for Tybee Island the 6th. (The Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania afterwards 
took its place in our brigade.) Stevens' brigade also went away. 
Capt. Clark, with his company (A) and the colors, escorted the 
Fifty-fifth a part of the way to the wharf. 

King Cotton was apparently a large dose for Mr. Nobles (see 3d 
inst.), and he appointed, the 6th, one James Adrian Suydam as his 
assistant. Perhaps he could n't handle so many negroes, to say 
nothing about the bags of cotton. 

Another large detail on the 7th, for Quartermaster's Depart- 
ment, of 350 men, and no dress parade. 

A letter of the 8th said : " The Forty-sixth New York has gone 
to Tybee to erect a battery, just out of reach of Pulaski's guns, and 
mount long range guns to take the fort. Our Colonel has got a 
milch cow (captured) and I talk of getting a hennery and a pig- 
gery." Need it be said that the above was from the pen of Capt. 
Ayer ? 

On the 8th we had our usual Sunday inspection and dress pa- 
rade ; and to show how seldom some things occurred, a diary men- 
tions " a woman on the field." The sight of calico was n't an every- 
day afi'air. 

Reinforcements for Gen. Sherman arrived on the 9th — seven 
companies Forty-fifth Pennsylvania, from Fort Monroe, on the Cos- 
mo]3olitan . 

Hazeltine, a drummer boy of Co. G (originally in Co. K) was 
buried on the 9th. He died the 8th, after a sickness of ten days, 
during which time he knew nothing whatever. 

[Note. — This boy and the writer were of ca squad of seven, enlisted 
at West Lebanon, N. H. The writer and the other five felt an unusual tie 
of friendship in this case, and a long correspondence with the parents at 
home resulted in the taking up of the body and sending it home in a 
metallic casket, sent out for the purpose. The writer assisted largely in 
every detail, with all that that implies.] 

Gen. Lee divided the coasts of South Carolina into five military 
districts on the 9th :".... The Second from South Santee River 
to the Stono River and up Rantowles Creek, under Brig. -Gen. R, S. 



Dec. '61.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 87 

Ripley ; headquarters at Charleston. Third, the country between 

the Stono and Ashepoo Rivers, under ; headquarters at Adams 

Run. Fourth, from the Ashepoo to Port Royal Entrance, thence 
through the Colleton River and Ocella Creek to Ferebeeville, under 
Brig. -Gen. J. C. Pemberton ; headquarters at Coosawatchee. Fifth, 
the country between Port Royal Entrance and the Savannah River, 
under Brig. -Gen. T. F. Drayton ; headquarters at Hardeeville. 
The Third will be attached to the Second for the present." 

On the 10th our regiment was further drawn upon for 700 men — 
hard to scrape enough ; and it was said that these were to be con- 
sidered as on "extra duty," entitling to extra pay and whiskey. 
The latter was really issued ; but the former, oh, where was it? Cer- 
tain accounts, reliable too, probably, said that at end of nine days 
the detail was discontinued. The rule that there must be ten con- 
secutive days' work to entitle to extra pay was not permitted to 
work. There was a generous distribution of adjectives and some 
verbs cast upon the air ; but no extra pay had we. 

Gen. Sherman reported the 10th to Gen. Meigs, Quartermaster- 
General at Washington, that the great number of deaths was alarm- 
ing ; that he had directed the erection of a hospital for 300 ; that the 
negroes had proved to be of very little service — that they came in 
and ran off; and they were a very prolific race. He further said 
that DuPont had failed to do as agreed in matter of landing the 
troops, etc., and he did not wish to cooperate any more with Du- 
Pont. 

King Cotton ran against a snag. U. S. Agent Nobles tried to 
assume command over something which is n't cotton ; and Gen. 
Stevens (at Beaufort) peremptorily told him he would not permit it, 
neither would he allow him to establish an agency at Beaufort. 

Gen. Viele, by his order of the 11th, directed the establishment 
of a brigade band, composed of all the regimental bands in the (our) 
brigade, together with the drum corps of the Forty-seventh New 
York. The leader of our regimental band, G. AV. lugalls, to be 
Leader, and the drum major of the Forty-seventh New York to be 
Drum Major. They were to assemble for drill daily at half-past 
two. That we would have music, concentrated and exhilarating, 
none could doubt, and we wjere highly flattered in the selection of 
leader. 

The whole regiment at work on the 11th, ou the intrenchments, 
in charge of Maj. Bedel. Mail. The President's message came in 
this mail, and the men, upon return to camp, had it read to them, by 
Maj. Bedel, from the top of a barrel. 

The Board (mentioned several days ago) to examine officers 
who may be considered incompetent, etc., was appointed today by 
Gen. Sherman, and consisted of : Gen. Wright, U. S. A. ; Col. 
Terry, Seventh Connecticut ; Col. Brown, Third Rhode Island ; and 
Lieut. J. H. Wilson, Topographical Engineers. 

Beside a heavy detail for work on the intrenchments, on the 
12th we had a call for 300 men for the Quartermaster's Department. 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIKE REGIMENT. 



IDec. '61. 



The several Chaplains about this time were using their best en- 
deavors for the moral and religious welfare of the men ; and one of 
the results was that on the 13th Gen. Sherman appointed a council of 
administration, — Col. Fellows (Third New Hampshire), Col. Perry 
(Forty-eighth New York) and Col. Rich (Ninth Maine), to assemble 
the 14th and consider whether a Chaplain ought to be appointed for 
the Post of Hilton Head ; and if they decide affirmatively, to recom- 
mend one. 

A heavy detail again the 13th, of 500 men. 
Gen. Sherman, on the 14th, asked the authorities at Washing- 
ton to amend his request for 1 regiment cavalry, 1 regiment regular 
artillery, 10 regiments infantry and one pontoon, so as to ask for 
1 regiment cavalry, 1 regiment regular artillery, 20 regiments in- 
fantry and as many pontoon bridges as can be spared. He said 
all the work (which was immense) , was done by volunteer soldiers ; 
and it all dragged for want of a sufficient number of able directors, 

and added that 

negro labor was 
almost a failure. 
There were 
five hundred men 
detailed again the 
14th, and there 
were four men 
discharged for 
disability. 2d 
Lieut. Geo. W. 
Jackson of Co. 
E resigned the 
1.4th, and was the 
first officer to 

resign (he was discharged the 16th). An event of no small im- 
portance took place the 14th. The new bakery at the headquarters 
of the post was fired up and produced a batch of soft bread (see 
18th). A diary said: "Only 13 sick in hospital today." 

The negro question assumed a serious aspect, for on the loth 
Gen. Sherman reported to Washington that of 320 recently come in, 
60 were able-bodied and the rest were women and children. 
Wages had been paid, but of not much effect. They were naturally 
slothful and indolent, and were overjoyed with change of their con- 
dition. They would probably stay on the plantations till their 
supplies were exhausted, and then seek our lines for subsistence ; 
and said, finally, that it was for the Government to decide what to 
do with the contrabands. 

Last night there was an attempt to attack the force at Seabrook 
(some of the Seventy-ninth New York) ; and it was currently 
reported the 1.5th that the rebels were frightened away by the sight 
of a log mounted on wheels, which the Yankee officer had improvised 
as a means of defence. 




DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTERS, HILTON HEAD, S. C. 




Gkn. Eciiinti L. ViKLE. Gex. Georgk C. Strong 







Gex. Ali-red II. Terry. 



Dec. '67.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 89 

As if to rest us from our fatiguing labors, we had a brigade 
inspection on Sunday the 15th (in the afternoon) and a review, Gen. 
Viele giving us a little double-quick by way of variety, which we 
didn't appreciate. This was in addition to our dress parade of the 
morning. 

The liquor question began to assume proportions, for Gen. 
Sherman on the 16th ordered that no ardent spirits should be landed 
without authority and that no plunder (this was not his language) 
should be sent North b}' express or otherwise. The same day 
(thougli the order did not reach us for several days) Gen. 
McClellan, Commanding the Army, ordered a change in the uni- 
form. Trousers to be sky-blue mixture for officers and men, the 
officers to have dark-blue welts, and non-coms, to have dark-blue 
chevrons. He also directed that there should be no further trans- 
fers from one regiment to another. 

Gen. Lee reported, the 16th, to his War Department that 
there were 80 vessels of the eneiuy at Port Royal on the 12th. 

We had a detail of 300 the 16th, and to be 500 on the 17th. 
It appears prior to the 17th that orderl}' sergeants had been calling 
the roll ahead of Army Regulation time; and on the 17th Col. 
Fellows ordered that thereafter the roll should not be called until 
after the last ruffle of the drum. 

For picket, 72 on the 17th. 

Soft bread was issued to us on the 18th for the first time, and 
we had it for supper. That was an event. A soldier with a loaf 
of bread ! Soft, too, but twenty-four hours old, as required by the 
Army Regulations. 

On the 19th, 2d Lieut. W. H. Miles of Co. K resigned, but 
was not discharged till 6 Feb. 1862. 

The stone fleet, of so much fame, was sunk off Charleston on 
the 20th. 



THE STONE FLEET. 

This remarkable fleet was sunk off Charleston, Friday, 20 Dec. 
1861. The following is the list: Amazon, America, American, 
Archer, Courier, Fortune, Herald, Kensington, Leonidas, Maria 
Theresa, Potomac, Rehecca Simms, L. O. Richmond, Robin Hood, 
Tenedos and Willi a in Lee. These were all "New Bedford whalers," 
except the Fortune, Robin Hood and Tenedos, which were from New 
London. The tonnage of these vessels varied from 275 to 500 tons. 
They were loaded with large blocks of granite. Their cost was 
from S2,500 to $5,000 each. The rendezvous was at Port Royal, 
from which place they started for their burial places under naval 
convoy, consisting of the Mohican, Ottcuca, Pocohontas ; and these 
assisted by the CahoAcba, Philadelphia and Ericsson. The sinking 
was under charge of Capt. Chas. H. Davis of the Coast Survey, 
and the knocking out of a plug, previously adjusted, completed 
the act. The Robin Hood served as a store-ship for the sails, etc., 



90 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Dec. '61. 

of the others, and was the last to be sunk. She remained upright, 
and at dark was set on fire, tlie effect being tragic in the extreme. 
Sumter fired durino; the sinking, but did not retard the movement. 



Again King Cotton. Under date of 20th, Capt. Saxton re- 
ported to the Quartermaster-General that he had consigned to Col. 
Tompkins (Quartermaster at New York), by Steamer Atlantic, 
$30,000 worth of cotton ; that the agent of the Government had 
just arrived on the Vanderbilt, and would have little else to do 
than take the credit for collecting about two million dollars' worth 
of cotton ; and closed by urging Gen. Meigs to come to Port 
Royal — only 70 hours from New York. 

Only 600 detailed on the 21st. Same day. Gen. Sherman 
announced in an order that Lieut. -Col. Reynolds of the Third Rhode 
Island had been appointed Government Agent for the collection 
and marketing of cotton. Also, on the 21st, Gen. Sherman wrote 
to Secretary of War that the newspapers of the country appeared 
in some degree dissatisfied that we have not moved ahead ; and it 
may be, he continued, that the Government shares in the feeling. 
He further said he was ready to move on Fernandina ; but the navy 
was not ready ; that he was pained to believe that there was a grow- 
ing distrust among a portion of the people as to the activity and 
usefulness of the portion of the army at Port Royal. 

Though it was Sunday, and we were working very hard on 
other days, on the 22d we had dress parade and also brigade review 
and inspection, and in addition a brigade drill. This was the first 
time since landing that we had been deprived of Sunday services on 
account of drill. 

Gen. Sherman reported again that DuPont had just informed 
him that the gunboats Paivnee and Seneca had discovered the aban- 
donment of the rebel forts at North and South Edisto, and that a 
camp of 500 had fled at the gunboats' approach, leaving everything 
except their guns, and advised the occupation of Edisto for effect 
on Charleston. 

On the 23d we had an excessively long battalion drill. Four 
men were detailed as bakers to work at the new post bakery. 

Christmas was approaching ; but how would it fare with us ? 
The President signed a bill the 24th, authorizing allotments of pay 
(see allotments). 

Gen. Lee, the 24th, complained that so many 12-months men 
would be ready for muster-out in the spring, while the troops of 
McClellan would be strong for active service. He said further: 
" Our enemy increases faster in strength then we do, and is more 
enormous. Where he will strike I do not know ; but the blow, 
when it does come, will be hard." 

Christmas day, 25 Dec. 1861. We had dress parade and a 
long battalion drill. After dress parade the Chaplain, by request of 
the Colonel (as he said in his diary), gave an address on various 
points. He also said he got a load of bricks that day, and the boys 
built him a fine fui'nace. 



Dec. '61.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 91 

CHRISTMAS, 1861. 

The night before, Co. — was detailed for picket duty. Cir- 
cumstances requiring no explanation rendered one and all — 
regardless of rank — good fellows. And this too before the men 
were posted. The empty bottles lying about, seen at daylight, 
were only circumstantial evidence, and therefore not reliable as a 
basis of assumption that somebody had drank toasts to Christmas. 
During the uight the otiicers, entering into the sport of the occasion, 
amused themselves and others by passing themselves off as the 
" Grand Rounds," which travels mounted. As they approached a 
post, they would stamp and jingle their sword scabbards to imitate 
mounted officers. Much fun was the result when the faithful senti- 
nel directed that one dismount and approach with the countersign. 



We had a black frost the 25th, and the 26th a white frost. On 
the 26th Gen. Sherman reported to McClellan that he had been 
unable to get DuPont to investigate with him the problem of 
Charleston, also that he had conferred with Capt. Gilmore. Said 
two modes of operation suggested themselves : First, to take Sullivan 
and Morris Islands, and reduce Sumter from these two points ; then 
the navy pass in and shell the city, with possibly the assistance of 
the army via Mount Pleasant. Second, by Stono Inlet and Stono 
River, getting possession of James Island and shelling Charleston 
from upper end. Said he would require 20,000 infantry, 1,000 
cavalry, 2 light batteries, 30 siege guns and some 8 and 10-pounder 
mortars. 

On the same day. Secretary of War Cameron wrote to Gen. 
Sherman : — 

You are correct in your belief tliat there is a growing distrust, etc. I 
do not share in tliat distrust ; for my confidence in your ability is very great 
.... You refer to a want of cavalry. This is the first intimation I have 
had that any were needed by you. Let me know the number required, and 
they shall be sent at once, as well as any other force that you deem neces- 
sary. At this distance .... this Department will not attempt to give you 
specific instructions. You will have to rely upon your own judgment, in 
which I have every confidence. 

These must have been very cheering words to Gen. Sherman ; 
for he undoubtedly had a tinge of the blues — so much expected 
of him, and he (his force) too weak to accomplish it. 

Here are rebel items of the 26th : The Colonel of the Seventeenth 
South Carolina reported to Gen. Ripley that he had 547 officers and 
men; that he also had 75 good muskets, and 415 flint locks utterly 
unfit for service ; and no transportation. The Colonel of the Six- 
teenth South Carolina also reported to Gen. Ripley that he had n't a 
single bayonet, belt, scabbard or cartridge box in his regiment, and 
one company was entirely unarmed ; and he had about three rounds 
of cartridges and caps. It would seem that the foe over on the 
mainland was not such a formidable foe as pictured. 

We had a general review and inspection by Gen. Sherman on 
the 27th, and as a regiment got the highest compliment. Mail. On 
that day Gen. Sherman wrote to McClellan : — 



92 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IDec. '61. 

The Ocean Queen arrived yesterday with a mail, but no news of cavalry 
for me .... It is absolutely necessary to do something here soon .... we 
are badly in want of boats .... these fellows (rebels) are getting stronger 
every day. 

At 8 that evening a detail of 150 men went to the beach. 

On the 28th we had battalion drill. Fifty men went on detail, 
with three days' rations, to Braddock's Point. It was rumored that 
a detail was to be sent North on recruiting service, and that Capt. 
Clark of Co. A was the lucky man to go in charge. 

On Sunday, the 29th, we had another brigade review and drill. 
We were very much dissatisfied with that Sunday review and drill ; 
but soldiers have no right to complain. The exigencies of the service 
demand the work through the week ; and of course our discipline, 
etc., must be kept up, or we would soon cease to be "militious." 
That was the argument ; and to it there could be no reply. 

'Twas time somebody was going North for recruits. Who would 
it be? The order was issued on the 30th, and said that in compliance 
with par. 3 of General Orders 105, Headquarters of Army, etc., 
" The following will proceed, etc., for six months, to 30 June 1862, 
reporting to Col. Seth Eastman at Concord, N.H. : Capt. R. F. 
Clark, Co. A ; 2d Lieut. Orrin M. Dearborn, Co. D ; Sergt. F. L. 
Morrill, Co. A ; Sergt. J. W. Akerman, Co. D ; N. W. Gove, second 
principal musician ; Corp. J. W. Goodwin, Co. A." 

Who didn't envy those men, each and all. Happy men ! Lucky 
dogs ! Six months at home ! 

That same day the rebel ordnance officer at Brunswick, Ga., 
reported to his superior at Savannah, saying it was his belief the 
batteries could whip off the fleet at first attack ; but if they (the 
fleet) returned next day, the powder would be exhausted. Said his 
officers and men were both anxious to redeem the Port Royal dis- 
grace. He closed by asking for 20 bbls. large grain, and 30 bbls. 
fine grain, cannon powder. 

On the 30th, also, Col. Fellows ordered that thereafter rations 
be drawn for seven days at a time — 1st, 8th, 15th and 22d (to last 
of month) . 

Tuesday, the 31st, was muster day. By muster was meant that 
the pay-roll previously made out should be verified by an officer duly 
appointed, who should see and check off every man's name on the 
pay-roll. Sometimes this was done by the colonel of a regiment, 
though the order was generally issued by the brigade commander 
or commander of the post. In this case we were mustered by Sur- 
geon Dalton of Gen. Viele's staff. One diary said : " Our field and 
staff officers were mustered by Maj. Bedel;" but if he did, it must 
have been as an assistant to Dr. Dalton. An inspection invariably 
accompanies a muster, and it was not omitted on this occasion. 

It being the last day of the year, it must be made an interesting 
one. It started in with an eclipse of the sun, and was well-nigh 
ended when our new trousers came to hand. After muster and 
inspection, the Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth New York went up 



Dec. '61.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



93 



the river toward Beaufort, having with them our Maj. Bedel, they 
being short of field ofHcers. (This was on a recounoissance toward 
Port Royal Ferry.) 

Gen. Sherman, the same day, directed that the troops keep on 
hand 100 rounds per man, 40 in the cartridge boxes and 60 with the 
company or regiment commander. This looked like business. 

Gov. Pickens of South Carolina said to Gen. Lee, the 30th, that 
there was considerable unpleasantness amongst the otBcers under 
Gen. Ripley. Impossible ! 

Before dismissing December, we will state that the rebel troops 
in the Department of Middle and East Florida were as follows : — 

Brig.-Gen. J. H. Trapier, Commanding. 

Aggregate present 3,972 

" " and absent 4,527 




GEN. DRAYTON'S, HILTON HEAD. 



94 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



\_Dec. '61. 



SUPPLENIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 105, from the War Department, 3 Dec. 1861, 
authorized the appointment of a recruiting party from each regiment 
— 2 officers and 4 non-coms, or privates, to report in person to the 
Superintendent of Volunteer Recruiting Service for the respective 
States on 1 Jan. 1862, for a tour of six months' duty — (see Recruit- 
ing and Recruits), 

On the 16th, a War Department order made a change in the 
uniform trousers (we did n't wear " pants " in those days) : to be sky 
blue uext time, the welt for officers and stripe (chevrons) for non- 
coms, to be of dark blue. The same order forbade the transfer of 
men from one regiment to another. 



The Department statistics for December, 186 1 , are : Total troops, 
17,016 ; wounded and sick, 5,872 ; died, 66 ; hospital cases, wounds, 
etc., 220; died of wounds, etc., 3. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 



Field an 
Band 


d Staff 




• • — 


men, 


-Offl( 

3 
3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


;ers. 


Co. A 






97 




B 






97 




c 






95 




D 






93 




E 






95 




E 






92 




G 






83 




H 






93 




I 






87 




K 






86 




Present aggreg 
Aggregate last 


ate . . . 
report . . 




000 
000 



One officer reported on extra duty : and this was Lieut. 
Thompson, our efficient Commissary, who really was an officer of 
Co. I, there being no provision at that date for a commissary. 
Though Lieut. Thompson has not always been reported on extra 
duty, he had served as Commissary since organization of regiment. 

ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 

Sergeants 5555555555 00 

Corporals 8888888778 00 

Absent sick 15 

Discharged for disability 2000001011 5 

Died of disease ....00 00002001 3 

Recruits 1000000000 1 



Loss, officers , 



0000100000 











CALENDAR, 


1861. 












1 


1 


1 

H 


1 


1 

9 


1 


s^ 




•a 
§ 


>> 

1 
1 


i 


1 


f 


i 

•s 


1 


JAN... 








2 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


JULY... 




1 

8 


2 


3 
10 


4 

11 




6 
13 




6 


7 


8 


9 




7 


12 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




91 


^8 


29 


30 


31 








•'8 


'>9 


30 


31 








FEB.... 
















AUG... 










1 
8 


2 

9 


3 

10 ! 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 




4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


1' 1 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 





••••! 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


MARCH 












1 

8 


•> 














i 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


9 


SEPT. . 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




31 


















30 












APRIL. 




1 


, 




4 




6 


OCT... 




1 


9, 


3 


4 


5 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 1 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




'>S 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






MAY... 










2 


3 

10 


4 


NOV 




1 

8 


2 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


11 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 







24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


JUNE.. 














1 

8 


DEC. .. 


















2 


3 


4 


5 


(> 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


_ 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




30 














1 


29 


30 


31 





































Calkndar, 


1862. 












1 


1 ■ 

1 


1 


1 
1 


1 
3 


1 

fa 






1 




1 


1 

s 


i 


>) 

% 
g 


1 

i 


JAN.... 








\ 


2 


3 


4 


JULY... 






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JANUARY, 1862. 



m^EW YEAR'S : and as a sequel to our Major's going away 
with other troops, and the order to us to have 100 
I^IJ'^yil^ rounds, we that day heard heavy firing up the river, 
^i4^.^M., toward Beaufort ; and were ordered to hold ourselves in 
readiness to go to the scene of conflict. The affair was 
at Port Royal Ferry, and the (our) troops there were as 
follows : eight companies One Hundreth Pennsylvania (Round- 
heads), seven companies Seventy-ninth New York (Highland- 
ers), P^ighth Michigan, Fiftieth Pennsylvania, Forty-seventh and 
Forty-eighth New York. The naval force was the gunboats Ottawa^ 
Pembina and Hale^ under Capt. Rodgers. Brig.-(Teu, Stevens com- 
manded the land forces. Reliable accounts give our troops at 2,500 
and the rebel force at 3,000. The Third New Hampshire and others 
fell in about 11 a.m., and stacked arms on the color line ready to go ; 
but were not called for. 

Another event that day, of importance, was the substantial 
completion of our new church and the holding of services in it in 
the evening. 

A general court-martial was ordered on the 'id by Gen. Sherman, 
to convene on the fith, for the trial of such persons as might be 
brought before it. Detail for the court: 1, Col. Fellows, Third New 
Hampshire; .... 4, Maj. John Bedel, Third New Hampshire; 
. . . . 7, Capt. Donohoe, Third New Hampshire; .... 13, Lieut. 
Finley, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Judge Advocate. 

The recruiting service detail went North on the 2d, with many 
a ''Good luck to you!" and laden with messages and parcels for 
friends at home. 

Gen. Lee, on the 2d, wrote to Gov. Pickens of South Carolina, 
referring to a recent resolution adopted by the General Assembly 
relative to employing slaves on works for military defence. 

The Chaplain worked on the "new church" some on the 2d, 
showing that it was not then completed. 

Gen. Sherman reported on the 2d to McClellan as follows : — 

I have made a dash on enemy's batteries opposite Port Eoyal Island. 
.... I want to make no real movement in that direction, yet I want the 
enemy to think I do .... I Avant to make a great dash on the north side 
of the Savannah river, thus occupying the road to that city .... to do 
this must have regiment of cavalry .... circumstances are developing 
themselves wonderfully here .... the time has come to act .... every 
day's delay now is a sad loss .... I think Pulaski need not be shehed. I 
can cut it ort", I think. You, general, are to be the savior of the country, if 
it is saved. Let me aid you in this work. But I must act militarily, and not 
to please .... the press. 

(95) 



96 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJan. '62. 

On the 3d Gen. Sherman relieved every extra duty man in the 
Quartermaster's Department, except certain named men. (No Third 
New Hampshire man appears in the order.) 

The Forty-eighth New York returned on the 2d, and the Forty- 
seventh New York returned on the 3d — our Major with the latter. 
The Major began a speech the same day to the men, but was obliged 
to cut it in twain, delivering the balance on the 6th. 

Private R. F. Palmer of Co. P] died on the morning of the 4th, 
and was buried same day, in early evening. 

Our new caps were issued the same day. We were beginning 
to look like United States soldiers. 



SWEET BRIAR PIPES. 

The sweet briar wood grows on Hilton Head Island in great 
abundance, and was soon discovered by the Yankee soldiers. Pipes 
of various devices, carved well and ill, soon flooded the market ; and 
nearly every man, whether smoker or anti-tobacco, had a sweet briar 
pipe, cut and carved by his own or some other fellow's hand. The 
sweet briar is a root and a climbing vine. The root is the part from 
which pipes are made. It grows in no regular shape, being composed 
geuerally-of a series of bunches or bulbs of a variety of sizes, from 
that of a walnut to six inches in diameter, and of all shapes imagin- 
able, so that one may find something from which to make almost 
any model. In its green state it is white, but as it grows old and 
partially dead, it is hard and of the color of a reddish brick. 



A regimental order of the 5th required the adjutant to stand on 
the color line during roll call, opposite the center company, and that 
a commissioned officer of each company should report result of roll 
call to him. Also directed the placing of a bulletin board at the adju- 
tant's tent, on which to stick copies of orders. Another departure 
was the requiring of roll calls to be by bugle, and the bugler to be 
stationed at the adjutant's tent. The bugler was Henry S. Hamilton 
of the band. 

On the 6th the general court-martial convened (see 2 Jan.), 
and we got a mail by the Atlantic. 

Gen. Sherman reported on the 7th to the Secretary of War that 
his force was 14,768 rank and file : which included say GOO at St. 
Helena Sound, 3,000 on Port Royal Island, 200 at Fort Seward 
(Bay Point), 1,400 at Tybee, leaving about 9,500 on Hilton Head. 
Available for field : say 9,000, all infantry except one company of 
light artillery. Estimated wants for operations: 10,000 infantry 
and 1,000 cavalry, one regiment heavy artillery, one or two light 
batteries. Had just heard there were about 20,000 men in and 
about Savannah, besides the works on Skidaway Island, at Thunder- 
bolt and Green Islands and Fort Jackson. The city is being covered 
with a line of intrenchments. In concluding, he said, the force on 
our immediate front, on the railroad, is about 9,000 men. 



Jan. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 97 

Ou the same day Gov. Pickens said to Pres. Davis that he had 
been credibly informed that the telegraph operators at Wilmington, 
N.C., and Petersburg, Va., were untrue, and suggested a detective. 
That it would be ditficult for the enemy to approach Charleston with 
less than 50,000 men, and that would be by North Edisto, John's 
Island or Stono, over James Island, and endeavor to reach the Ashley 
River, about one mile above Fort Johnson ; but thought no attack 
would be made till toward Spring. 

AVe got our new coats on the 8th : the original grey was fast 
disappearing. On the 8th, also, Gen. Lee said to his Inspector- 
General that he was aware they must fight against heavy odds, but 
trusted the spirit of their soldiers would be an overmatch to the 
numbers. Had thought the enemy would seize the Charleston & 
Savannah Railroad. 

On the 9th we went on dress parade with our new (blue) uni- 
forms. Were we proud? were we lifted above our fellows? No! 
we were simply lifted up to the level of our fellows. The inference 
was plain. Had brigade drill Avith double-quick sauce, and side 
dishes of skirmishing in the woods. We covered about six miles to 
a little church in the interior. This little exercise was closed by a 
review. After this, on our own parade ground, we formed in a 
hollow square and presented Capt. Eldridge of the Steamer Atlantic 
with a massive silver trumpet. Capt. Eldridge, by his affability 
and kindly attention to the wants of the officers and men of our 
regiment during its stay on board his steamer, had endeared himself 
to them to a degree that ended in the presentation as noted. The 
presentation speech was made by Col. Fellows, to which Capt. 
Eldridge very feelingly responded. The event brought many visitors 
to our camp. 

The trumpet was made by Robert Rait & Co., New York. The 
recipient's initials, " O. E.," were engraved in Old English upon the 
tube, while on the side was chased a correct engraving of the 
Atlantic. Upon the opposite side was inscribed: "Presented to 
Capt. Oliver Eldridge of the U. S. Steamship Atlantic by the officers 
of the Third Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, for his gentle- 
manly and courteous treatment duruig the passage from Annapolis, 
Md., to Port Royal, S. C, from Oct. 15 to Nov. 7, 1861. Port 
Royal, S, C, Jan. 1, 18G2." The cost of the trumpet exceeded 
$100. Resolutions were passed. Those and Capt. Eldridge's re- 
sponse may be found in New York Herald, 24 Jan. '62. 

On the 10th, Lieut.-Col. Jackson (Col. Fellows being on a gen- 
eral court-martial), marched the regiment to Seabrook, principally 
for exercise. We arrived there about 1 p.m., and were dismissed 
for two hours, during which time the boys strolled where they liked, 
but chiefly among the negro cabins, in search of hoe cakes, fish and 
oysters. Somebody very unwisely discovered and appropriated some 
article of value; and the same being greatly missed, led to a ripple 
of excitement among the men when Col. Jackson was informed of it. 
And here was where one of Col. Jackson's characteristics was promi- 
nent. He at once became so indignant that he could scarcely wait 



98 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJan. '62. 

to have the offender discovered. The colored wench who represented 
the loser was very "shuah" she could pick out the thief; and so 
Col. Jackson and the aforesaid wench walked down between the 
lines, looking right and left as fast as she could move the bones of 
her neck. At the Colonel's command (and it was n't long in -coming) 
we had fallen in and opened ranks (" Front rank, about face !") for 
the ordeal. She selected several (so says a diary) ; but all stoutly 
denied the allegation and inwardly defied the "alligator." Such was 
Col. Jackson's indignation (firstly), and (secondly) chagrin at not 
finding the guilty party, that we were at once put en route for our 
camp. 

On arriving at camp we had a good mail, and our minds were 
soon cleared of Seabrook visions. 

A little episode of the 11th, though not directly a Third New 
Hampshire item, is considered worthy of insertion. An oflBcer 

of the had resigned, sending the document to Gen. 

Sherman direct. Gen. Sherman referred back at once to Gen. Viele. 
The resigning officer gave, as reasons for his action : that he was 
not a citizen of the United States ; and that being the case, the 
political international troubles then existing between the European 
powers and the United States demanded his withdrawal from all 
military organizations whatever for the time being, he preferring to 
remain neutral in the troubles that might issue therefrom. He con- 
cluded bis resignation in these words : " I therefore make this, my 
resignation, immediate and uucouditional." 

Gen. Sherman endorsed back as follows : " This communication 
is referred back to Gen. Viele, for proper notice to be taken of an 
oflScer of his command who has sworn to bear true allegiance to the 
United States, but who nevertheless forswears the same in this 
communication . " 

Gen. Viele at once required the offender to make a copy of the 
(his) oath of allegiance by his own hand, and on receipt of it pro- 
ceeded to soundly "spank" him in a special order (No. 5). The 
closing language of the order was as follows : — 

It would appear, however, that Capt. claims to have regarded 

the compact of honor and patriotism — the sacred pledge by which he has 
become one of the thousands who, forgetting every other tie, have come 
forward with a devotion unparalleled in the history of any other country, 
to maintain unsullied their country's honor, and uphold her laws — as a 
simple contract to be dissolved at his pleasure. It is hoped that he stands 
alone in this extraordinary view of his position ; and let no other man who 
has pledged before heaven his life to this cause forget that pledge until 

victory shall have dissolved the compact. It is hoped that Capt. will 

seek in future to show by his devotion to duty that he no longer misunder- 
stands his position. 

This order was. read on parade to all the troops of the brigade, 
and created quite a stir. 

Same day, Gen. Sherman appointed a Post Council of Adminis- 
tration, consisting of Colonels Fellows, Third New Hampshire ; 
Perry, Forty-eighth New York ; and Rich, Ninth Maine : to audit 
accounts of the Post Sutler (to assemble 13th). 



Jan. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 99 

On the 11th the first mention was found by the writer regarding 
a balloon. The process of filling it began the 11th. The intended 
use was obvious ; but the writer has never been able to find that its 
service was of real value. It was seen by us at James Island in 
June, 18()2, prior to the Secessionville fight, and was being towed 
up the river by a gunboat. It was intended to be a great factor in 
the Department, but probably was found to be impracticable, and 
was laid away and mourned itself to death (rotted) . 

Another brigade drill the 11th : Gen. Viele meant that we should 
be proficient in that healthful exercise. 

An order that day from Headquarters of the Army (reaching 
our Department probably within a week thereafter) created a new 
Department: "Key West," embracing Key West, the Tortugas and 
the mainland from Apalachicola (west) to Cape Canaveral (east), 
and assigning Brig. -Gen. J. M. Brannan to its command. 

As we had another review on the 12th, it would appear that we 
were being hastened into a state of proficiency, ready for some new 
movement. Although it was Sunday, we had a brigade drill and no 
sermon, though somebody had time to organize a Sabbath School in 
the Third New Hampshire. 

On the 13th Gen. Wool, commanding at Fortress Monroe, was 
directed to send the Steamer Constitution (then hourly expected at 
Fort Monroe from Boston, with troops), on its arrival, to Port 
Royal with the troops, to reinforce Sherman. This regiment was 
the Thirtieth Massachusetts ; but the order to divert was counter- 
manded, and the regiment went to Ship Island, as was originally 
intended. 

Brigade drill again. 

All orders heretofore issued from Headquarters of Department 
had been written as emanating from " Headquarters Fxpeditionary 
Corps, etc. ;" and in fact one of the 13th bore those words. That 
was Special Order 33, relieving Col. Fellows from the Post Council 
of Administration (he being on a general court-martial) , and 
appointing Col. Brown, Third Rhode Island, in his stead. 

We tind on the 14th an order (General Order 1) — apparently 
an attempt to separate into minor districts ; for the order appointed 
Lieut. M. S. James, Third Rhode Island, as Post Adjutant. A 
detail of 500 men on the intrenchmeuts. 

Gen. Sherman sent a report on the loth, to Washington, calling 
attention to the negro question ; and asked for instructions as to 
their future maintenance and instruction, and recommended that 
suitable instructors be sent ; and asked for negro clothing, including 
stuff for Avomen's and children's wear. 

The 1 6th, items were brief. It rained ; there was no drill or 
dress parade ; and four men arrived from Annapolis (left behind 
sick 18 Oct. 1861). 

Gen. Lee notified Gen. Trapier, commanding in Florida, on the 
16th, that arrangements had been made for running into Mosquito 
Inlet, on the east coast of Florida, arms and amimmition, by means 
of small, fast steamers ; and directed Gen. Trapier to place two 



100 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. l-Ian. '62. 

moderate -sized guus at New Smyrna to protect in case they were 
chased in ; and said it was hoped that two steamers will arrive within 
ten or fifteen days ; that two Parrott guus were at Fernandina, that 
could be sent to St. John's River. 

The rebel capital also received word from its representative at 
Brunswick, Ga., that that post was continually blockaded by a heavy 
side-wheel steamer, and to warn away any expected blockade runners 
from Nassau. 

A regimental hospital item of the 16th said : "On duty in No. 
1 till 4 P.M., then in Log Cabin Hospital. Three men sick: two 
very sick, and both crazy." 

The officers composing the general court-martial in session 
at the Head (as we then called the headquarters of Hilton Head 
Island) were changed on the 17th, the Judge Advocate — Capt. 
John Hamilton, Third U. S. Artillery — being relieved by Lieut. 
Noyes, Second U. S. Cavalry, and Capt. Hamilton being appointed 
Chief of Artillery of the Department. Maj. Beard, Forty-eighth 
New York, was that day appointed Provost Marshal, relieving Maj. 
Gardner, Seventh Connecticut. Mail. 

Lee said further to Ripley that the enemy was evidently prepar- 
ing to land on Bohicket Creek, near West Seabrook, and push 
forward to Rantoul's Creek or Legareville. 

There were 500 men on the iutrenchments on the 18th; thirty 
more were at work unloading vessels ; and the Adjutant got a stove 
set up in his tent. The latter shows that we were not very close to 
the equator. Lieut. Van Brunt of the Forty-seventh New York was 
appointed Assistant Provost Marshal. The same day, Lieut. Wil- 
son, the Chief Engineer of the expedition, reported to Gen. Sher- 
man that he had made a reconnoissance of the channels, etc., from 
Tj'bee Roads by Bloody Point, through Bull River, Wall's Cut and 
Wright River, to the Savannah, and found the gunboats could pass 
at high water into the Savannah about two miles above Pulaski. 

Gen. Sherman directed on the 18th that all able-bodied contra- 
bands be set at work, and fixed their pay as follows : — 

Meclianics under -tS . . . . 9 to 12 dollars per month. 

" over 45 .... 8 to — " " " 

Laborers, 15 to 20 .... 5 to 8 " 

" over 45 .... 5 to 6 " " " 

The reader is now to be introduced to a Board of Survey. It 
is not a formidable or a dangerous body. Such Boards were fre- 
quent and to a certain extent unimportant to this history, and but 
few will be introduced lest the reader be " bored." A barrel of beef 
issued to Co. C by Lieut. Thompson, our Acting Commissary, was 
thought to be a little "off color:" and hence, Lieut.-Col. Jackson, 
by Special Order 10, on the 18th appointed a Board of Survey, con- 
sisting of Capts. Plimpton (E), Littlefield (K), and Carlton (I), 
to sit on that beef and say what ailed it. They sat, tasted, saw 
and were satisfied to report that the aforesaid beef was unfit for use, 
owing to excessive saltpetre. This condemned it ; and it was thrown 
away, and better issued in its stead. This was the process in such 



Jan. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 101 

cases. A company or an officer cannot offhand say, " This is n.g. : 
bury it, boys," and be entitled to another barrel. It must be sat 
on officially. 

Notwithstanding the 19th Avas the holy Sabbath, we had a 
brigade drill and review, and the usual dress parade. And notwith- 
standing all this, the religious element in the regiment, led by our 
Chaplain, that day fully organized the Sunday School (mentioned a 
week ago) . There were four classes, and the leaders of them were 
Chaplain Hill, Dr. Moulton, Capt. Plimpton and Capt. Raudlett. 
Gen. Viele the same day directed Col. Fellows to select from his 
regiment five active, intelligent young men, to be attached to 
Hamilton's Light Battery, Third U. S. Artillery, and report to Gen. 
Yiele at 8 a.m. on the morrow. Who will they be? The 20th 
developed who were the chosen ones. They were : James B. Henry 
of B, Joseph W. Damon of F, Geo. T. Sessions of G, Myrick 
Burgess of I, and Chas. J. Andrews of K. 

The other events of the day were, that Gen. Sherman directed 
that no improper information should be given to the press and thence 
to the enemy, and established rules governing such matters ; and 
also as to the arrival and departure of persons on vessels. He also 
reported to AVashington that he believed Savannah might be taken 
by combined operation of the arm}^ and navy by the river, and save 
slow and expensive process of bombarding Pulaski, and closed his 
letter to send on the Atlantic, which he had kept waiting. 

Gen. Viele directed that no more bushes be cut down in the 
vicinity of camps, urged cleanliness, and directed a bugler to be at 
his headquarters to sound the calls. 

Col. Fellows on the 21st directed that no officer should be 
absent from drills or dress parade without permission, except on 
duty or sick. We got orders that day to be ready to move, and 
knapsacks were packed. The Third (Wright's) Brigade began to 
move, and we surely expected to go. They embarked, but did not 
leave the harbor. A part of the First Massachusetts Cavalry were 
encamped within half a mile of us the 21st, having recently arrived 
within the Department. 

The embarkation of the Third Brigade was completed on the 
22d. 

The rebel War Department notified Gen. Ripley the 22d, at 
Charleston, that an otHcer of the Confederate service, who had 
recently been a prisoner in Boston [Fort Warren, probably. — D. E.] 
had reached Norfolk, and said reports at the North were that two 
persons, prompted by heavy bribes, had left there to burn the princi- 
pal bridges on the Wilmington & Charleston Railroad, and that the 
Burnside Expedition was to take the railroad and then both fleets 
take Charleston & Savannah Railroad, and thus isolate Charleston. 

An unusual proceeding took place the 2 2d, and that proceeding 
actually fixed the date from which Quincy A. Gillmore began his 
rapid upward progress. He was then a Captain of Engineers and 
a very promising young man (see personal sketch). Col. Serrell of 
the New York Volunteer Engineers, by virtue of his rank, was 



102 L THIKD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Jan. '62. 

entitled to consideration. It was evident that he wasn't liked — 
not only then by Gen. Sherman, Imt certainly later, by Gillmore; 
Gen. Sherman had pushed Gillmore ahead and was bound to push 
him forward. The unusual proceeding was that Gen. Sherman 
issued an order appointing Capt. Q. A. Gillmore " a Brigadier-Gen- 
eral of Volunteers, subject to the approval of the President," and 
assigned him to duty in command of all the Engineer forces of the 
Department. And in the same order he appointed Adam Badeau, 
Esq., as a volunteer aide on his (Sherman's) staff. Mr. Badeau 
was a newspaper reporter at the time ; but he got ahead so fast 
from this little start given him by Gen. Sherman, that we soon find 
him spoken of as Gen. Badeau ; and he it was who had the unpleas- 
antness, after the war, with the Grant family, the main question 
being, "Did Grant or did Badeau write the Memoirs of U. S. 
Grant?" 

The Third Brigade sailed on the 23d, Florida-ward, though it 
was a stormy day. 

The general court-martial, of which Col. Fellows was presi- 
dent, was dissolved on the 24th. The court convened the 6th ; and 
during the interval we find Col. Fellows had nominal command of 
the regiment and did some duty ; biit the actual commanding officer 
was Lieut.-Col. Jackson. 

Another movement was inaugurated on the 25th : for the Forty- 
eighth New York (of our brigade) and Gen. Viele (our brigade 
commander) left the island via Seabrook, and went to Daufuskie 
Island, nearer Savannah than Hilton Head and on the right bank of 
the Savannah Kiver. Detail that day, 500 men, though a part of 
them returned early in the day. 

Co. F went off on picket. Upon Gen. Viele's departure, Col. 
Fellows, being the ranking officer, took command of the brigade on 
the 26th. Capt. Donohoe of Co. C, with 40 men of his company, 
were detailed as body guard to Gen. Sherman. On the 27th, we 
find Col. Fellows commanding the Post (of Hilton Head) . 

At this point there was a variation in dates. Two diaries said, 
under date of 27th, that the expedition sailed that day: /. e., 
Wright's Brigade. One of the diaries added, " Our regiment 
regretted they could not go." 

The Matanzas arrived the 27th, bringing a mail, in which was 
the first new commission. It was for Sergt.-Maj. Thomas M. Jack- 
son to be 2d Lieut., vice Geo. W. Jackson of E, resigned. 

On the 28th we got the Matanzas mail ; and we also got our 
ears cheered by rapid firing in the direction of Savannah. This was 
"Wright's reconnoissance below Pulaski. 

Additional hospital accommodations were being worked on the 
28th by a detail of twenty- five men. 

On the 29th Gen. Lee reported to his Secretary of War that the 
enemy was at work removing obstructions in Wall's Cut. [This cut is 
a link in the line of inland water communication between Charleston 
and Savannah.] Said the obstruction was a large schooner, with 
row of piles each side, and that a similar obstruction was in Wil- 



Jan. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 103 

mington Narrows. If the enemy succeeds iu removing the obsta- 
cles, said he, there is nothing to prevent his reaching the Savannah 
River ; and we have nothing afloat that can contend against him. 
He further said that the connections between Savannah and Fort 
Pulaski would then be cut off. The latter, he reported, had four 
months' provisions. Said he had sunk the floating dock of Savannah 
that day in Wilmington Narrows. 

A. D. Hammond of Co. I died the morning of the 29th, in our 
hospital, and was buried at night. He had been taken to the hos- 
pital only the day before, sick with congestive fever. Co. H went 
on picket. We learned that Capt. Donohoe, with his detail of 40 
men, were having a good time doing duty (!) on the Steamer Mc- 
Clellan, which plied the water thereabouts, with Gen. Sherman on 
board. 

We heard heavy firing again in* the direction of Pulaski on the 
30th. 

On the 31st Gen. AVright suggested to Gen. Sherman a descent 
upon Amelia Island, taking Fernandina and the railroad ; the navy 
to co-operate. 

On the 31st, also, Thomas M. Jackson was duly announced as 
a 2d Lieutenant in Co. E, and Private Elbridge J. Copp of Co. F 
was made Sergeaut-Major, vice T. M. Jackson, promoted. A de- 
tail went to Braddock's Point the 31st on a reeonnoissance. The 
Chaplain and Surgeon Moulton accompanied the party. The drill 
and dress parade were under Maj. Bedel that day. 



THE WATCH FEVER. 

During the winter of 1861-62 our camp was visited with the 
"watch fever," so called; and it raged with such fury at one time 
that nearlj^ every man was affected with it, and had a watch in each 
pocket. Many got nipped so badly by their first trade, that it also 
became their last one. The desire for watch trading ran so high 
that small knots of men could be seen hovering over a few embers, 
almost into the small hours of the night (morning) , trading watches. 
The guards were finally instructed to arrest anyone who appeared 
like a. watch fiend, after taps. The fever turned after awhile, as all 
fevers do, and soon thereafter disappeared, and with it the legion of 
watches, good, bad and indifferent, that had been scattered through 
the regiment. Where they all came from, or where they went to, no 
fellow could find out. 



104 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Jan. '62. 



SUPPLEMENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

The War Department instructed the recruiting parties on the 
11th not to recruit for other than their own regiment. 

Another War Department order of the 18th directed that gui- 
dons and camp colors be made like the U. S. flag, with stars and 
stripes. 

Private letters to persons in the enemy's country, if received by 
officers of the army for transmission, are to be sent to the Dead Let- 
ter^Office, except for (to) prisoners of war (29 Jan.) 



Department Statistics for January, 1862, are : total troops. 18,- 
571 ; wounded and sick, 5,029 ; died, 52 ; hospital cases, wounded, 
etc., 180 ; died of wounds, etc., 4. 



The Monthly Return shows 



Field and Staff 
Band . . . 



Co. A 

B 

C 

D 

E 

F 

G 

H 

I 

K 

Present aggregate 
Aggregate last report 



982 
985 



ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 



Sergeants 555555 

Corporals 88 8 888 

Absent sick 

Detached 8 44 6 1 

Died of disease 10 10 

Discharged for disability ..000000 

Loss by "transfer 10 

Gained by transfer . . . . o o 10 
Band, disch. for disability 



1 

1 1 



Recruits required 



2 1 ;3 4 



6 14 6 12 12 65 



KKBRXJARY, 1862. 




N SUNDAY, the 2d, we had a review, inspection, etc. 
Co. A was at work on the fortifications, and Co. G on 
outlying picket. The Ninth Maine were ordered away 
that day, and we were expecting similar orders. 

Next day our Colonel (Fellows), in command of the 
Post, directed the daily appointment of a Field Othcer of 
the Day. Gen. Wright, with troops lying on steamers in 
Warsaw Sound, reported that the storm had delayed him, but 
he would be ready to move the moment the navy was. The Ninth 
Maine went to Seabrook. Sanitation, and all that was implied by it, 
was apparently near the top in Gen. Sherman's mind ; and he was 
deserving of great credit for it. He required us, on the oth, to take 
down all our tents and clean up the ground, and let it dry before set- 
ting them up again. He reported to Quartermaster-Gen. Meigs the 
5th, that the expected light draught steamers, wagons, boats, etc., 
had not yet arrived, and said further that the season had so far ad- 
vanced he could do little except to garrison the coast. Said Savannah 
should have been in his possession by that time, "but not in the way 
expected by the anxious public on our arrival here : for of all the vis- 
ionary and impracticable ideas," said he, "that could have been in- 
vented, nothing could have equalled that of marching on Savannah 
when we landed here." 

Gen. Lee said to his Chief Ordnance Officer, the 5th, that O. G. 
Parsley ct Co., of Wilmington, had bought a whole stock of iron of 
Weed, Council & Co., principal importers of iron, at market price 
(and also government price — 12 and 16 cents), and had offered it 
for sale. And Lee said further that he had directed that all iron re- 
quired by the Confederate States should be taken and paid for at the 
original price : for this seemed to him so palpable a case of specula- 
tion, that it ought to be stopped. 

The Baltic arrived with a mail and a battalion of the First 
Massachusetts Cavalry. 

2d Lieut. W. H. Miles of Co. K was discharged on the 6th, on 
his resignation. Cos. B and D went on picket. Another detail 
went to Braddock's Point. Maj. Beard of the Forty-eighth New 
York reported to Gen. Sherman that he had reconnoitered in the 
Wright River and its tributaries, and found a rebel camp just below 
Fort Jackson, with about 700 men. 

(105) 



106 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. ^Feb. '62. 

Geu. Shermau apparent!}' received advice from Washiugton ; 
for on the fith he issued an order regarding the blacks, arranging 
for their government. He said there was to be volunteer instructors 
to teach young and old the rudiments of civilization and Christianity, 
their amenability to the laws of God and man, their relation to each 
other as social beings, and all that was necessary to render them 
competent to sustain themselves in social and business pursuits. He 
further said there would be two general agents appointed — one to 
superintend the administration and agricultural interests, and the 
other the educational. He closed by appealing to the benevolent 
people North to supply clothing, etc. 

Lieut. -Col. Jackson on the 7th ordered a Board of Survey to sit 
on a lot of maggotty and rotten sides of bacon. They sat on the lot 
very effectually. 

The rebel Secretary of War on the 7th directed Gen. Bragg at 
Pensacola to send 20 heavy guns to Savannah, as he understood 
from Gen. Lee that they could be spared. 

Gen. Shermau again heard that some one had stolen a rooster, 
and issued an order on the 8th, forbidding all such unmilitary con- 
duct, and directed all violators to be court-martialed. The same 
day Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, ordered that Maj. Beard, Forty- 
eighth New York, be relieved as Provost Marshal. 

Gov. Brown of Georgia suggested on the 8th to Gen. Lee that 
if Brunswick and Savannah could not both be held, to hold Savannah 
at any cost and any hazard, and that if his home was in the city he 
would fight for it as long as possible, and if driven from it by an 
overpowering force, he would never permit its roof to shelter the 
enemy, but would leave it in smoking ruins wheu driven from it. 
These cheering words must have braced up Lee. 

The sequel to the demand on Bragg for his guns, at Pensacola, 
was his reply wherein he said he could not spare a gun, but had made 
requisition for more. 

From a letter of the 8th to the Exeter (N.H.) Ballot, the fol- 
lowing new points have been gleaned : Chas. F. French of Co. H, John 
L. King of Co. F, and Harrison J. Copp of Co. A, were nurses in 
regimental hospital. Sergt. J. M. Head of Co. B was sick in same. 
2d Lieut. Jackson went to Co. B (instead of E, as at first supposed). 
A photograph saloon had been opened at the Head by a lieutenant in 
the Engineer regiment. Lieut. Fogg had recently returned to Co. B, 
and "had a hill of potatoes nearly a foot high." 

The reader will see that we were getting very domesticated. 

We find Lieut. Jackson on duty as a 2d Lieutenant for the 
first time, on the 9th, as Officer of the Guard, while Capt. Dunbar 
filled the position of Field Officer of the Day. The Foi'ty-seventh 
New York left Hilton Head the 9th for some island (probably 
Edisto) between there and Charleston. 

For Geu. Lee's comfort, he got word the 9th from his Secretary 
of War that he would send him during the week five 8-in. Colum- 
biads and one 24-pounder howitzer ; and also said he had ordered 
for him 1,000 Enfield rifles and 20,000 lbs. cannon powder. 



Feb. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 107 

Here is more consolation from Gen. Floyd at Apalachicola, who 
reported it to be his firm conviction that but few of the troops there 
would enlist in the service of the Confederacy. Gen. Lee on the 9th 
was disturbed by an order from his Secretary of War to send immedi- 
ately to Norfolk 10,000 lbs. cannon powder, and promising to send 
Lee 20,000 lbs. just received by the Kate (a runner, of course). 
Gen. Sherman estimated, in a letter of the 9th to Washington, that 
we had about 9,000 blacks in our lines, which of course meant the 
entire Department. 

We find Lee in trouble again on the 10th; for he suggested to 
his Secretary of War his inability to hold St. Simons and Jekyls 
Islands, if the fleet should attack. [He referred to Wright's troops.] 
Said Brunswick had been depopulated, and suggested early notice to 
blockade runners, so they may not attempt to run into Brunswick. 

We had no parade the 10th. Lieut. Ayer, with a large detail, 
was building a road, and Cos. C and E were on picket. 

Lee communicated with Gov. Brown the 10th, relative to the 
removal of troops from St. Simons and Jekyls Islands. 

Gen. Wright that da}' notified Gen. Sherman that he had landed 
his troops on AVarsaw Island and had sent the Marion to Hilton 
Head for supplies, and that the rebels were very active on Skidaway 
Battery. We had a hard frost on the night of the 10th, also one on 
the 4th. 

The Baltic left on the 10th with a mail, the first (mail) for three 
weeks. Such a long intei-val must have caused considerable anxiety 
at home. 

Gen. Yiele appears to have so far established himself at Dau- 
fuskie Island that on the 10th he issued his General Order No. 1, 
from "Headquarters United States Forces, North Bank of the 
Savannah." 

Daniel F. Colby of Co. A died on the 11th and was buried the 
same day. The negroes were ginning cotton that day at Drayton's 
Plantation. The Mayor of Augusta, Ga., called the attention of 
Gov. Brown on the 11th to the defenceless condition of the city, that 
large quantities of cotton were stored there and that powder and arms 
factories were being erected near the city, and offering to obstruct 
the river. Gov. Brown also received word from the colonel of the 
Tenth Georgia Militia that some apprehension was felt in Augusta 
that the enemy would take Savannah, and then go up the river to 
Augusta. He said 82,000 bales of cotton were stored there, and 
suggested the erection of batteries along the river. 

We began to sign the pay-rolls on the 12th. Lieut. Ayer was 
transferred to Co. E, and Lieut. Smith to Co. I that day. Capt. 
Plimpton was detailed to build and manage a saw mill, to get out 
lumber for various purposes. 

McClellan to Sherman (12th) : "Gen. Meigs informs me he has 
ordered a large number of small boats ; and I have a despatch from 
Philadelphia today about shipping 48 surf boats to Port Royal." He 
suggested that by reducing garrison to minimum, a successful com- 
bined attack might be made on Savannah, as soon as Pulaski had 
fallen. 



108 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. {Feb. '62. 

Our Major had the handling of the regiment on the 12th, both 
on drill and parade. 

The General-in-Chief ordered Sherman to send 300 or 400 con- 
trabands to Key West, for work on the public works there. 

The 13th of February arrived, and every diary made a note of 
of it : for on that day we got paid off for two months. Some diaries 
even had an entry like this: "The boys got tight today." What 
could such am])iguous language mean? 

The Eighth Maine was ordered, the 13th, to pack up. On that 
date our men were putting floors in their tents — a very wise move- 
ment. Cos. I and K were on picket. 

Gen. McClellan to Gen. Sherman, under date of 14th, said he 
that day for the first time saw his (Gen. Shei'mau's) requisition for 
siege train for Savannah. Despatch received about your occupation 
of Daufuskie. He advised the close blockade of Pulaski and its 
bombardment, and said he did not consider Savannah worth a siege 
after Pulaski was taken. Said the greatest moral effect would be 
produced by a reduction of Charleston, "because there," said he, 
"the rebellion had its birth, and there the hatred of our government 
is the most intense. To gain Fort Sumter and hold Charleston, is a 
task well worthy your greatest efforts and considerable sacrifices. 
Study the problem. Meantime make no attempt on Savannah except 
by a C0U2J de main; concentrate at Pulaski and Fernandina, taking 
St. Augustine by way of an interlude, etc." Stephen Bartell of Co. 
E was very sick on the 14th in regimental hospital. Taken with 
bleeding at nose — had to be plugged — mortification set in. Poor 
fellow ! his time was short. Five companies of the Eighth Maine 
left Hilton Head the 14th for Daufuskie Island. 

As we had been paid off, there was a great amount of money 
sent home, and our Chaplain was "taking it in" all day. 

Gen. Lee's attention was called again, the 14th, to the defense- 
less condition of Augusta, Ga. He also says he was informed by 
Gen. Ripley that the enemy was landing at Edisto ; and more troops 
should be sent there at once. 

The following men were detailed the 14th by Col. Fellows, 
Commanding Post, to report to Capt. Plimpton for duty at the new 
saw mill: H. O. Squires, E. G. Brown, J. D. Leavitt, R. A. Chellis, 
J. Batchelder and Alden George of Co. A ; Terrence O'Brien of Co. 
C; C. A. Barrett, Stephen Hadley, D. W. Shaw and A. J. Hadley 
of Co. E : John Yelton and Abram Pearl of Co. I ; Wm. B. Parker 
of Co. D ; W. H. Tj^ler, Edgar Wordsworth, Wm. Wilson and N. 
Liudsley of Co. G. 

The Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania left Hilton Head the 14th to re- 
inforce the Forty-seventh New York at Edisto. 

The loth was one of peculiar interest. Gen. Sherman notified 
Washington that Gen. Viele had erected a battery of six siege guns 
on Venus Point, Jones Island, Savannah River, on the night of the 
11th, without molestation; and to erect another at the head of Long 
Island would make the blockade complete. [These were both above 
Pulaski and on opposite sides of the river. — D. E.] Wright's 



Feb. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 109 

troops, he further said, were yet in Warsaw Sound, waiting for the 
navy. The delays since middle of January had grieved him almost 
to a state of mortification. We can work, said he, six weeks longer, 
probably twelve. We want at once all the transportation that has 
been asked for ; also the mortars and siege guns — now gradu- 
ally arriving — and 10,000 infantry. Savannah is out of the ques- 
tion with our present force, etc. The indorsement on the foregoing 
by Gen. McClellan was substantially "The 10,000 infantry not 
available. Recommend Sherman to reduce Pulaski in preference to 
attempting Savannah." 

Col. Moore of the Forty-seventh New York (at Edisto) reported 
that his regiment was occupying the island, and confidently asserted 
that if 10,000 men could be sent there, they could be in Charleston 
in less than three days. Lee, at Savannah, was slightly disturbed ; 
for he said to Ripley, on the 15th, that there was abundant evidence 
of the presence of the enemy, on land and water, in his vicinity. 
[This referred to Viele and the batteries. — D. E.] 

Col. Fellows issued an order from Headquarters of the Post, on 
the 15th, regarding the improper divulging of the countersign to en- 
listed men, and enjoined all officers to see to it that the articles of 
war i-ef erring to it be strictly obeyed. 

Alfred York of E died the 15th, after lying unconscious for 84 
hours. Wm. Leavitt of Co. B also died the same day. 

Gen. Viele, at Daufuskie, was chagrined by seeing a rebel steamer 
(the Ma) run past his batteries on tlie 15th, before the ranges could 
be obtained, and proceed to Pulaski Avith supplies. His brigade 
headquarters at Hilton Head were discontinued the 15th, and our 
regimental report had to be sent to division headquarters. Things 
were a little mixed just then, and that day it could hardly be stated 
what brigade we belonged to, if any. The money was being poured 
into the Chaplain's lap all day, the 15th, for friends at home. 

An order of the 15th, from headquarters of the army, provided 
that when chapel tents are purchased by regiments, they shall be 
transported the same as tents for soldiers. Truly they were not un- 
mindful of our wants at Washington. 

The 16th was also full of interest. Poor Stephen Bartlett of E 
died at 10 p.m., the Chaplain being engaged with him almost to the 
last moment. Alfred York of E, who died the 15th, was buried the 
16th. He was followed to his last resting place by a twin brother, 
his father and an uncle (all of Third New Hampshire). 

The rebel steamer Ida attempted to run back to Savannah the 
1 6th, under cover of four gunboats sent down near our batteries for 
the purpose ; but Gen. Viele was ready for them, and the Ida ran 
back to Pulaski, and the four gunboats to Savannah, the latter tow- 
ing the flag boat, in a disabled condition. Bravo, Viele ! 

We laid Stephen Bartlett away on the 17th, and Wm. R. Leav- 
itt of Co. B lay very sick with congestive fever. Our family of a 
thousand was being slowly but surely diminished by the fell de- 
stroyer. 

Gen. Lee recommended to Col. Olmstead, commanding at Fort 
Pulaski, that certain changes be made in the positions of the guns 



110 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. ^Feh. '62. 

on the fort, and told him his communications with Savannah there- 
after would be by light boats over the marsh and through "Wilming- 
ton Narrows, to Caustens Bluff, or other mode at his discretion. 

Gen. Sherman, by his General Order 11, forbade further flags 
of truce, except on emergency, without orders from his headquarters. 
All day long the Chaplain received money for the express company. 
A diary of the 17th announced a startling occurrence of that date. 
It said, in language bold, "Beer for sale." It would appear that 
we had had no beer from 18 Oct. 1861, to that 17 Feb. 1862, with 
all the resulting evils of what might properly be termed a ' ' beer 
drought." 

Gen. Ripley, on the 18th, at Charleston, reported to Lee the re- 
cent success of the enemy at Fort Donelson, and said the probabili- 
ties were that Charleston and Savannah would be the next points. 
Said he had in his district only 4,569 effective men, and that Gen. 
Evans, whose district was next southerly, had only 1,500 effectives. 

The same day Lee said to Gov. Brown that he was unwilling to 
order the burning of Brunswick without his approval ; and the same 
day Lee asked his Secretary of War to approve a proposition to burn 
Brunswick, and informed him that the St. Simons and Jekjds Island 
batteries had been evacuated. 

Wm..B. Leavitt of B died the 18th; and there was no dress 
parade. The Secretary of War directed the Assistant Quartermas- 
ter-General at New York to furnisli transportation, etc., to Port 
Royal, to certain cotton agents and instructors, and also asked Gen. 
Sherman to furnish them with protection. On their arrival and af- 
terward these latter were called " Gideonites." 

To inspire the army with patriotism and to do its best, the fare- 
well order of Gen. Washington was published in full the 18th, in a 
general order from Headquarters of the Army ; and it was directed 
thai it be read at every military post and at head of every regiment 
and corps. The approaching anniversary of the birthday of the 
" Father of his Country " undoubtedly had something to do with this. 

Leavitt of B was buried the 19th, with military honors. Sergt. 
" Jonty" Dow (Jonathan N. Dow) of D, our Color Sergeant, was 
very low on the 19th with typhoid fever. 

Geo. A. Allen of F, Charles Robinson of E and Mitchell 
Bridge of I, went home the 19 th on the Atlantic, discharged for 
disability. 

On the 20th, at 10.30 p.m., poor "Jonty" passed from earth 
away. He was the first man from Hampton to die. He was beloved 
and respected by all. He left a wife and young daughter. A new 
guard-house was being built for the guard on the 20th. 

The Twenty-eighth Massachusetts (reinforcements) arrived 
on the 21st on the Ericsson. Mail. One hundred men were 
detailed away from camp. We mournfully laid poor " Jonty" Dow 
in a soldier's grave. Gen. Sherman forbade the banking up of 
tents and urged cleanliness. 

Gov. Brown of Georgia said to Gen. Lee the 21st that he was 
willing and ready to have Brunswick burned. Col. Fellows, Com- 



Feb. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. HI 

mandiDg Post, issued an order wherein he said he learned with 
regret that officers were engaged in selling sutler's stores, and for- 
bade all such in future. Could it be that a horrible rumor had 
reached him that the Chaplain was selling letter paper and envelopes 
to the men ? Horrid thought ! It cannot — must not — be forbidden ! 

About this time, Lieut. -Col. AVoodbury, Aide-de-Camp to Gen. 
Barnard (U. S. Army), outlined a plan, or series of plans, of opera- 
tion against Charleston. Gen, Barnard was Chief Engineer, Army 
of the Potomac. He at once sent the plans to Gen. McClellan, then 
Commander-in-Chief ; but there w\as no evidence that they ever got 
beyond the latter's hands. The plans were very elaborate, and the 
details very minute. A portion of them were actually followed; 
but it is presumable that such acts were accidentally like Lieut. -Col. 
Woodbury's plan, in part. 

Washington's Birthday, the 22d of February, 1862, arrived. 
The day was celebrated by salutes all over the island and in the 
harbor. We had no drill, but did have dress parade. Adjt. 
Hill was serenaded by the band. The Twenty-eighth Massachusetts 
landed. The following changes in D were made, vice "Jonty," 
deceased : Corp. Abram Dow to Sergeant, Privates D. Perkins and 
C. E. Johnson to Corporals, and Corporal Tucker reduced. 

Though it was a holiday, Lee had occasion to say to Gov. 
Brown that the railroad connection between Savannah and Charles- 
ton was very precarious, and suggested another by way of Augusta, 
involving only one-fourth of a mile of new road, or another involv- 
ing more than twice the distance. An order of the 2 2d, from Head- 
quarters of the Army, directed that regimental colors be inscribed 
with the names of battles in which the regiment had borne a merito- 
rious part. 

The Chaplain preached to us at 9 a.m. on Sunday, the 23d, and 
at a later hour to the Eighth Maine. 

Gen. Sherman wrote that day to Gen. McClellan that the 
Harriet Lane had just arrived. We have now, said he, two batteries 
of six guns each, on the Savannah River, — one on Venus Point, 
Jones Island, and the other at upper end of Bird Island (Georgia 
side), — and the river is effectually blocked. He further said the 
nav}' was not quite ready for Fernandina, and that Pulaski was 
reported to have six to ten months' provisions, but only two days' 
ammunition. 

Capt. Wilbur, 1st Lieut. Allen and 2d Lieut. Marsh were on 
the 24th appointed a Board of Survey, by Col. Fellows, Command- 
ing Post, for service disconnected with the regiment. 

Lee was notified the 24th by his Secretary of War, that owing 
to their recent reverses in Tennessee, it was a stern necessity that 
they withdraw their lines to defensible limits, and directed him (Lee) 
to send all the troops on the Florida seaboard at once, by quickest 
route, to Gen. A. S. Johnston, in Tennessee, only reserving enough 
to defend Apalachicola River. And Lee notified Gov. Brown that 
it would be necessary for the citizens of Florida to turn out to a 
man to defend their homes ; and no troops would be drawn from 



112 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [i^ /-. '65. 

other States for the purpose. Lee also instructed Geu. Trapier that 
in withdrawing from St. Simons and Jekyls Islands he mount logs 
in imitation of the guns removed. 

Gen. Sherman was apparently moving about with his staff, 
preparatory to some movement of troops : for on the 24th we find 
him on the steam transport McCleUan, in the harbor of Port Royal; 
and from that vessel he issued an order that during his absence 
Gen. Viele or the senior officer present was authorized to act. 

[Note. — Gen. Viele was at Daufuskie, Gen. Stevens at Beaufort, and 
Gen. Wright at Warsaw Sound.] 

Capt. Dunbar, on the 25th, relieved Capt. Wilbur on the Board 
of Survey appointed the 24th ; and the Board had added to its 
original duties the fixing of values upon certain articles of clothing 
which were to be furnished to contrabands. This is apparently 
ample proof that such clothing had arrived in response to Gen, 
Sherman's request. 

The Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania left Hilton Head the 25th, destina- 
tion unknown then, but proved to be P^disto Island, where the 
Forty-seventh New York previously went and then was. Three of 
their sick were left with us, in our hospital : one a little drummer 
boy of twelve years. 

Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, on the 26th ordered a muster 
to take place on the 28th, naming in nearly every case the com- 
manding officer as the mustering officer. 

The Wabash left the harbor the 26th. Its absence, in connec- 
tion with that of Gen. Sherman, probably was of import to us. We 
learned of the latter's whereabouts : for he was lying off Tybee, 
and said it was his intention to accompany Wright's Expedition to 
Fernandina ; but hearing that Brunswick and the forts at St. 
Simons had been evacuated, had decided to return to Hilton Head. 
He reported the Savannah then closed as tight as a bottle between 
Savannah and Pulaski, and said preparations at Tybee for bombard- 
ing Pulaski were being pushed. 

Gen. McClellan was notified by Gen. Sherman, under date of 
28th: That deserters from Savannah said there were 65,000 men in 
and about that' city, and they were well fortified on land and river; 
that the small forts had been stripped. That the Massachusetts 
regiment had arrived [probably Twenty-eighth Massachusetts (Irish) , 
Col. Wm. INIonteith.— D. H] That he thought Savannnh would 
have to be taken by way of the Vernon Railroad. The siege 
artillery was arriving. He flattered McClellan by saying he had 
heard of his successes, and that in his opinion McClellan had about 
crushed the rebellion, and that Savannah and Charleston papers 
showed a deeply saddened spirit. 

We were mustered for pay on the 28th by our own Lieut. -Col. 
Jackson. 

Mr. Moore, a photographer from Concord, N. H., began taking 
pictures the 28th, in our regiment, principally in groups, among 
them being one of Lieuts. Maxwell, Emmons, Thompson (the Com- 





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XeliiLM^i 



FIRST CAMP /ir HILTON HEAD S.C. 



VEKr WEAI^LY AS REfll/I^ED BYTHt REGULATIONS. 



Feb. '62.^ 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMEXT. 



113 



missary), Adjt. Hill and Adjutant's Clerk Dodge. The bands (of 
the brigade) serenaded Col. Fellows, and he entertained them. 
After visiting several plantations the 28th, the Chaplain entered up 
this : "I find the negroes contented and happy. They can do little 
without a boss." 

On the 2.Sth, the troops of the Department were as follows : — 



ORGANIZATION OF THE EXPEDITIONARY CORPS. 
FIRST BRIGADE. 

Brig.-Gen. Egbert L. Viele at Daufnskie. 

Eighth Maine " Hilton Head. 

Third New Hampshire " " " 

Forty-sixth New Yorlv " Tybee. 

Forty-seventh New York " Edisto. 

Forty-eighth New York " Daufnskie. 

Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania " Hilton Head. 

SECOND BRIGADE. 

Brig.-Gen. Isaac I. Stevens at Beaufort 

Eighth Michigan " " 

Seventy-ninth New York " " 

Fiftieth Pennsylvania " " 

One Hundredth Pennsylvania " " 

THIRD BRIGADE. 

Brig.-Gen. Horatio G. Wright at Warsaw Sound. 

Sixth Connecticut " " " 

Seventh Connecticut " Tybee. 

Ninth Maine " Warsaw Sound. 

Fourth New Hampshire " " " 

Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania " " 

NOT BRIGADED. 

Twenty-eighth Massachusetts .... at Hilton Head. 

First New York Engineers " " " 

Forty-fifth Pennsylvania " Otter Island. 

Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania " Fort Welles. 

Third Rhode Island " 

First Massachusetts Cavalry " Hilton Head. 

First Connecticut Battery " Beaufort. 

Third U. S. Artillery, Battery E .... " Savannah River. 

Aggregate present and absent 19,028 

for duty 15,370 



114 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



\_Feh. '62. 



SUPPLENIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDER. 

Very generously indeed the War Department provided, 1 Feb. 
1862, that prisoners of war should receive same pay as if on active 
duty. 



The Department statistics for Februar}' are : Total troops, 
16,288; wounded and sick, 3,451 ; died, 34; hospital cases, 
wounded, etc., 121 ; died of wounds, etc., 2. 



The Monthly Return shows 



Field aud Staff 

Band . . . 

Co. A . . . 

B . . . 

C . . . 

D . . . 

E . . . 

F . . . 

G . . . 

H . . . 

I . . . 

K . . . 



Present aggregate . 
Aggregate last report 



officers. 



9G9 
982 



ABC 



Sergeants .... 
Corporals .... 
Absent sick .... 
Present sick . . . 
Discharged for disabili 
Died of disease . . 
Deserted .... 
Officers resigned . . 
Officers in arrest . . 
Officers detached . . 
Recruits reqnii'ed 



y u 



1 

1 

<) 1 



10 

10 1 



F G H I K Totals. 
5 5 5 5 5 

8 8 8 8 8 



110 11 

2 



1 







3 3 4 6 7 



U 6 13 14 



IVIARCH, 1862 




MENERAL inspection and review, to be held on the 3d at 
9.15 A.M., on the ground in our immediate front, was 
ordered by Col. Fellows. Commanding Post, on the 1st, 
K . the formation to be as follows: (Right) One section 
"'^ Hamilton's Battery ; two sections Third Rhode Island 
Battery, First Massachusetts Cavalry, Third New Hamp- 
shire, Eighth Maine, Twenty-eighth Massachusetts, New 
York Volunteer P^ngineers, Third Rhode Island, Seventy- 
sixth Pennsylvania, Sixth Connecticut (Left). 

Sergt. White of Co. A was detailed as clerk at Post Headquar- 
ters. Capt. Scull, Commissary of Subsistence, was appointed Bri- 
gade Connnissary on the 1st, and was directed to serve all the troops 
on the island except the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania and Third 
Rhode Island. 

On the 2d, Jeff Davis asked Lee to come at once to Richmond 
for conference. At our services on the 2d, after dress parade, fully 
half of Gen. Sherman's staff were present. We were reviewed by 
Col. Fellows. A diary says : " Saw three white women." 

Gen. Wright, on the 3d, with headquarters at St. Andrew's 
Sound, notified Col. Guss, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, that Fernau- 
dina was reported abandoned, and to change original plan and pro- 
ceed with only eight companies of his regiment, then on the steamer 
Boston, with a light draft' gunboat, through the inland passage, etc. 
On the 3d, Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, detailed four men 
to act as coxswains in express boats running between Hilton Head 
and Edisto, by way of Otter Island. The detail was Corporals Per- 
kins and Burke of D, Corporal Thomas of K, and Corporal Harris 
of E. 

On that date we find the first mention of men standing on barrels. 
This was a species of light punishment, resorted to by the officers 
for small offences, such as would in their opinion hardly be worth 
the trouble of bringing to trial by a general court-martial. There 
is nothing in the articles of war warranting such punishments ; but 
it was a practice apparently engrafted upon the army, and so firmly 
that in the opinion of the writer it will never be entirely discontinued. 
As an illustration we will suppose that two men have a sudden quar- 
rel, and one or both strike out from the shoulder, hitting somebody; 
and at once the quarrel stops because the cry is quickly raised, 
" Corporal of the Guard ! " or, if any non-com. is near bj', it is his 

(115) 



116 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3Iar. '62. 

duty to stop the light. To court-martial oue or both these meu may 
mean that one or both must be arrested and lie in the guard-house 
till charges and specifications can be formulated and forwarded and 
a general court-martial convened for the trial. This is not done 
generally until there are several cases for its consideration. It may 
be that the meu will actually be oft' duty (in arrest) for months 
before it is flnall}' decided what to do with them; i.e., what their 
sentence shall be. At that time they may be mulcted in the sum of 
one month's pay. Now all this time some oue else has had to do the 
duty which othenvise would have fallen to them. Excepting for 
higher crimes, the officers generally avoided court-martialing the 
men : and hence the practice of giving immediate punishment, and 
having the matter disposed of at once. The various forms taken are 
instructive and possibl}' amusing — some partook of the nature of 
cruelty. The barrel act was the most popular. An empty barrel 
was generally placed upon the parade ground of the company to which 
the oft'ender belonged, and he was required to stand upon its head 
for a specified length of time, during which he was guyed more or 
less by his comrades ; but this must be done covertly, as it was not 
permitted. To a person of any degree of personal pride, this was 
ample punishment. We had another barrel act at one time, soon after 
we landed at Hilton Head ; and this was owing to the surreptitious 
entry of whiskey into our camp, it being sold by the fellow who had 
the exclusive right to the particular barrel about to be described. Both 
heads were knocked out, and he was put into it, the barrel made to 
rest on his shoulders, while for epaulettes empty bottles were sus- 
pended on each side. The barrel had a placard front and rear : 
"This is the man who sold whiskey! " and he was marched around 
the camp to the tune of the " Rogue's March," having a file of 
soldiers with bayonets fixed, to see that he played his lines well. 
Another method was to require an offender to drill with his knapsack 
on ; another to march backward and forward within the company 
parade ground, with knapsack on, doing penance. In one of the 
more cruel forms, a log is procured, say six or eight feet long, 
sawed at one end so as to stand upon the ground, if poised. To 
this perpendicular log the oft'ender is lashed, being wound "round 
and round " from feet to neck, thus becoming as it were a part of 
the log itself ; and both could be easily pushed over by an infant. 
The offender while in this position must remain quiet, though he may 
suft'er untold agony, as he knows that any struggle will cause his fall 
and add to his pain. 

Another mode of punishment was termed ' ' bucking and gagging." 
From the standpoint of a peace basis and at this distance (1<S89) 
fi'om the war period, those words savor of the Inquisition. The 
"bucking" and the "gagging" maybe done separately; but they 
are very appropriate!}' linked together, as will be seen. This method 
was resorted to in cases of extreme violence, such as "fighting 
drunk " and otherwise in a condition of mind inducing beligerency, 
and where the offender absolutely requires binding to prevent injury 
to others. His hands are bound at the wrists, generally with the 



Mar. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 117 

palms together. The feet are then bound at the ankles, and the 
offender made to sit upon the ground, with his feet drawn well up to 
his body. Then his bound hands (arms) are passed over the up- 
turned knees, slipped downward sufficiently far to permit the placing 
of a rod or other device under the back of the knees, and thus passing 
over (above) the two elbows. This holds the offender in a perfectly 
helpless position, which he has no power to change, except that by a 
struggle he tips himself over sidewise, which does not add materially 
to his comfort ; and hence as a rule he does n't do it. This completes 
the bucking ; and now the reader will be shown why the gagging 
appropriately follows. During the process already described, — the 
officer ordering it usually standing by, — the offender, whose flow of 
language has heretofore been limited, now pours forth such a volley 
of the language of our country as fairly to astonish everyone within 
hearing. He even goes so far as to express his doubts as to whether 
his captor's maternal parent was a biped or a quadruped. He other- 
wise makes remarks, not only unpleasant to the ear, but entirely 
inelegant and not becoming to one of our own country's defenders. 
One thing he does n't say — and this rule is invariable: he doesn't 
repeat the ten commandments. For all this, or rather to bring his 
little dissertation to an end, he is "gagged" — in parliamentary 
language, the gag rule is applied. This usually consists of a hand- 
kerchief folded its longest way (corner-wise) and inserted in his 
unwilling mouth, and tied tightly around his head. He does n't talk 
any more — in fact, he does n't even express his desire to do so. He 
is silent. Sometimes a short stick, say six inches long, with strings 
upon the ends, is used for a gag. This is a little worse to wear than 
the handkerchief, as it binds the jaws open and rigid. This condition 
does not last a long time. Generally some one or more men are 
close at hand, to ask certain questions of the sufferer, as to Avhether 
he surrenders, as to whether he wants water and so on. He does n't 
generally remain bucked and gagged a long tims, except that he wills 
it himself. 

With a description of one more of the more cruel sort of sum- 
mary punishments, we will dismiss the subject, as such a recital 
cannot prove entertaining if continued too long. This process is 
called " tying up by the thumbs." Methinks the reader says, " More 
Inquisition ! " The refractory man is seized and his two thumbs tied 
together, palms facing, the tying point being at the small of the 
thumbs. The cord is then attached to some post, or tree — in fact, 
anything which is firm, and higher than the man would be with arms 
extended upward. The cord is drawn and the arms go upward until 
generally the victim's toes only touch the ground. It need not be 
said that this is a painful position, and the man soon gently intimates 
that he will (would) lay down his arms, if the opportunity should 
offer. Some men are built to bear pain, and will " grin and bear it" 
like heroes, for some time ; but the surrender comes sooner or later. 
In many cases the victim is only tied with arms extended to their 
fullest, and both feet remaining on terra Jirma. 



118 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. I31ar. '62. 

This is history ; and we hope there will be no further occasion 
to refer to the subject, which is a painful one. One cannot surely 
predict what he would do were he an officer and had refractory men. 
His responsibilities are great; and who can say that a degree of 
discipline obtained and retained through measures bordering upon 
severity may not have been justified, and that an opposite course, 
with its probable resulting lack of discipline, may not have been the 
direct cause of disaster and the loss of many lives. We dismiss the 
subject, and ask to be excused for devoting valuable space to it. 
The reader must, however, bear in mind that the writer has not stated 
that the cruel punishments described ever took place in the Third 
New Hampshire. These descriptions are given as simply within the 
writer's knowledge. 

We had the grand review on the 3d (ordered on the 1st), and 
also had a mail with cheering news from the West (Fort Donelson) . 

We laid away two more comrades on the 4th. During Lee's 
absence for consultation with Jeff Davis, Gen. Pembertou was in 
command, with headquarters at Pocotaligo. 

Co. E had so few men on the 4th for duty (the details being 
large) , that the few men left were attached to other companies dur- 
ing drill-. The liquor question, which was a very important one, was 
manfully fought at Headquarters ; but notwithstanding that, liquor 
was brought into the Department and sold and drank, with all that 
that implies. 

Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, in an order of the 4th, said he 
was informed that officers gave enlisted meu orders for liquor (offi- 
cers were entitled, but not the men) and forbade a continuance of 
the practice. We find Adjt. Hill was sick on the 5th, and Lieut. 
Emmons acted in his stead. Heavy details again on the 5th. Capt. 
Dunbar, with 90 men, went to the beach at 1 p.m. ; and at 1 .30 there 
were 200 more sent. The same day Gen. Sherman announced that 
the appointment of Mr. S. F. B. Barr as sutler to the Expeditionary 
Corps had been revoked by the Secretary of War, and that now we 
were entitled to a sutler to each regiment, under par. 214 of the 
Army Regulations. 

Gen. Wright reported, the 5th, his occupation of Amelia Island, 
without opposition, and that he found there 14 large calibre guns. 

Reader : Governor Milton of Florida. He objected, on the 5th, 
— to his Secretary of War, — to the evacuation of Florida to the 
mercy and abuse of the Lincoln government, and asked for an order 
to arm and equip 2,500 men in Florida, for service for the year, or 
for the war, if it be to the end of time. 

Capt. Dunbar was off again with a large detail on the Gth ; and 
on that day another of our boys was placed in his sandy tomb, the 
burial taking place in our new burying ground. [We did not call it 
"cemetery." — D. E.] This was to our right and rear, and was 
among trees, mostly oak, which lent shade and sadness, too. The 
regiment turned out, and the Chaplain gave us a short sermon 
specially adapted to the occasion. 



Mar. '62.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 119 

The same day McClellan suggested to Shermau, that a certain 
disposition of the troops be made during the unhealthy season, and 
that Fernandina be promptly occupied ; but not to disturb the plans 
for reducing Pulaski. 

The Major drilled us the 6th, and was also in command at dress 
parade. 

We were stirred greatly by two important events of the 7th : 
it snowed, — a few flakes only, — for the first time; and we were or- 
dered to move. But where? It soon developed that only Cos. A, 
C, D, E, F, G and K were to go ; so of course it's not much of an 
expedition, said the other companies. The day was devoted to get- 
ting read}^, so we had no dress parade or drill. At sundown we 
started, marching to Seabrook, and embarking there in boats, and 
proceeding in the general direction of Savannah. The night was 
dark, and it would appear that all our pickets had not been notified 
of this little movement, and hence, as we passed along the winding 
ways of Skull Creek, Ave were challenged and fired at and into. In- 
asmuch as the regiment was divided, — a part at the camp at Hilton 
Head, — and other collateral matters are to be introduced all along the 
line of our story, we deem it wise to follow, first, the items by 
date, and then sum up the movements of the expedition as a whole, 
by inserting Col. Jackson's report of it in full, which he rendered 
upon its return. 

Gen. Wright, on the 7th, directed Col. Whipple of the Fourth 
New Hampshire ((S companies) to proceed up to Jacksonville, and 
in conjunction with the navy, occupy it (but not permanently) , and 
destroy the batteries along the river. Gen. Wright also notified 
Sherman of the above, and said the McClellan would probably re- 
turn to Hilton Head next day with the marines (sent at request of 
flag officer) . Our seven companies were in the boats substantially 
all night, some getting lost or separated from the main body and put- 
ting into Spanish AYells and other points on Hilton Head. We col- 
lected ourselves together on Daufuskie Island next morning (8th) ; 
and after getting our breakfasts, we started across the island to re- 
port to Gen. Viele. 

At this point the writer divulges to the reader what we were go- 
ing to do. It appears that Gen. Viele had, as he thought, discov- 
ered the constructing of a rebel battery, which if completed might 
drive him (his batteries) from the Savannah River; and not wishing 
to disturb the force he had with him, owing to their locations at de- 
sirable points of vantage, had sent to Gen. Sherman for the Third 
New Hampshire to be sent him for special service. Our Chaplain, 
ever anxious to serve us, started from Hilton Head, the 8th, with a 
mail, which had arrived soon after our departure. He took it to 
Braddock's Point, from whence it was conveyed to Daufuskie by 
boat. We got it, as will be seen later on. Gen. Shermau reported 
to McClellan, the 8th, that Pulaski was completely cut olf , and no 
further preparations would be made toward the capture of Savannah. 
Said he was convinced that Charleston could be beleaguered in a 
very happy manner, without having to carry the forts near the mouth 



120 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Mar. '62. 



of the Stouo, nor indeed by turning them. Gunboats could go up 
the North Edisto and AYadmalaw Rivers, said he, and probably into 
the'Stono itself, which would bring our forces within five miles of 
Charleston. Point Pleasant, he said, could be attacked by way of 
Bulls Bay, and Moultrie be carried by a coup cle main. 

Gen. Wright at Fernandina reported, the 8th, that the McClel- 
lan had left there for Hilton Head that morning, and the expedition 
to Jacksonville started at 11.30 a. si. 

Sherman reported to the Adjutant-General at Washington, the 
8th, that he had received his request for 300 or 400 contrabands to 
be sent to Key West ; but found it impracticable to comply with 
promptitude, without incurring the risk of a panic, and that some of 
the negroes thought they were to be sent to Cuba into slavery. 



^- ^-.,v-^V 




-■live: OAKS — SOUTHERN MOSS, DAUFU8KIE ISLAND. 

That he was then waiting to hear from Edisto. Gen. Sherman also 
announced, the same day, the appointment, by the Secretary of the 
Treasury, of Mr. Edward L. Pierce (of Boston) as " General Super- 
intendent and Director of all persons engaged in the cultivation of 
the land and the employment of the blacks." 

The regimental report at (from) our camp at Hilton Head, the 
8th, showed 575 men and 20 officers absent. Capt. Dow in com- 
mand of camp. Capt. Dunbar had arrived (see Col. Jackson's re- 
port) , and the Adjutant was present. The Chaplain was also there, 
as he did not accompany the expedition. 

Our seven companies arrived before night at Gen. Viele's Head- 
quarters. Daufuskie was a beautiful island. We marched through 



Mar. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. ]21 

groves where the southern moss hung in masses from the trees. To 
see it does not give one the power to describe it. It was a most 
beautiful sight ; and that is all the writer will attempt to say. We 
bivouacked near Gen. Viele's Headquarters, which were in a large 
white house. We were on high land, overlooking the Savannah ; 
and in the far distance Pulaski's square battlements showed them- 
selves against the sky, while the navy rode at anchor still farther on. 
During the evening we got our mail, and the writer will never forget 
what arrived for him nor what associations it called up. 

On the morning of the 9th, soon after our morning meal, we 
were called into line and directed to load. To load! What for? 
AVhat's up? This was the first time we had ever been ordered, as a 
regiment, to load. Some of us loaded with more "times" and 
" motions" than were laid down in the tactics. Many of us were a 
little nervous, though of faltering there was none. We knew what 
we were there for, and where we were going. A\"e knew that Savan- 
nah was not afar off and that the city was a desirable one for us, 
and we would not have been surprised at all had we been told then 
and there that before the set of the sun we would be in Savannah 
or dead. We were soon put on board small boats and proceeded up 
the creek toward the Savannah. To saj^ we were not particularly 
hilarious just about that time would be strictly true. We only knew 
two facts : one, that our guns were loaded and we had 39 more rounds, 
and that we were going toward Savannah. Those were two "aw- 
fully solemn " facts, and we nursed them as such. We rowed to Bird 
Island, where we found the Forty-eighth New York were building 
batteries. A rebel gunboat came down from Savannah, but was 
driven back by a shell from one of our batteries (on an island). 
After looking around a little, we rowed back to Daufuskie ; and at 
that we were somewhat disappointed, though none expressed a wish 
to die or lose a leg. 

Next day (10th) we started again in the boats; but this time 
we were towed b}'^ the Mayjloioer, which took us nearly to the Savan- 
nah River. We then rowed to Elba Island on the Georgia side of 
the river, and landed (most of us) at our battery recently erected 
there. We returned at dark to Daufuskie. 

Under date of the 10th, Gen. Sherman wrote to Gen. Viele, 
substantially, that a late inspection of the works convinced him that 
not all the iiieasures were taken to avoid disagreeable things that 
should have been, and further that the 0. M. Petitt and Mayflower 
(two steamers) were doing but little; also that the New Hampshire 
Battalion [he meant the Third New Hampshire. — D. E.], under 
Lieut. -Col. Jackson, was sent him for a particular purpose, and that 
purpose should be accomplished in three days, if at all ; and expressed 
disappointment at the delay which had attended all of its (Third 
New Hampshire) movements. That same day the negro question 
was again forced upon Gen. Sherman, by letters from Gen. Wright, 
who asked as to their employment and their feeding. He further 
said the Ben Deford had arrived that morning with stores, and he 



122 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [il/ar. '62. 

had " now 40 days' rations." That the Boston was to return to Hil- 
ton Head, and he Avould then have with him only the Emjyire City, 
Belvidere and the George's Creek. 

Our regiment returned to Daufuskie. Much has been omitted 
because it appears in the report of Col. Jackson. The water of the 
Savannah River has a peculiarly yellowish appearance, but loses it 
upon being dipped up. We drank it, as we were far above tide 
water. 

We struck tents about noon next day (11th) and in a pouring 
rain started homeward, marching across the island again to where 
our boats lay. The tents mentioned were those kindly loaned to us 
through Gen. Viele. The island we found to be about five miles 
across. Bivouacked all night near where our boats lay. At our 
regimental camp, Hilton Head, there were several men discharged for 
disability during our absence. Capt. Wilbur's trial begun. 

We arrived at our camp before noon of the next day (12th), 
and in a rain, having with us two rebel prisoners sent by (with) us 
from Gen. Viele to Gen. Sherman. Mail. A part of the Fourth 
New Hampshire occupied Jacksonville on the 12th. 

Without at all desiring to weary the reader or to dose him with 
repetitions, we venture to insert another account of the 

SAVANNAH RIVER RECONNOISSANCE. 

On the 7th March, 1862, we were sent up to the Savannah River to re- 
connoitre. Gen. Viele, stationed at Dauf aside Island (east side of river), 
had reported to Gen. Sherman that he had good reason to believe the rebels 
were constructing batteries at certain points, and advised measures to stop 
them. Gen. Sherman selected the Third New Hampsliire for the important 
and dangerous undertaking of discovering the batteries and destroying them 
if found. We proceeded to the Savannah by march to Seabrook plantation 
(say six miles) and thence by lighters to Daufuskie Island. Our route lay 
through the crooked channels of Skull Creek. The night being very dark 
and the route unknown to most of us, several boats got lost and were 
obliged to put into the various points on Hilton Head till next morning. 
The plan was for the boats to follow each other, keeping near enough to see 
the preceding boat or hear the dip of the oars ; but some boats had better 
rowers than others, and the plan did not work successfully. As the coun- 
tersign was not known in each boat, we had to run the gauntlet when chal- 
lenged by our pickets on Hilton Head, stationed at intervals along Skull 
Creek. Several shots were fired at us; but no one was hurt, although one 
bullet struck an oar and glanced upward and over the head of a rower. A 
high wind arose in the night, and this caused still further separation. 

A part of this boat Heet put into Spanish Wells till morning, when a 
considerable part of the regiment concentrated and landed upon Daufuskie 
Island, and marched across it, say seven miles, to the end nearest Savan- 
nah, and in sight of that city and also of Fort Pulaski. At this point we 
found several regiments (the force of Gen. Viele) encamped there. On our 
march across the island we did not fail to observe the beauties of nature. 
A grove was passed through where the trees were hung with a natural 
draping of moss, reaching the ground. This moss, when boiled, makes a 
good material for filling beds and is often sold for curled hair, though the 
difterence in value is about as five is to fifty. 

A long narrow field we passed, seemingly about two miles long, had 
"broom grass" growing almost its entire length. This field resembled 
a field of grain, ready for the sickle. This species of grass was used con- 
siderably by the soldiers in their tents. Deer and other game was said to 



3Iar. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 123 

abound on this island. Tlie men who preceded us exhibited several skins 
of alligators, trophies of their valor. We bivouacked at this point and 
rested till the following day, when we were ordered to embark In lighters 
for some unknown point. 

Prior to taking the boats we were ordered to load, and for the first 
time since our entry into service it really looked like fighting. The boats 
were taken in tow by the Mayflotrer, a small river steamer, and towed up 
the winding creek in the direction of Savannah. A landing was made 
on Mud Island, on the side opposite to that on the Savannah River bank. 
On this island had been erected by our forces a battery, close to the Savan- 
nah River bank, to prevent the rebels from reinforcing Fort Pulaski. A 
similar battery had been erected on the opposite shore on an island (Georgia 
side), and for the same purpose. These islands are nothing but marsh, and 
the soil therefore very miry. The only way to do any work on them was to 
lay down canvas, then wood, then boards, then planks lastly, to roll or drag 
guns upon. All of this work had to be done in the night, until one or two 
guns had been mounted. We marched across the island to the Savannah 
River bank — bad marching it was, too, for each man had to pick his way. 
After surveying the scenery awhile, we were ordered back to Daufuskie. 
It appeared afterward that we were not expected to do anything that day 
except to look about 

Soon after arriving back at Daufuskie we got a sharp shower and a 
mail. The latter contained a letter from a loving sister, enclosing, with the 
good advice only a sister can give, a small parcel of tea. These she sent 
often ; and in many instances one reached me when far away from camp, 
while on the march, and even on the battle-field. After reading the letter 
by the dim light of the short piece of candle which I carried in my pocket, 
I lay doAvn upon my bed of earth and pillow of boughs to dream of home, 
sweet home, whose pleasures and comforts I might never again enjoy — as 
the morroAv might end my earthly career ; for we all supposed that the mor- 
row would see us in Savannah or numbered among the dead. 

Embarked again next day, and proceeded in same direction as on pre- 
vious day, and rowed till we found ourselves in the Savannah River and 
above our batteries ; but we had Ijeen discovered by the rebels, Avho sent 
down a gunboat to ascertain our business. Before it got within range of us 
we had reached the friendly cover of our batteries, which then opened fire 
on the gunboat with such accuracy that it was forced to retire. We after- 
ward visited the battery on the opposite (Georgia) side of the river; and as 
the stars and stripes had never been raised on Georgia soil since its secession, 
we planted our flag on the parapet of the mud fort, amid the cheers and huz- 
zas of all present. This mud fort was composed first of sand bags from 
neighboring sandy isles, and the clayey mud of the island piled upon the 
bags. The latter, upon drying in the sun, becomes nearly as hard as brick. 

After a brief stay here, we took to our boats again and rowed up the 
river toward Savannah. The water of this river is of a yellowish, muddy 
brown ; but upon being dipped up to drink, it lost that appearance and proved 
quite palatable. The force at the batteries described had no other water. 
This place, where the reader finds us, was above Fort Pulaski — considerably 
so. We rowed our boats near the river bank (Georgia side), under cover of 
the tall marsh grass, so that we could not be seen from Savannah or the outer 
picket posts. Our course Avas toward Savannah, but could not continue 
long. We stopped at Elba Island and lay there ready for action, while Lieut. - 
Col. Jackson and Major Bedel, each with a few picked men, landed and went 
forward to reconnoitre. After an absence of nearly an hour, they returned 
with the report that they had been near enough to the rebel pickets to see 
them and to hear their conversation. We then returned to Daufuskie and, 
marching across it, took our boats back to Hilton Head, and to our old 
camp, without the expected fight. 



124 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3/a?-. '62. 

RECONNOISSANCE UP SAVANNAH RIVER AND TO 
ELBA ISLAND. 

repokt of lieut. -col. john it. jackson. 

Headquarters Third Regiment N.H. Vols., 

Tort Royal, S.C, 13 March 1862. 

I have the honor to report that in compliance witli instructions received 
from Brig. -Gen. T. W. Sherman, March 7, I left this camp at p.:\i. on that 
date, and proceeded to Seabrook, vsitli 20 officers and 371 men, "vvith Surg. 
Moulton and four hospital attendants. I arrived at Seabrook at s p.m. and 
found there six boats, two of them of small size. I made every effort to 
obtain more boats, and after w-aiting an hour, Capt. Dunbar arrived from 
Hilton Head with four boats, making ten boats with which to transfer my 
command to Dauf uskie. The boats were crowded full, and I was compelled 
to leave behind Company A, with two officers, and a part of Company F, 
with one officer : a total of 91 men and two officers. Just as we were about 
to leave Seabrook, Capt. Dunbar was taken sick, and I placed the whole 
charge of the boats and boatmen with Lieut. Cornelius of Co. D, who dis- 
charged his duties in a prompt and efficient manner during the whole time 
of our absence. We left Seabrook at 10 p.m., some of the boats leaking 
badly. When I arrived opposite Buckingham's Ferry, and several times 
before reaching there, I was fired on by rebel pickets. I found Ave had lost 
our way, and having no countersign, were being fired on by our own pickets, 
as well as by the rebels. I thought it advisable to land and wait till day- 
light, it then being very dark, (^uite a number of shots were fired at us, 
none hitting either the men or boats. 

It Avas two in the morning when I landed, tAvo of the boats not coming 
up till daylight, having lost their Avay during the night. At daylight I 
started again, having procured a guide — PriA'ate Alouzo Borden, Co. I, 
Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers. At 7.30 a.m. Ave came up with the 
tAvo boats we had missed during the night, and at 1) a.ai. I landed at Dau- 
fuskie, marched five miles to Gen. Viele's quarters, and reported to him at 
12 o'clock. After landing, I sent the boats to Engineer's Wharf, at upper end 
of the island. Gen. Viele ordered me to encamp and Avait further orders. 
During the evening Cos. A and F arrived from Seabrook on the 3Iayflowe)\ 
she 'coming from Hilton Head with commissary stores, and having taken 
them on board Avhen passing Seabrook. 

The next morning (Sunday, the 9th) I Avas ordered to embark and 
proceed to Savannah River, Avitli my command, on a reconnoissance. I pro- 
ceeded to SaA'annah River, and some distance up the river, Avithout seeing 
any signs of rebel pickets. I then returned and landed at the battery oppo- 
site Jones Island, letting the men leave the boats a short time to rest them. 
While there a rebel steamer came out of St. Augustine Creek in sight of our 
batteries, and steamed up the river toAvards Savannah. Our batteries opened 
on them, making some good line shots, though they did not appear to strike 
the steamer ; but they quickened her speed. After resting a short time I 
crossed to Jones Island. As the boats Avere heavily laden and the tide low, 
I could not pass doAvn Mud River. I therefore landed the men and sent the 
boats around to the opposite side of the island to join me there. From there 
I again embarked and returned to Daufuskie. 

The next morning (Monday, 10th) I received orders from Gen. Viele to 
take one day's rations and, Avith all my command, make a reconnoissance of 
Elba Island ; and I proceeded to do so, accompanied by Maj. Gardiner of the 
Seventh Connecticut Volunteers, and Capt. Liebenau of Gen. Viele's staff. 
We left the landing knoAvn as the Engineer's Wharf at 9.45 a.ai., in small 
boats, Avhich Avere taken in tOAV by the steamer Mwjfloroer to the point of 
Jones Island (on Mud River) knoAvn as Sears' Landing, arriving there at 12 
o'clock. From thence Ave proceeded in our boats, heavily laden as they 
were, against Avind and tide, through Mud River, across the Savannah River, 
to a point on Elba Island opposite to and beloAV the mouth of Mud River, 



Mar. '62.} THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 125 



where I lauded, accompanied by Maj. Bedel of the Third New Hampshire 
Volunteers, Maj. Gardiner, and Captain Liebenau. I at once saw the im- 
practicability of landing my whole force, as the tall reeds and grass on the 
lower portion of the island had been burned, thus leaving us a fair mark for 
any of the enemy's steamers, should any of them (attracted by the large force 
under my command, in small boats, crossing the Savannah in daylight) 
have thought best to come down and attack us. I left the force there under 
the command of Capt. Plimpton, with instructions to the officers in command 
of the several ditterent boats to allow no man to land, but each officer and 
soldier to remain seated in the boats, covered by the shores of the island, 
and instructing the officers in charge, as soon as any black, heavy smoke 
became visible beyond them, to pull directly for i\Iud River, so as to be 
under the cover of our guns from our batteries and those of the Western 
World ; to leave a small boat for us, or if this was not practicable, to take 
all the boats, leaving us on the island. 

After these instructions I divided our small force landed, by giving Maj. 
Bedel six men, and instructions to proceed across to the opposite side of the 
island, scattering his men, and thence to the upper end; while with Maj. 
Gardiner, Capt. Liebenau and six men, I proceeded on my course on this 
side, expecting to join Maj. Bedel at the upper end of the island. We sepa- 
rated to start upon our several courses at Ho p.m., and after travelling two 
hours and a quarter, and crossing several small streams, we carae to a point 
of land, the extreme end of the island, looking towards the mouth of Wright 
River. On a point of land above the mouth of said river we saw a large 
store-house, or factory, with the windows closed and no sign of any picket, 
although two men were seen, apparently unarmed. 

Fi'om this point we proceeded directly across the island to the opposite 
side. Here we found the ruins of two houses, with one high brick chinmey 
standing. From this point we could look directly up a stream, across which 
there seemed to be a bridge, with heavy, strong abutments, as if intended 
for guns to be placed upon. Upon these abutments men could be distinctly 
seen at work : but what they were doing, or if guns were in position at this 
place, Ave Avere unable to see. as tlie afternoon sun shone directly against us 
and, shining upon the water, impaired our view. Near the bridge, on the 
side towards us. there were three steamers lying at anchor (these Avere 
black), and one Avhite steamer under Avay inside of the bridge. On the right- 
hand side Avere tAvo vessels, schooner rigged. It Avas impossible to tell 
Avhether they Avere steamers or sailing vessels. I then proceeded to the 
above mentioned chimney, from Avhich point I plainly saAV houses, appearing 
to be store-houses, apparently filled Avith men, some of whom were distinctly 
seen lounging in the AvindoAvs ; but could see no signs of a battery. While 
resting ourselves, aa'C saAV a sail-boat Avell filled with men — some sailors and 
some soldiers, about 20 in all — leave one of the steamers and shape their 
course for this point. We at once proceeded to return to our boats. After 
a fatiguing tramp of one hour and a half, one of the corporals who accom- 
panied us saAV a sail passing doAvn the river. He reported the fact to me. 
We then ascertained that it Avas a boat from the Steamer Western World, 
Avith Capt. Gregory and Surg. Moulton of the Ncav Hampshire Third, Avho 
were in search of us along shore, thinking from our protracted absence Ave 
had lost our Avay. The captain immediately took us on board, and Ave pro- 
ceeded to join the force of my command, lying in boats at the loAver end of 
the island. 

On arriving there we found Maj. Bedel returned with the men of his 
command and four of those of mine. He reports that after crossing the 
island and proceeding up the southerly side opposite St. Augustine Creek 
(on the upper point of which he discovered a picket of five men), they Avere 
Avithin range; but his instructions Avere not to fire upon any pickets, but to 
keep themseh'es hidden. After travelling an hour and a half he found a 
stream, Avhich it was impossible to cross. He followed the course of the 
stream inland until he reached the head of the stream, where he lost his 
Avay, OAving to the thickness and height of the rushes; AA'hen, finding CA^e- 
ning approaching, he returned to the boats. Upon my joining the forces 
in the boats, we proceeded to camp, where we arrived at 8 o'clock p.m. 



126 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Mar. '62. 

The next morning (Tnesday, llth) I received orders from Gen. Viele 
to prepare to return to Hilton Head, witli tlie understanding tliat the May- 
flower was to bring the troops and tow the boats. Between 8 and 4 o'clock 
P.M., and after the men had been standing in the rain some time, we were 
notified that we must return in our boats ; and as it was impossible to get 
all the men in the boats, I sent the boats around to the point (Egg Point), 
where we first landed on the island, and marched the men down there. It 
was dark when we arrived there, and the tide running out and a strong 
head wind bloAving. I found it impossible to get home that night. I then 
took two companies across the river to Lawton's Plantation, on Hilton 
Head Island, and sent the boats back to join the other boats. I left Maj. 
Bedel with the remaining four companies, with instructions to return to 
Hilton Head as soon as practicable. The next morning, early, Maj. Bedel 
landed with two companies at Lawton's Plantation. The remaining two 
companies went to Seabrook in the ])oats, and marched from there to this 
camp yesterday noon. Between !» and 10 o'clock a.m. I left the plantation, 
with the four companies there, and arrived here in camp at 1 p.m. 

Every man that left the camp with me has returned. Five men are 
sick and in their quarters, and I was sent to the hospital on our return. 
The remainder of the men are in good health and spirits. 

With great respect, this report is respectfully submitted. 

JoHX H. Jackson, 
Lieut. -Colonel, Commanding Third N. II. Volunteers. 
To Commanding Officer, 

Port Royal, S. C. 

Gen. Wright reported to Sherman, on the 13th, that he had not 
as yet interfered with the rights of the owners of slaves whom he 
found there, or have since come into the lines, but had permitted no 
slave to be taken out of the lines on any pretext whatever. [Gen. 
Sherman approved this on the 15th. — D. E.] 

Capt. Carlton of Co. I, who was in poor health, obtained a 
sixty days' leave, on the 14th, in consequence of it. 

We will now relate something of great historical value, and from 
it several inferences may be drawn. On the 14th, Col. Edward W. 
Serrell (of the New York Engineers), being then at Willard's Hotel, 
Washington, D. C, on a leave of absence, made a report to the 
Secretary of War, in accordance with verbal orders, as to the condi- 
tion of matters in progress against Pulaski and Savannah, substan- 
tially as follows : After stating the condition, he recommended, 
among other things, an intelligent, vigorous and energetic general, 
in whom the entire army would have entire confidence ; who would 
council with his principal officers and act promptly in any decision 
he might form ; and who, having orders, would concentrate his ef- 
forts on some particular object and accomplish it. There should, 
said he, be harmonious action between the land and naval forces. 
There should be four or five reliefs : and, when ready, shell Pulaski 
day and night incessantly, allowing no time for the rebels to eat, 
drink or sleep till they surrendered. (As a matter of fact, which 
possibly the reader may say the writer has no business to go into, 
the Pulaski preparations were at that moment all as was desired by 
Col. Serrell in his report.) Coupled with the above, it must be re- 
membered that in January last past, Gen. Sherman had, against all 
precedent, yet with the good of the service undoubtedly at heart, 
appointed Capt. Gillmore over Col. Serrell, by making or attempting 



Mar. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 127 

to make him a brigadier-general, and actually placing him in com- 
mand over all the Engineers in the Department. Again, connect 
another fact with this group, that, the very next day after Col. Ser- 
rell made his report, the edict went forth from Washington relieving 
Gen. Sherman. This group of facts being given, we will proceed to 
the history proper. 

On the 14th, a regimental order, by Lieut. -Col. Jackson, changed 
the hours for daily calls, so that dress parade should be at five in the 
afternoon. The same day. Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, ordered 
that all empty pork and beef barrels with two heads be at once 
turned over to the quartermaster of the Volunteer Engineers. These 
were for buoying purposes in connection with the landing of guns at 
Tybee. 

The 15th of March was the date of the order for Sherman's re- 
moval, for it cannot properly be called by any other name. The 
order did n't arrive for several days. The order was as follows : — 

General Order 26, Washington, etc. The States of South Carolina, 
Georgia and Florida, with the expedition and forces now under Brig. -Gen. 
T. W. Sherman, will constitute a military department to be called the De- 
partment of the South, to be commanded by Maj.-Gen. Hunter. 
By order Secretary of War, 

L. Thomas, Adjutant-General. 

Short, but lacking in sweetness. It did n't even go through 
the usual form of saying that Sherman will be relieved by Hunter, or 
that Hunter will relieve Sherman. Does one wonder that Sherman 
was grieved upon its receipt? Though the purpose of this history is 
not to defend generals ; yet it seems appropriate that at this point 
we may properly pause and think compassionatelj^ toward Gen. Sher- 
man, now dead. Let it pass now. The same day Gen. Sherman 
reported to McClellan, by the Atlantic., that he was in a hurry for 
ordnance stores for Tybee. 

Capt. Carlton, on the same day, turned over his company (I) 
and its property to 1st Lieut. Emmons, preparatory to going North 
on his leave. And here we will explain what "turning over" 
means. An officer in command of a company, whatever his rank, 
is responsible for the company property (really the property of our 
dear Uncle Samuel), consisting, first, of guns, equipments, ammu- 
nition. First Sergeant's sword and sash — these are called " ordnance 
and ordnance stores ;" secondly, of tents, haversacks, canteens, knap- 
sacks, mess pans, camp kettles, hatchets, shovels and the like — 
these are called " camp and garrison equipage." The ordnance and 
ordnance stores have to be "returned" (?'. e., reported) quarterly 
to the Chief-of-Ordnauce at Washington, and whenever the officer in 
charge is relieved by another. The "return" specifies what was on 
hand at last return ; what received during the quarter (or fractional 
part of term) and whom from, and date ; what has been expended, 
or condemned, or lost, or turned over to any other officer ; and what 
remains on hand at end of the quarter. The process is the same for 
camp and garrison equipage, save that that is a monthly return in- 
stead of quarterly', and to the Quartermaster-General. Each kind 



128 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IMar. '62. 

must be specified in both cases. In Capt. Carlton's case, the turn- 
ing over of the company meant that he was relieved from the com- 
mand of it and another otiicer assigned to its command, to whom he 
must turn over the property ; and also make his own returns to the 
government, showing that he had disposed of all the property he was 
responsible for. He went North entirely relieved of responsibility, 
as well as command. Before he was actually relieved from the re- 
sponsibility of the property, the "returns" have to be passed 
through the Auditor's office at Washington, and a certificate sent 
him to that effect. This latter he files with his retained copy, for 
his own protection and information. The blanks for "returns" are 
furnished by the government and are very elaborate. 

The New South made its bow to the public (i. e., the troops) 
on the 15th March. This was a small newspaper, mostly of military 
news, principally of the Department, an epitome of every important 
movement in other Departments, and local gossip. The publisher 
and proprietor was Joseph H. Sears, who was for a considerable 
time postmaster at Hilton Head. The Third New Hampshire had a 
hand in its start ; for several Co. A men who had been printers at 
home were invited to assist in setting up the matter, etc. The little 
paper was well received and had a large circulation. Large numbers 
of them were sent home by the officers and men as souvenirs. The 
writer met Mr. Sears in Boston in 1888. 

Some of the First Massachusetts Cavalry arrived on the 16th, 
and we had a mail and an inspection. The rebel general (Trapier) 
at Charleston sent large reinforcements to Tennessee on that day. 
Gen. Sherman reported, the 16th, that Gen. Wright had taken 
Amelia Island and Jacksonville, and that Fort Marion (St. Augus- 
tine) had surrendered to the navy. 

St. Patrick's day (17th) arrived, and with it the usual recogni- 
tion ; for we had a large number of sons of the Emerald Isle, and 
the others freely united to make it an agreeable occasion. Our 
band played appropriate music in front of the Colonel's tent while 
the regiment paraded there, and also serenaded Capt. Donohoe. A 
squad worked on our new graveyard under Capt. Randlett. 

We had orders on the 18th to be ready to move on the morrow ; 
but the order was silent as to where we were to go. A letter gives 
the information. It said: "Tomorrow nine companies, including 
mine (B), are to start on a reconnoitring expedition, to be gone 
anywhere from three to ten days. One company (and that was K, 
the writer's company), will be left to guard the camp. We are to 
go via Seabrook." Maj. Bedel had charge that day of the battalion 
drill. 

The same day, also, the Inspector-General of Georgia (rebel) 
was informed that Gen. Pembertou approved a proposition to 
call out the militia to protect the invaded parts of the State ; but 
before inaugurating a system of guerilla warfare, the removal of 
women and children was recommended. 

We were up bright and early on the 19th, completing the "get- 
ting ready" process. Co. D started early in the forenoon, but the 




(A) J05IAHA.LADD (B) CHAS.FOG& Cot DIED DEC 6 1862 (C)W.FKIMBALL CpG- DIED Mfll/lS l«6Z (D) PATRICK SHEA 0»F PIED Noy Z 1861 

(£) JAMES P. PRESCOTT CoK DIED OCT 13 1&6Z (F; J.BMiWLL OF OIE.D OCT Z^ \8€2 (G) HENRY WALKER LIEUT. S.C.V. CHAS. BATLN. 0(£0Jm4 '861 

W STEPHEN HUBBAKD GK DIED JULY 9 IS62 (I) WARREN K/VOWLTfl/V G,]) DIED MAi^ 27 18^ (K) J5HW H.CLE.MENT DiEO DLC 3 IS6I 



3Iar. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 129 

other eight companies did not go till about 2 o'clock. Co. K was left 
to care for the camp and property, thongh a few of its men went 
with the regiment as volunteers, attaching themselves temporarily to 
other companies. A few of the band also accompanied, it being 
understood that the party was not liable to go to Charleston nor 
suffer very much while away : They were J. A. Dadmun, G. L. 
Lovejoy, C. E. Burnham, D. A. Brown and H. S. Hamilton 
(bugler). The destination was Bluffton, a small village "on de 
main." The regiment took boats at Seabrook, and after rowing a 
long time and in the night, and also in the rain, they landed at 
Pope's Plantation, Hilton Head, remaining there till next morning. 
A diary shows that the Chaplain and Doctor Moulton were there. 

Gov. Milton of Florida very kindly suggested that day to his 
Secretary of War, that Gen. Trapier's official acts did not meet with 
his approval, and closed his complaint by offering to take command 
of the Confederate forces in the State himself, for a few weeks. 
Gen. Trapier recommended the same day, to his Secretary of War, 
that bands of guerrillas be raised and thoroughly armed and 
equipped, for purpose of holding the interior of the State. Gen. 
Trapier was relieved that day, and ordered to report to Gen. A. S. 
Johnston at Decatur, Ala. ; and Col. Dilworth was temporarily 
assigned to command of Florida. 

The President approved a bill on the l!)th providing for sutlers. 
How thoughtful in him ! 

Very early on the morning of the 20th, the regiment took to its 
boats again, and rowed toward its destination, reaching BlutTton not 
long after daylight. Cos. A and F landed on the main land, some 
of the other companies going farther up May River (inland), while 
Co. F landed and captured four rebel pickets. We had with us 
some boat howitzers from the navy, and treated the rebels to a few 
gratuitous specimen shells. 

A diary says: "The rebel pickets ran without firing. The six 
companies went up to some houses and sent out two companies as 
skirmishers. Co. E Avent around to co-operate with Co. F, Capt. 
Raudlett (the two companies were A and E) . Co. E headed off 
the rebel pickets and captured them. We had a 12-pounder 
howitzer. Got it ashore and fired three shells." 

The diary of one who did not accompany the expedition says : 
"Sixth Connecticut ordered off last night. Hazeltine's body taken 
"P-" 

This latter item is of interest. Hazeltine (originally of K) was 
the drummer of Co. G when alive. His father sent out a metallic 
casket, and the body was exhumed and sent home in it. The writer 
assisted largely in the exhuming, and was the principal correspon- 
dent with the grief-stricken parents. 

To return to the regiment. Rain set in again, but the spirits 
of the men were superior to rain. They had taken four prisoners, 
and that was glory enough for oue day at least. The regiment 
then went to Bull Island, where they remained all night, stopping at 
Gen. Seabrook's plantation. The name Seabrook is quite common in 



130 THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. [J)/ar. '6l>. 

this vicinity ; but when the name Seabrook is mentioned without 
qualification, a Third New Hampshire man will at once determine 
that it refers to a plantation on Hilton Head Island, inland side, 
bordering on Skull Creek, as that is the one he is most familiar 
with. There were Seabrook plantations, — several of them, — and 
there was a Seabrook Island, too. 

Let us see what other events of importance occurred that day 
near us. Gen. Trapier (not yet relieved) reported that by his 
orders eight steam saw-mills and large quantities of sawed lumber 
had been burned near Jacksonville, to prevent falling into hands of 
enemy ; also an iron foundry and work shops owned by a Mr. 
Mooney, and a gunboat being built for the rebel government. The 
people of Jacksonville assembled that day at 10.30 a.m., and 
organized and passed resolutions of loyalty and a desire for forma- 
tion of a new State government, and asked the protection of the 
military. Union forces then there : Fourth New Hampshire. The 
resolutions were signed by C. L. Robinson, Chairman ; O. L. Keene, 
Secretary, and by Philip Frazer as Chairman of the Connnittee on 
Resolutions. Gen. Sherman issued a proclamation on that day to 
the people of East Florida, and it was dated Jacksonville : so it is 
fair to assume he was there personally that day. 

The- 21st found the regiment on hand for another adventure. 
In the early morning they saw the Kirk plantation houses, Bluffton, 
about 20 in all, on fire, having been fired by the rebels. The 
Chaplain was sent to Daufuskie with dispatches to Gen. Yiele, 
being conveyed there, some 15 miles distant, in a row-boat, and 
having Cyrus (our Lieut.-Colonel'y colored servant — a native) as his 
guide. The regiment went to Savage Island, and were shot at nine 
times going and four times on the return trip by the rebel pickets. 

The boys found on Savage Island hogs, sheep and cattle. Did 
they wickedly convert the flesh of those critters to their own use ? 
Several diaries say they did ; and we have no desire to enter into 
any controversy about the matter. They probably found an egg or 
two ; but what matters it ? 

Co. F was left with the boats that day, after we had approached 
the island in line of battle and lauded without opposition. After 
securing the bodies of the slain (captured pigs, etc.), the boys 
returned to Bull Island for the night. 

On the 21st, too, at Hilton Head, Col. Fellows, Commanding 
Post, issued an order, directing Provost Marshal Van Brunt to 
notify all parties selling liquor at the Post that hereafter they were 
forbidden to sell to any officer, soldier, employee of the government 
or negro, without a written permit signed by the Commandant of 
the Post. The order was promulgated by the Provost Marshal, 
and in his order he added " sailors" to the list, and said the penalty 
of violation would be confiscation of entire stock. 

Gen. Pemberton, on the 21st, at Pocotaligo, informed Gen. 
Ripley that the enemy was preparing to cross "Wall's Cut, with 
evident intent to make a feint from Jehossee on mainland. [This 
latter referred to troops at Edisto. — D. E.] 



Mar. '62.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 131 

On the 22cl we were up with the lark, and again went on the 
mainland and to Bluffton, and drove out the rebels, who fired on us 
as we landed. We chased them for half a mile into the woods, 
where we met them and had a little sharp firing, they retreating. 
The day's doings resulted in a deal of plunder, of such a varied 
nature and value that no attempt will be made to enumerat-e. Our 
approach to Bluffton (one diar}' calls it a city) that day was by 
skirmishing up to it by three companies and, when quite near, 
charging in line somewhat extended, as it was quite definitely known 
that the force to oppose was small : an old negro said 200 cavalry 
and 100 infantry. The boys were again covered with glory and 
laden with plunder. For our protection, we had one howitzer with 
us and another remained with the boats. Got back to Bull Island 
about '.) at night. 

That day Maj. Bedel, commanding the camp at Hilton Head, 
issued an order (numbered eleven) about the filing and indexing of 
orders received. By a singular coincidence, Col. Fellows, com- 
manding the Post, issued an order that day of the same number 
(11), announcing the arrival of the Lieut. -Colonel of the Forty-fifth 
Pennsylvania, and directing him to take command of the (his) 
regiment, then at Hilton Head. 

The Secretary of the Treasury on the same day said to the 
Secretary of War that Mr. Pierce, the special agent at Port Royal, 
had reported his inability to cultivate, etc., as the army had taken 
all the horses, and he (Secretary of Treasury) suggested sending 
90 mules and 10 horses at once to Special Agent Pierce. 

The adventures thus far of the regiment had been of such an 
elating nature that each succeeding day the men were brighter and 
more full of life. 

The morning of the 23d was Sunday; but we were on hand. 
We had a short sermon and prayer by the Chaplain, after which we 
went to slaying again, while the Chaplain again went to Daufuskie 
with dispatches. Co. F went after cattle, and shot eleven, besides 
calves, pigs, etc. The tide left the boats high and dry, and they 
had to wait till night. Some anxiet}' Avas felt for their safety. 

The rebel Secretary of War informed Gen. Pemberton that day 
that the Steamer Florida had arrived with 64,000 lbs. powder, and 
arms : the latter for Louisiana. The parties bringing in the powder 
wanted S2.00 per pound for it, and he had directed it to be im- 
pressed (seized). To that Gen. Pemberton assented by directing 
Col. Walker to proceed to Columbus, Ga., and impress the powder, 
and test its quality and report. 

Bull Island was again our quarters for the night of the 23d. 
On the 24th, apparently having fulfilled our "mission," we returned 
to our camp at Hilton Head, being towed down by the Ben Deford, 
and arriving at our camp about 7 in the evening. It is related, 
though not vouched for, that on the last day Gen. Viele chanced to 
be in the vicinity of Bull Island ; and, seeing us in our grey (our 
old) uniforms, thought we were rebels, and at once sent a courier 
post haste to Hilton Head with an order for the Third New Hump- 



132 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3Iar. '62. 

shire to come right tip there ! Mail. Ou our arrival at camp, there 
was the liveliest kind of a lively time till past midnight. Those 
who did not go insisted upon having the adventures of those who 
did go repeated o'er and o'er ; and the latter were willing, no doubt. 
Having arrived home, our Lieutenant-Colonel made his official 
report ; and for purpose of further information, it is inserted in full. 



OPERATIONS NEAR BLUFFTON, S. C. 

REPORT OF LIEUT. -COL. JOHN H. JACKSON. 

Headquarters Third New Hampshire Vols., 
Hilton Head, S. C, 2.5 March 18G2. 

Sir : I have the honor to report that, in compliance with Special Order 

No. 67, 18 March 1862, I proceeded on the 19th, with 24 officers and 

enlisted men, on a reconnoissance in force on May River, running between 
the islands of BnU and Savage, and the mainland. Accompanying the bat- 
talion from my regiment was a detachment from the Third Rhode Island 
Volunteers, with a 12-pounder howitzer, under the command of Lieut. 
Morrow, who conducted himself in a manner deserving my thanks and 
materially .assisted me in all my movements during the five days I was 
gone. 

I left my camp at this place at 2 p.m., and arrived at Seabrook at 3.30 
P.M., and all but one company embarked at 4 o'clock, filling what boats I 
had — fifteen in number, one leaking so badly I had to leave it behind. The 
field-piece I embarked in a scow we found at Seabrook. and towed it with 
one of our large boats. Soon after leaving the wharf it began to look dark 
and to rain, and the wind blew hard, so as to endanger the safety of our 
field-piece, the scow being low in the Avater. After an hour and a half's 
rowing, I thought best to land a short time until the weather became some- 
what calmer, and landed at Dr. Frank Pope's plantation, on Hilton Head 
Island. The men found shelter in the buildings; and at 2.30 o'clock in the 
morning, Thursday the 20th, we again embarked, and about daybreak 
landed on a hard beach at Dr. James Kirk's plantation, on the mainland and 
one mile from Bluflton. 

I had previously sent two companies, under command of Capt. 
Randlett, to the White House, on Ephraim Baynard's plantation, opposite 
the lower end of Pinckney Island, to drive in or capture the picket stationed 
there. Immediately after landing the command remaining with me, I 
threw out Capt. Plimpton's company as skirmishers in the direction of the 
above plantation, to assist Captain Randlett and to ascertain what other 
pickets there were near there, and, if possible, to capture them. 

Immediately after landing we could see cavalry pickets in the woods 
skirting the plantation. I immediately had the field-piece brought up, and 
fired three shells into the woods, scattering the enemy. As I had not made 
preparation to advance far into the interior, I drew oft' my command, and 
dropped down to Col. Seabrook's wharf and plantation on Bull Island, 
opposite the mainland. 

After landing that portion of my command, I proceeded to Baynard's 
plantation, and found that four rebel pickets hacl been captured. Capt. 
Plimpton's company, under command of Lieut. Ela, had cut oft' their retreat; 
and, being hemmed in on all sides, they surrendered without resistance. 
On arriving, I disarmed them of their rifles and long knives, with which 
they were armed, and carried them to Buckingham's Perry, Hilton Head 
Island, and delivered them over to an officer of the Forty-fifth Pennsylvania 
Volunteers, commanding the picket there stationed, and requested him to 
send them to headquarters, which he did. With my command I then pro- 



Mar. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 133 

ceeded to Bull Island. That afternoon I was notified that there was a 
strong force on the mainland ; and having made up my mind to visit Bluft- 
ton, i sent to headquarters for another piece of artillery, Avhich I received 
Friday afternoon. 

Friday morning, having got some information that led me to believe 
there was a picket on Savage Islands, on the side towards the mainland, I 
determined to reconnoitre those islands thoroughly. I embarked my com- 
mand and landed them on Savage Islands, thoroughly examined them, and 
found no pickets. On the mainland opposite, the cavalry pickets Avere 
visible, narrowly watching our movements, apparently expecting us to land 
on the mainland above Bluffton. 

At 1.30 o'clock I started on my return to Bull Island. In the morning, 
before starting, I was notified by our pickets that the enemy had that 
morning burned all the buildings (about fifteen in number) on Kirk's plan- 
tation, where we landed yesterday. On our passage to Savage Islands we 
were frequently flred on by the rebel pickets. On our return they again 
fired on us ; and when opposite Kirk's, I ordered my men to return the fire, 
which they did, firing as each boat came abreast the plantation. After 
passing beyond rifie i-ange we could see a cluster of the horsemen ap- 
parently gathered around some wounded or killed companion, as they dis- 
mounted. Most of our shots reached the shore ; but whether we succeeded 
in hitting the enemy or not I could not ascertain. 

That night I received another piece of artillery from headquarters, 
with men to man it. Next morning, after putting one of the guns in a 
position to command the landing at Kirk's, I erabai'ked the men and landed 
at the same place as on Thursday, the 20th, driving in the pickets. I then 
throw out two companies as skirmishers ; and, after advancing a sliort dis- 
tance into the Avood, sent forward tAvo companies more to support them, 
under command of Capt. Plimpton, Acting Major. Lieut. Morrow having 
got his field-piece in position, I left a few men. with an officer, to assist 
him, and advanced the remainder of my force toAvards Bluffton. In ad- 
vancing I found cross-roads, where I left detachments to prevent the 
•enemy getting into our rear. 

We arrived at Bluffton at 12 o'clock, driving the pickets through the 
town a short distance (beyond) ; but finding it impossible to cut them off, 
abandoned the pursuit. \ found the town entirely deserted, Avith the ex- 
ception of three old negroes, Avho informed me there had been no artillery 
there, and there Avas no signs of any or of any eartliAA'orks there or some 
distance up the river. The nearest approach to artillery Avas an old dis- 
mounted iron gun on the blufl" near the church and on the bank of the river. 
I examined the place thoroughly, to be sure there Avere none of the rebels 
secreted. I found none, and neither arms nor ammunition. The tOAvn has 
been apparently only occupied as a headquarters for pickets during the past 
three months. 

One of the rebel pickets, in endeavoring to escape, could not get his 
horse to start, for some reason or other. He was in sight of our advance, 
but at long-range distance; and after endeavoring for a few minutes to 
urge his horse into a run, and being unsuccessful, left his horse and 
blankets and ran for the Avoods, Avhich he reached Avithout further harm 
from us. The horse was a good one, Avhich, Avith a mule taken from Bull 
Island, I have turned over to Colonel Reynolds. GoA-ernment Agent at this 
place, and have his receipt for them. After a tliorough examination of the 
tOAvn, I drew in my command and retired rapidly and in good order Avith- 
out any attack from any quarter, and returned in the boats to Bull Island. 

The oflicers and men behaA^ed like good soldiers, moving steadily and 
quietly to and from the tOAvn, remained in ranks Avhile in the toAvn (Avith 
the exception of such squads as Avere ordered to examine the various 
houses), and in every Avay conducted themselves in a meritorious manner. 

I visited the islands near Bull Island, finding a number of cattle, 
sheep and hogs, and evidences that the enemy obtained some of their fresh 
provisions from these islands. As we were short of rations, 1 had a fcAV 
of the cattle killed and properly distributed among my command. 



134 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IMar. '62. 

On Monday, at 3 p.m., I returned to Hilton Head. All the boats, ^vith 
the exception of three, are at Seabrook, in good order. These three leaked 
badly from the start, and I had them sent to the wharf at Hilton Head for 
repairs. All my command have returned in good health and without one 
accident. 

With great respect, your obedient servant, 

John H. Jackson, Lieut. -Col., Com'd'g 

Third New Hampshire Vols. 
To Enoch Q. Fellows, 

Third Neiv Hampshire Vols., Com'd';/ Post. 

On the 2oth, the rebel Gen. Pemberton directed the abandon- 
ment of Georgetown, and that logs be mounted in place of guns 
removed. 

The following were summoned, the 25th, by Col. Fellows, to 
appear at Headquarters [probably as witnesses in court-martial 
cases. — D, E.] : Capt. Donohoe, Lieut. Cody, Lieut. Ayer, Sergt. 
J. J. Donohoe, Corp. H. B. Keniston and Abraham Sanford, the 
sutler's boy. A postscript added F. A. Lewis and W. H. Choate 
of Co. I. A diary of that date says: "Wilbur in arrest;" and 
probably these summons may have been connected therewith. Gen. 
Wright, at Jacksonville, reported to Gen. Sherman that he left 
Fernandina on the morning of the 24th, with Ninety-seventh Penn- 
sylvania, on the Cosmopolitan, landing at Jacksonville on the evening 
of that day. 

Again, on the 26th, Col. Fellows summoned, as uihiesses on 
general court-martial [the summons states this. — D. E.], Lieut. 
Smith, Lieut. Maxwell and Sergt. Dow. A diary of 2Gth says, 
" Court-martial resumed." 

Gen. Sherman reported under date of 26th to Washington, 
that he had received the direction to confine himself to siege of 
Pulaski, and said his plan had been to carry Pulaski and Savannah 
at same time ; but he. humbly bowed to the decisions of his superiors 
in Washington, and said the material was then rapidly arriving for 
siege of Pulaski. It appears that he did not yet know he had been 
superseded. 

Gen. Lawton, at Savannah, was directed the 26th, by Gen. 
Pemberton, to investigate a report from the Governor of Georgia, 
that the Gladiator recently lauded a cargo of arms at Savannah 
which had been seized by Confederate officers. [The arms were by 
mistake shipped at once to Tennessee, Richmond and other places ; 
and it was agreed that they should be replaced out of next 
arrival. — D. E.-] 

Warren Knowlton of Co. D died on the 27th, and was buried 
at night. On that day. Gen. Hunter was at Baltimore, on the 
Steamer Adelaide, ready to sail to Fort Monroe and thence to his 
new field. He wrote the Secretary of War that he wanted more 
troops, and suggested that 20,000 to 25,000 be added; and if 
Sedgwick's Division could be sent him, with that alone he could 
almost guarantee to have our flag waving over Sumter by the anni- 
versary of its capture. Poor, misguided Hunter ! How you da 
talk ! Sumter won't let you capture it ! 



Mar. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 135 

Gen. Pembertou notified his Secretary of War that he had 
directed the abandonment of the batteries on Cole's Island. Capt. 
Plimpton, the ranking captain, drilled the regiment on the 27th, 
28th and 29th. 

The bodies of Color-Sergt. Dow and another were exhumed on 
the 28th and sent North. 

Gen. Wright's force at Jacksonville was in danger on the 28th ; 
but he said he thought he was to be attacked, and had sent the 
Cosmopolitan to Fernandina for two sections of Hamilton's Battery. 
He also said that Lieut. -Col. Bell, Fourth New Hampshire, at St. 
Augustine, was constantly calling for reinforcements, which he was 
unable to give. 

The Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania were surprised on the 28th, by 
the rebels, on Edisto Island, and lost 23 men captured. The rebels 
burned the bridge connecting Edisto and Little Pxlisto. 

We insert a rebel order which is self-explanatory : — 

2s March 18G2. 
Brig. -Gen. Evaxs to Col. V. F. Stkvkns : 

Colonel : Proceed tonight to Edisto Island, with the infantry force of 
your legion, the Entield Battalion, a section of "tlie Washington Artillery 
and a small detachment of cavalry, and attack the companies of the enemy 
said to be on Little Edisto Island, at the Old Dominion, and aX&u at the 
places (plantations) of Moses Bailey and Whaley. Yon -will attack these 
companies vigoronsly, charge the force on Little Edisto, destroying the 
bridge over Little Edisto after your passage, and drive the enemy off the 
island .... 

The writer has report of Col. Stevens, with list of prisoners 
taken, etc. 

On the 29th, Col. Fellows, still Commanding Post, made a 
detail for nurses in the General Hospital, then recently completed at 
Hilton Head. The selections were from several regiments. The 
Third New Hampshire detail was Private Perry Kittredge (Co. B) , 
Private Arthur Brigham (Co. F), and Private George Murdough 
(Co. H). The latter was sick and was excused from serving by 
the Medical Directoi'. This Hospital was under charge of Asst. 
Surg. J. E. Semple, U. S. A. The hospital itself will be treated 
of separately. Our boys were getting careless at this time in firing 
their pieces when coming off guard, being a little indifferent as to 
the direction the bullets took. On the 29th they sent a few leaden 
messengers to Headquarters of Col. Fellows, who called the provost 
guard to his assistance ; and we were politely informed that the 
direction must be changed. Not being desirous of shooting Col. 
Fellows, we changed direction. 

The writer has an impression that he has not mentioned the 
prevalence of sand storms. When the wind was high, or a fairly 
stiff breeze was blowing, and the sand dry, it was almost impossible 
to drill or otherwise remain out long without weeping — not for 
sorrow, but to " flush" our optics and force out the rapidly gather- 
ing sand. The sand was fine — very fine; and va. fact we used to 
scour our watches with it: i. e., the fine grades. This sand proved 
to be very injurious to the eyes, not only by actual contact but by 
its " glare " on a sunny day. 



136 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Mar. '62. 

We find Capt. Plimpton in command for a few days, owing to 
the fact that Lieut. -Col. Jackson was on duty on a general court- 
martial at the Head ; and Major Bedel was temporarily away at 
Edisto Island, visiting the Forty-seventh New York. 

Sunday, the 30th, we had inspection by Capt. Plimpton. [Col. 
Jackson and Adjt. Hill away, on visit to Bay Point. — D. E.] Mail. 
Maj. Bedel returned, and, calling the boys out, gave a graphic 
description of his adventures at Edisto. The thermometer stood at 
90° that day. The Chaplain preached to us, much to our pleasure, 
after which he attended a negro funeral at Drayton's. 

We have now arrived at the 31st of March — a memorable day 
with us; for Gen. Hunter arrived, much to the surprise of every- 
body, to relieve Gen. Sherman, in whom, apparently, all had great 
confidence. The event was the " talk of the town," and the subject 
was discussed and discussed ; but only one conclusion was arrived 
at: /. e., that of sympathy for Gen. Sherman. 

Gen. Hunter assumed command by his General Order No. 
1, dividing the (new) department into districts, viz. : The 
Northern District, under Brig. -Gen. H. W. Benham, with head- 
quarters at Port Royal; the troops to be designated as the First 
Division, and the district to comprise South Carolina, Georgia and 
all of Florida north and east of a line from Cape Carnaveral north- 
west to Gulf coast north of Cedar Keys and its dependencies, and 
thence north to the Georgia line. The Southern District, under 
Brig. -Gen. J. M. Branuan : the district being the remainder of 
Florida and the islands of the east coast south of the line of the 
Northern District. The Western District, under Brig. -Gen. L. G. 
Arnold : the west coast of Florida, with headquarters at Fort 
Pickens. 

Gen. Hunter's staff was as follows : — 

*Maj. Chas. G. Halpine . . Assistant Acljutaut-Geueral. 
Lieut. E. W. Smith . . . Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. 
Col. J. W. Shafter . . . Chief Qnartermaster. 
Capt. J. W. Turner . . . Cliief Commissary of Subsistence. 
Maj. R. M. Hougli . . . Aide-cle-Camp. 
Maj. Edw. Wright ... 
Capt. R. W. Thompson . . 
Capt. W. R. Dole ... 

Lieut. S. W. Stockton . . 
Lient. Chas. E. Hay ... 
Lieut. A. M. McKenzie . . " 

Lient. A. O. Doolittle . . 



*" Miles O'Reilly." 

On the same day, General Hunter issued his General Order No, 
2, in which he said, in relieving Gen. Sherman, by War Department 
Order of 15th March, he desired to express his thanks to Gen. Sher- 
man for full, reliable and valuable information, etc., furnished him, 
and to express his appreciation of the expedition under his command. 
Gen. Sherman also issued an order turning over the (his) command 
to Gen. Hunter, the substance of which was, that he was all ready 
to open on Pulaski, when the material, then on the Atlantic (just ar- 



Mar. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 137 

rived), was unloaded aud landed at Tybee. Savannah had been cut 
off since 11 Feb. by the batteries on Jones and Bird Islands. He 
had begun preparations for Savannah, but had been directed to dis- 
continue by McClellan. He had laid a plan to take Savannah by a 
coup de main about 20 Jan. ; but the navy failed to co-operate, 
and at date it was too late to do so. 

This was the substance. No reference to his relief by Hunter, 
no regrets were expressed — nothing but entire submission was ex- 
pressed or could be implied : and yet Gen. Sherman must have 
been exceedingly sorrowful while penning the final woi'ds which 
separated him from his command. 

The day was exceedingly wai-m, though it was a "cold day" 
for Sherman. Thermometer 92° in the shade. No drill or dress 
parade, there were so many men away at work. Gen. Wright, the 
same day, asked Gen. Sherman for reinforcements [he was at 
Jacksonville. — D. E.], as the rebels were concentrated on his 
front. Gen. Pemberton suggested to the Governor of Georgia that 
the large quantities of cotton stored in and near Augusta should be 
removed rather than wait for its destruction by fire, if the enemy 
should take Savannah. 

Before closing the month of March, we will state that on the 
26th Feb. the Post Office Department at Washington issued a sort 
of proclamation [received 31 March. — D. E.], recommending the 
appointment of a trustworthy agent in each regiment and brigade to 
handle the mail. The postage to be prepaid, and each piece to be 
registered (five cents). Under this our Chaplain was duly ap- 
pointed postmaster for the regiment, though he had previously acted 
as such. 

We are now in the Department of the South. Up to the 
present time all orders have emanated from "Headquarters E. C." 
(Expeditionary Corps). This name now goes out of existence. 



SUPPLEIVIKNT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

On the 3d the War Department provided for a postmaster for 
each regiment or brigade (see Chaplain Hill's personal sketch), and 
on the 21st sutlers were regulated (see Sutler). 

The Department of the South was created, and Gen. Hunter as- 
signed to the command of it, as noted. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

Gen. Hunter issued his first department order on the 31st, as- 
suming command, announcing his staff, and dividing the depart- 
ment into three districts, — the Northern, the Southern, and the 
Western (under Brig. -Gen. L. G. Arnold), — as already noted. 



138 



THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[J/ar. '62. 



This arrangenieut contiuued till 21st June, — after battle of 
James Island, — when the district system was abolished. It may 
fairly be assumed that this abolition of the district system was in 
part to relieve Gen. Beuham from his command, he having given 
offence in the management of the James Island battle. 

Gen. Hunter's next order (No. 2, same day: 31st) thanked 
Gen. Sherman for his valuable services and -for information, etc., 
turned over to him as his successor. 



The Department statistics for March, 1862, are: Total troops, 
17,821; wounded and sick, 3,764; died, 41; hospital cases, 
wounded etc., 147; died of wounds, etc., 4. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and Staff — men, -officers. 

Band — " - " 

Co. A 95 " 3 " 

B 95 " 3 " 

C 94 " 3 " 

D 89 " 3 " 

E 91 " 3 " 

•F 91 " 3 " 

G 83 " 3 " 

H 88 " 3 " 

I . 84 " 3 " 

K 84 " 2 " 

Present aggregate 960 

Aggregate last report .... 969 

ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 

Sergeants 5555 5 5 4555 

Corporals 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 8 8 

Died of disease ....0001000000 1 

Discharged for disability 2 14 11 9 

Recruits 10 1 

Absent sick 2102003000 8 

Officers in arrest ...0100000000 1 



APRIL, 1862 




FOOLS' DAY ! And the boys had a little fun, just 
to show their remembrance of the fact. In the evening 
a burlesque baud was gotten up and serenaded our Band 
Leader (Ingalls), in fine style. 
^ The Chaplain was that day regularly appointed 

agent to take charge of our mail matters. So large a 
number were away at work that no drill or dress parade 
was inflicted on those in camp. 
The same day our oldest captain, Israel B. Littlefield of Co. K, 
an old ^lexican War veteran, was honorably discharged on his 
resignation. His general health was not good, and his eyes were 
very much affected by the saud. His company parted with him 
with great regret. 

A rebel officer reported to his superior that the enemy had 
retired to the other side of Port Koyal Ferry, and that they lauded 
that morning at Page's Point and burned some houses. 

Capt. Littlefield turned over his company on the '2d to his 1st 
Lieut. (Butterfield) ; and 2d Lieut. Marsh, of F, was assigned to be 
his assistant. And that day Gen. Wright (not knowing that 
Sherman had been relieved) again asked for reinforcements. He 
also was notified later in the day, by Gen. Benham, that the 
Major-General Commanding directed the evacuation of Jacksonville, 
but to make special provision for holding Fernandiua and St. 
Augustine. 

We received orders on the 3d to be read}^ to move at noon ; 
but that was soon changed to three o'clock, and later the important 
event was postponed till the morrow. Packing up and speculating 
as to where we were going, etc., fully occupied our hands and minds 
during the day. The vacaucy in the position of color bearer was 
that day filled by appointing Sergt. Converse D. McDonald of E 
to the responsible position. A letter of that date says, "I think 
we are going to Edisto;" and it proved true. Gen. Hunter an- 
nounced his staff that day, as follows : Surgeon Geo. E. Cooper, 
Medical Director ; Capt. Louis H. Pelouze (Fifteenth U.>S. Infantry) , 
Acting Inspector-General; 1st Lieut. Francis J. Shunk (Ord. Dept. 
U. S. A.), Chief of Ordnance ; 1st Lieut. James H. Wilson (Top. Eng. 
U. S. A.), Chief Topographical Engineer; 1st Lieut. E. J. Keenan 
(Eleventh Pennsylvania), Chief Signal Officer. 

(139) 



Jones Island . . 


. 300 


Hilton Head . . 


. 4.500 


Baj^ Point • . . 


80 


Beaufort . . . 


. 3, GOO 


Otter Island . . 


. 450 


No. Edisto River 


. 1,400 



140 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '62. 

Lieut. Cornelius of Co. D, who had been located at Seabrook 
in charge of a detail of men, whom he had been instructing in the 
use of boats, was that day relieved, and the men too, by another 
detail under an officer of the Eighth Maine. Gen. Hunter reported 
to the Secretary of War, the same day, as to number and location 
of troops in his Department, and asked for 50,000 muskets with 200 
rounds each, and authority to arm such local colored men as could 
be used advantageously ; and to distinguish them, he asked for 
60,000 pairs scarlet paritaloons. 

The troops reported by Gen. Hunter were as follows, and 
scattered from Edisto to St. Augustine : — 

St. Augustine ... 200 
Jacksonville . . . 1,400 
Mouth St. John River 70 
Fernandina . . . 900 

Tybee 2,200 

Daufuskie . . . .1,600 
Bird Island .... 300 

Total . . . 17,000 

Too much scattered, he said, and liable to be cut off in detail. 
Said he should abandon Jacksonville and reinforce Forts Marion 
and Clinch. Said he was nearly ready to open on Pulaski. [He 
should have said, "I found Gen. Sherman subs-tantially ready to 
open on Pulaski." — D. E.] He further said the light draft steamers 
ordered for Sherman had put into Hatteras in a storm, and Burnside 
was detaining them. He reminded the Secretary of War that upon 
leaving Washington he was kind enough to promise whatever force 
he might ask for, and said that it distressed him to be in such a 
beautiful situation for striking strong blows without the arms to 
strike, and begged that the Secretary of War send him at once as 
many men as he thought could be used. 

Our Lieut. -Col. (Jackson) issued an order the 3d to the effect 
that, being ordered to Edisto, those who were unable to go would re- 
main, and Dr. Moulton take charge of the camp. 

We slept but little that night, and on the morning of the 4th 
(early, too) we struck tents and went to the wharf and on board 
the Steamer Ben Deford. Leaving Hilton Head about 9, we reached 
Edisto wharf aboi^t dark ; and nearly all went on shore and went to 
Hopkins' plantation. Another diary says we staid at the Wm. 
Seabrook plantation ; both were correct. The Hopkins place was 
about a mile from the wharf. 

We were in a new country again, where everything was strange ; 
and we didn't " wander" very much, but kept near the main body. 

Next morning (5th) we started inland, marching about ten miles 
to the Dr. Mitchell plantation, where we appai'ently were to stop foi' 
aAvhile. We had artillery and cavalry with us. Co. E quartered 
temporarily in a church on the road and did not join till next day. 



Aiv. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 141 

THE OCCUPATION OF EDISTO ISLAND, S. C, 
BY UNION FORCES. 

Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

North Edisto, S. C, 5 April 1862. 

General : I have the honor to report that the reconuoissance contem- 
plated last evening for today has been made and proved very satisfactory. 
I have taken possession of the entire island, and have not as yet seen the 
enemy. The Third New Hampshire Volunteers and two pieces of artillery 
are stationed at the farther part of the island. I think our position is 
secure, and do not apprehend any danger. The Third New Hampshire 
Volunteers will be reinforced immediately by the Forty-seventh New York 
Volunteers, the Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers being held in reserve. 
Two gunboats of light draught would be of great value to us here as a 
means of defense. The Crusader draAvs too much water to be able to run 
around in the creeks. Gunboats of light draught avIU be able to pass 
around the island, therefore keeping the enemy at bay and securing all 
necessary positions. The Steamer Boston arrived at this post this after- 
noon. The Sloop of War Dale is still in Saint Helena Sound. I am not 
fully prepared to give you a full detail of the difl'erent positions now held 
by our forces, but will make a full report soon. Col. Moore has permission 
to visit Hilton Head, leaving Maj. Kane in command, Avho is fully com- 
petent. The Ben Defunl returns to Hilton Head early tomorrow. A line 
of communication is kept up Avith the outposts by means of the cavalry. I 
will make a further report tomorrow. 

I am. General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, 

E. Q. Fellows, 
Col. Third New Hampshire Vols., Commanding Post. 



THE MARCH TO MITCHELL'S PLANTATION. 

It was said that the cause of our removal to Edisto was that 
the Forty-seventh New York and Fifty-fifth Pennsj^lvania, previously 
stationed on the island, had been attacked by a superior force and 
driven back to the lauding, and we were to reinforce them. Next 
morning after landing we started for the interior of the island. We 
were soon joined by several negroes, and our men were not slow in 
chartering them to carry their knapsacks ; and some carried three 
or four upon their heads — their peculiar method of transportation. 

Our march was about eight miles, and a tedious march it was ; 
for the da}' was exceedingly warm. This was our first long march 
with knapsacks packed. 

When we had covered half the distance our ranks began to 
grow thin, many falling out completely exhausted, although we 
made frequent halts. We arrived late in the afternoon where we 
were to quarter. 

The mansion house was soon occupied by the officers ; and it 
was made headquarters. The Chaplain says: "In the march found 
no rebels. Made headquarters at Dr. Mitchell's place. I got fine 
quarters in the old mansion." The men were mostly quartered in 
the negro cabins. The Steamer Boston came up to Edisto the same 
day with several of our men, and baggage, etc. 



142 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Ajn: '62. 

EDISTO — FIRST NIGHT ON PICKET. 
[By aVo. K man.] 

Co. K was ordered on picket and proceeded to our post after dark. 
'Twas so dark Ave knew not whether the rebels were in our front or rear, 
right or left, near or distant. Orders were given that no one Avould be 
permitted to lie down. The mosquitoes soon began their revelling; and 
such mosquitoes we never saw before, thej^ being of a larger variety and 
more numerous than any we had ever encountered. They were, in fact, so 
numerous that a nervous person would almost have fits if obliged to stay 
out of doors with them over night. 

About midnight the men began to lie down in spite of the vigilance of 
the officers. Exhausted nature was superior to orders. When found nec- 
essary — absolutely so — the orders were modified, and one-half the men 
permitted to lie down at a time, but not to sleep. Soon a snore was heard ; 
but an investigation, in the extreme darkness, revealed no one asleep I 
Thus passed our first night's picket on Edisto. At daybreak we returned 
to Mitchell's plantation. 



On Sunday the 6th we had no drill or dress parade, and no 
services, the majority of the men being on picket, while Co. E fur- 
nished all the men for camp guard. Several diaries say we were 
paid off that day for two months : and it must be accepted as a fact, 
Sunday to the contrary notwithstanding. Col. Jackson reported 
the same day to Col. Fellows, Commanding Post of North Edisto, 
the disposition of his pickets during the previous night and recom- 
mended that a gunboat be sent to guard the numerous landing places, 
and also suggested that Surgeons Moulton and Eaton and the Hos- 
pital Steward and Commissary, with their tents, etc., be ordered to 
join the regiment. [These were all left at our camp at Hilton Head 
on the 4th.— D. E.] 



EDISTO — IN GENERAL. 

The picket duty there Avas the most tedious we had in South 
Carolina. In a few weeks after our arrival the "minges" made 
their appearance, and tormented us nigh unto death. Mosquito 
netting (technically "mosquito bars") was issued as a measure 
of relief ; but the meshes were so large that the minges easily passed 
through. Our quarters were the old negro huts (cabins), which 
were inhabited by fleas on our arrival. As we were determined to 
occupy the same quarters, many and hot were the battles between 
us, and in which more or less blood was shed. 

The reader will perceive that our nights were disagreeable, 
whether on picket or in quarters. The abandoned cotton fields, 
not having a cultivator, brought forth blackberries spontaneously. 
They were so plenty, some of us ate but little else. The pickers 
for sale got ten cents a quart readily. 

Boat loads of negroes, of both sexes, old and young, came over 
from " de main" nearly every night, and in such numbers that pro- 
vision could scarcely be made for them. They were shipped to 
Hilton Head and St. Helena Islands as fast as possible. 



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144 THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '62. 

At one time a sort of mania for gambling seized the men, many 
of them, and it took the particuUar form called a "sweat board." 
Daily and hourly, while the fever lasted, men could be seen singly, 
in pairs and by squads, silently stealing away into the bushes to ply 
their favorite game. Much money changed hands. In vain the offi- 
cers attempted to stop it. They only succeeded in reducing its propor- 
tions. This mania suddenly disappeared, without leaving a trace 
behind, save in the minds and pockets of those who had been 
fleeced. 

The regiment was divided up soon after our arrival at the 
Mitchell plantation, though the Headquarters of the regiment 
remained there during our entire stay. 

On the 7th, Col. Jackson reported to Col. Fellows that the 
provisions were nearly exhausted ; that the men were sick, and the 
doctor much needed. He further said he wanted the baud [The 
band was retained at Headquarters of the Post, on landing at 
Edisto. — D.E.], and their absence was a general disappointment; 
that the regiment was being paid off, and he desired to send the 
Chaplain to Hilton Head with money and packages. 

Col. Fellows, Commanding Post, issued an order the same day, 
regarding, passes to contrabands, and named the following Govern- 
ment Superintendents as the only persons authorized to give such 
passes : Jules De La Croix, J. W. R. Hill, F. C. Barnard and C. E. 
Rich. 

A diary of the 7th says : " The Forty-seventh New York is to 
go to Little Edisto tomorrow, and Co. F and two other companies 
are to do duty here as home guard." 

A part of the Forty-seventh New York arrived at our camp the 
7th, under Maj. Kane, and Avere paid off. They took a 12-pounder 
howitzer for Little Edisto. The Adjutant (Hill) was thrown from 
his horse the 7th, and was considerably hurt. He had previously 
tendered his resignation, owing to failing health. He was with 
Capt. Littlefield in the Mexican War. 

Gen. Wright today notified the people of Jacksonville thnt his 
forces are to evacuate that city. (This latter item and the next 
which follows may have some connection.) 

Gov. Milton of Florida complained to Jeff. Davis of the condi- 
tion of affairs in Florida. He said he would soon proclaim martial 
law because of the disposition manifested in several places to submit 
to the enemy, and in fact at the first opportunity to rally to their 
standard. That must have been truly refreshing to Jeff. Davis. 

Col. Fellows was (8 April) directed by Gen. Beuham, Com- 
manding Northern, District, substantially as follows: The General 
Commanding desires you to take every opportunity, either by 
negroes who come from the rebels, by scouts, etc., of acquiring 
and transmitting to him all information, with sketches, plans and 
descriptions of the best routes for approaching Charleston or James 
Island, either by land or water. If the rebels come down in force 
to occupy or remain at Jehossee Island, and you feel sure you have 



Apr. '6l>.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 145 

streugth enough, with aid from Otter Island, to make a dart at them 
aud rout them from there, j'ou are authorized to do it ; or, ou learning 
from you that more force would be required, he would, if such force 
were available from this vicinity, either send or take it to you for 
such purpose. It does not, he continues, appear desirable to occupy 
the island further inland than Edisto, except such small portions of 
adjacent shores as may bo necessary for the security of our pickets 
on that island, and the main body of your troops will habitually be 
kept in such position that they can easily be concentrated for resist- 
ance to an attack. 

A flag staff was erected 8th April ; our tents had not yet arrived. 

Gen. Wright completed his arrangements (8 April) for evacua- 
ting Jacksonville, by sending 60 days' rations, and 60,000 rounds 
of 69 calibre to St. Augustine. Gen. Pemberton (rebel) reports 
that Cole's Island is not yet evacuated. He also urges haste in the 
new connection by rail between Charleston and Savannah. Today, 
also, a regimental order restored Cai)t. Wilbur to duty. 

The separation of our companies was referred to 8th April by 
the Chaplain, thus : " Our regiment is much divided up — some eight 
miles apart; very bad for religious purposes, but the result of war." 

Col. Fellows replied to Benham on the 9th, substantially that 
he would do as desired. Said he reached the outposts the previous 
day and found them well posted and the whole force (two regiments 
infantry and four pieces artillery) in such position that they could 
be quickly concentrated. Thouglit there were not many rebels on 
Jehossee. He further said he would soon make a reconnoissance, on 
the FocaJiontas, toward White Point on the Dawho River, and asked 
for a seven-feet-draft gunboat, as the Dale had not yet arrived, and 
that he would forward contrabands at once by the Mayjiower. 
Matters were getting interesting : for Col. Fellows ordered (9 April) 
that all negroes be in their cabins at 8 p.m. ; that all soldiers in em- 
ploy of Government Agents be at once sent to their regiments ; and 
all boats be placed under the Provost Marshal. Mail. A diary says, 
" Had orders to load, at evening roll call." 

Ou the lOth, Gen. Wright announced his arrival at Fernandina, 
and that he had brought with him the Unionists from Jacksonville. 
He directed that they be housed in some of the vacant houses, and 
that rations be furnished ; and such as are able to pay for same. 

Gen. Lee said to Gen. Pemberton that day that Beauregard 
was pressed for troops, and to send, if possible, Donelsou's brigade 
of two regiments to Corinth, and concluded his letter by saving that 
if the Mississippi Valley was lost, the Atlantic States would be 
ruined. 

Some of our officers (presumably the field officers) , went very 
near Jehossee the 10th — near enough to see the rebel pickets. Regi- 
mental Order No. 18, of that date, directed that the guns of the 
men be fired once in three days, aud at a target at long range. 

A rebel order directed the dismantling pt Fort Chapman on 
the Ashepoo River, and logs to be placed in lieu of the guns re- 
moved . 



146 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '02. 

"^"j The lOtli day of April was auother day big with iuterest, for 
the bombardmeut of Pulaski began that morning, and we heard the 
distant cannonading — boom, boom, boom — all day long. 



THE STORY OF FORT PULASKI. 

Fort Pulaski is located upon Cockspur Island, on the southerly 
side of the Savannah River. The island is entirely marsh, about 
one mile long by half a mile wide. The fort commanded both chan- 



■i— 




FORT PULASKI, GA. 

nels. It was built of brick, with five sides, all of which were case- 
mated. The walls were seven and one-half feet thick and twenty- 
five feet high above high-water mark. Its armament consisted of one 
tier of guns in embrasure and one en barbette. The gorge was cov- 
ered by an earthen outwork of bold relief. Around the main work 
was a forty-eight-foot ditch, and around the demi-lune a thirty-two- 
loot ditch. Communication was by two drawbridges. There were 
48 guns, 20 of which bore upon Tybee Island: 5 10-in. Colum- 
biads, 5 8-in. Columbiads, 4 32-pouuder rifles, 1 24-pouuder Blakely 
rifle, 2 12-in. and 3 10-in. sea-coast mortars. 140 guns would have 
been a full armament. 

In order to proceed in such a manner with this remarkable 
siege as to make the recital intelligent and interesting, it seems 
proper at this point to insert a bit of history. 

On 2 Jan. 1861, Gov. Brown of Georgia, fearing that Fort 
Pulaski would be reinforced and thus lost to the Confederacy, issued 
his orders directing Col. A. R. Lawton, commanding the First Regi- 
ment of Georgia Volunteers, to act at once ; and the following was 
the order : — 

Sir: In view of the fact that the Government at Washington has . . . . 
decided on the policy of coercing a seceding State back into the Union 
.... to the end, therefore, that this stronghold (Pulaski), which com- 
mands the entrance into Georgia, may not be occupied by any hostile force 
until the convention of the State of Georgia .... [16th inst.] has decided 
upon the policy which Georgia will adopt in this emergency, you are ordered 
to take possession of Fort Pulaski as by public order herewith, and hold it 
under orders from me or evacuate under compulsion by an overpowering 

hostile force Joseph E. Brown, 

Governor and Commander-in-Gldef. 



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148 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIKE REGIMENT. \_Ajn-r62. 

Early on the moniiug of the 3d of Jamiaiy, a detachment from 
the Chatham Artillery (Capt. Clajihorn), the Savannah Volunteer 
Guards (Capt. Screven), the Oolethorpe Light Infantry (Capt. Bur- 
tow), — say 125 men, — all under Col. Lawton, went to Pulaski by 
steamer and took possession at noon in the name of the State of 
Georgia. 

There was no resistance from the ordnance sergeant and the 
few men under him. The flag of Georgia was hoisted in place of 
the stars and stripes. This is said to have been the first flag raised 
in secession. 

The State Convention met and adopted a resolution approving 
the act of Gov. Brown, the resolution being moved by Eobert 
Toombs, who had just vacated his seat in the U. S. Senate. 

Having given this bit of histoi-y, the narration of Fort Pulaski's 
experience in its recapture will be proceeded with. 

It nuist be borue in mind that the capture of Port Royal was 
on the 7th of November. It would appear that the subject of 
Pulaski's capture was early considered; for on the 1st of December, 
Capt. Q. A. Gillmore reported to Gen. Sherman the result of a 
reconnoissance of Savannah river, etc. He reported that he went 
down on the Steamer Bpv Deford, on the 29th of November, to 
Tybee, and recommended that a regiment be placed thereon, to hold 
it for base of future operations. He further reported that in a 
siege, after obtaining the range, five-eighths of all shells fired could 
be lodged in the fort, and he would want mortars enough to drop a 
shell each minute into the fort, and an equal number of guns. 

On the 21st of February, 1862, the first vessel arrived at Tybee 
with ordnance and ordnance stores. Troops had previously been 
landed and preparations made for the mounting of the necessary 
guns with which to reduce the doomed fort. The mortars were the 
most difficult to land, and the officials were for the moment puzzled 
as to what method to pursue. These iron monsters had been laden 
at Norfolk by the use of heavy shears, or derricks ; but the apparatus 
was not brought along. The masts of the vessels (mostly schooners) 
were not strong enough for the purpose. 

The writer is informed upon good authority that Gen. Sherman 
jocularly taunted his Staff with its inability to laud a mortar ; where- 
upon Quartermaster Fuller, who had some knowledge of the sea and 
what could be done with ropes, volunteered to land the mortars if 
given full power to obtain the necessary materials and men from 
anywhere within the Department. To this Gen. Sherman at once 
assented. 

Capt. Fuller at once proceeded to the Wabash and borrowed 
several of her largest spars, and had ropes innumerable, and 
several sailors detailed, and was soon on his way to the important 
point off Tybee. Shears were then rigged up in the stoutest possi- 
ble manner, and also an improvised derrick. Large scows were 
brought alongside, being planked over, and a mortar placed care- 
fully in (on) the center, and towed ashore at high tide, the mortar 
being dumped as soon as the scow touched the bottom. The towing 



Apr. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. ' 149 

was done by three row boats, ranged practically side by side, but 
kept apart by skill ; and this ouly after Capt. Fuller had instructed 
the rowers ((xernian soldiers) how to do it. At low tide, heavy 
ropes were made fast to the trunnions of the mortars, and hundreds 
of willing hands tugged at the ropes, dragging the mortars by force 
only to the high-water mark, from which point they were moved to 
their destined stations by engineering processes in connection with 
the force of hundreds of soldiers. 

Capt. Fuller, in his connection with this affair, so irritated a 
German officer that a challenge was sent. It leaked out, and as a 
result Capt. Fuller's friends provided him with an elegant and 
costly pair of pistols, which he retains to this day. The challenge 
never got beyond the sending of it and its reception. 

The work of moving and mounting the various guns on Tybee 
was immense, and would almost demand a chapter by itself to 
describe it. 

The work of preparation for the siege went for^^'ard with as 
much rapidity as could reasonably be expecte.d. Gen. Sherman 
seemed determined that the fort should fall into his hands, and 
neither men nor material were spared ; but Gen. Sherman was 
destined to be relieved just prior to the taking of the fort, and 
another was fated to be the sender to Washington of the news of 
the capture of the fort. This must have been a great blow to the 
pride of Gen. Sherman. All ready to strike the blow, and be re- 
lieved ! A few days longer, and full credit would have been his. 
[The reader will please excuse the writer for inserting the above just 
at this point; but it seemed fitting, and in it went.] 

The forces upon Tybee were : the P"'orty-sixth New York, Col. 
Rudolph Rosa ; Seventh Connecticut, Col. Alfred H. Terry ; New 
York V'olunteer F^ngineers, Lieut. -Col. Jas. F. Hall; 2 companies 
of Third Rhode Island Artillery, Capts. Mason and Rogers ; a de- 
tachment of Co. A of the Corps of Engineers, under Sergt. Jas. E. 
Wilson. 

On the 1st of April, Gen. Benham (he was just then taking 
hold) suggested to Gen. Viele (then on Daufuskie Island with 
troops) that he (Viele) might be able to erect batteries to fire at 
south and south-east faces, and possibly at the north-east face, of 
Pulaski, and aid in the reduction of the fort, and suggested as a 
location the lower end of Long Island, and directed a recounoissance 
with that object in view. He said Gillmore had a project of building 
a large scow, to float to position and then be used as a basis* for a 
battery. He further said he had in view the restoration of a part 
at least of the excellent troops of his (Viele's) brigade. 

On the same day. Gen. Benham suggested to Gillmore that he 
take his proposed scow to Lazaretto Creek, and there make a battery ; 
and if found to be all right, Viele should have one or two of the 
same kind. If reinforced before he began firing (Gillmore was in 
command at Tybee), and a senior was with such- troops, Benham 
agreed that Gen. Hunter and Gen. Wright and himself would see 
that justice was done, in its fullest sense, for all his labors and 
efforts. 



loO THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Ajyr. '62. 

On the 2d of April, Beubam said to Viele : "There is a small, 
dry ridge ou Turtle Island, nearly opposite Bloody Point, that 
would be a good spot for a battery, to operate against Pulaski (two 
miles). All the large mortars," said he, "have been landed at 
Tybee ; but there are here (at Hilton Head) two 10-inch and two 8- 
ineh C'olumbiads which can be sent you." 

On the 3d of April, Benham further said to Viele : ' ' Seventeen of 
Gillmore's men have been captured," and feared they might give 
information and cause a hastening of preparations and premature 
commencement of the siege, and directed Viele to keep sealed all 
communication between the fort and city. 

The same day, Viele said to Benham : " Two officers have made 
the proposed reconnoissance, and report that two flat-boats with 
mortars, rifled guns and howitzers can be made effective at Long 
Island ; that it would take a week or ten days to regularly mount 
guns in position, and that would be too late." 

The same day, Benham said to DuPont that he learned that 
$12,000 had been offered to get the garrison of Fort Pulaski out of 
fort and urged vigilance and activity on part of navy. 

On the 4th, Benham said to Viele that he was satisfied that the 
lower end of Long Island was the spot for a battery, and proposed 
four guns, 'and said 30 yards front was a plenty. 

The same day, Viele said to Benham : "Guns can be placed in 
position on Long Island at once," and he had one 8-inch and one 
10-inch mortar which he could use. Further, that the rebels were 
busy all night moving troops towards Wilmington Island. Evidently 
something was on the tapis. 

On the 8th of April, Hunter said to DuPont: "I contemplate 
opening the attack on Fort Pulaski by sunrise tomorrow morning, and 
have to ask of you all the co-operation and assistance in 3'our power. 
A few days further delay would place our batteries ou Tybee Island in 
a perfect condition, perhaps ; but I am satisfied that such delay 
would be of more service to the enemy than to ourselves." 

The following is self explanatory : — 

No. Battery. Distance from Pulaski, Armament. 

Yards. 

1. Halleck .... 2,400 ... 2 13-inch mortars. 

2. Stanton .... 8,400 ... 3 13-inch mortars. 

3. Grant .... 3,200 ... 3 13-iuch mortars. 

4. Lyon .... 3,100 ... 3 10-inch Cohmibiads. 
'>. Lincoln .... 3,045 ... 3 8-inch Cohimbiads. 
C>. Bnrnside . . . 2,750 ... 1 13-iuch mortar. 

7. Sherman . . . 2,650 ... 3 13-incli mortars. 

8. Scott 1,740 . . |J ^^[jjj^jjl Columbiads. 

9. Siegel .... 1,670 . . 1 5 ^O-pounder Parrotts^ 

*= (1 48-pounder James rifle. 

10. McClellan . . . 1,650 . . i 2 84-ponnder James rifles. 

' \ 2 64-ponnder James rifles. 

11. Totten . . . 1,650 ... 4 lO-inch siege mortars. 
Ou the 9th, Gillmore was nearly ready to issue his order for the 

siege to begin at sunrise. The signal to be a single shot from the 
right mortar in Battery Halleck, the firing then to proceed at a speci- 
fied rapidity, the quickest being once per minute, and the slowest 



Apr. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 151 

once in ten minutes. Four batteries were served b}^ the Third Rhode 
Island Artillerj', and all others by infantry, except that on the 11th 
the sailors from the Wabash served Battery Siegel. 

In Battery Burnside were Sergts. .lames E. Wilson and P. 
Maguire of Co. A, U. S. Engineers, and Sergt. (afterward Captain) 
Andrew J. Wadlia of Co. G, Third New Hampshire Volunteers, 
with a detachment of the Eighth Maine, in three reliefs. 

The siege began as directed, the details of which need not be 
here described. The 13-in. mortars were said to have been quite 
inaccurate, only about one-teuth of all shots fired dropping within 
Pulaski. 

The casualties on Tyl)ee were very few. But one man was 
killed — Private Thomas Campbell, Co. II, Third Rhode Island Ar- 
tillery. A few were slightly injured. Surgeon Francis Bacon, Seventh 
Connecticut, and Brigade Surgeon Craven, were present during the 
siege. A 10-in. mortar on Long Island was served on the 11th 
by a detachment of the Forty-eighth New York, Major Beard ; 
but the distance was so great, not one of the shots reached the fort. 

Gillmore's order announcing the capture of the fort mentioued 
as present and serving with distinction: Capt. C. E. Fuller, Quarter- 
master (unloaded ordnance and ordnance stores) ; Col. Alfred H. 
Terr}^, Seventh Connecticut; Lieut. Col. James F. Hall, New York 
Volunteer Engineers ; Capt. Hunkell, with a company of Forty-sixth 
New York (occupied a hulk, Avith battery, in Lazaretto Creek) ; 
Lieut. Horace Porter, Ordnance Officer ; Lieut. James H. Wilson, 
Topographical Engineers ; Capt. Louis H. Pelouze, Fifteenth United 
States Infantry; Capt. J. W. Turner, C. S., U. S. Army; Capt. 
McArthur, Eighth Maine ; Capt. F. E. Graef, Co. D, New York 
Volunteer Engineers ; Lieut. I. L. Brooks, Co. A, New York Volun- 
teer Engineers; Commander C. R. P. Rodgers and Lieut. John 
Irwin, U. S. Navy ; Lieut. W. L. M. Burger, New York Volunteer 
Engineers ; Lieut. P. H. O'Rorke, Engineer Corps ; Adam Badeau, 
Esq. ; Sergt. James E. Wilson, Co. A, Engineer Corps. 

On the 10th of April, Gen. Hunter sent the following demand 
for surrender : — 

Sir : I hereby demand of j'oii the immediate surrender and restoration 
of Fort Pulaski to the authority and possession of the United States. This 
demand is made Avith a view to avoiding, if possible, the eQusion of blood 
Avhich mast result from the bombardment and attack now in readiness to 
be opened. The number, calibre and completeness of the batteries sur- 
rounding you, leave no doubt as to Avhat must result in case of your refusal ; 
and as the defense, hoAA'ever obstinate, must eventually succumb to the 
assailing force at my disposal, it is hoped you may see fit to avert the useless 
Avaste of life. This communication Avill be carried to you under a flag of 
truce, by Lieut. J. H. Wilson, U. S. Array, Avho is authorized to Avait any 
period not exceeding thirty minutes from delivery, for your ansAA'er. 

The iueAitable result of the bombardment, which followed the 
Confederate commander's refusal to surrender, was its capture, after 
partial destruction. It is said that Col. Olmstead replied, in sub- 
stance, to the demand for surrender, that he was there to defend the 
fort — not to surrender it. 

On the 11th, upon the signal of surrender. Gen. Gillmore, 



152 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [A2yr.'62. 

Capt. A. B. Ely (A. A. A.-G. to Benhani) aud Maj. Charles G. 
Halpine repaired to the fort to arrange the terms of surrender, which 
were as follows : ] . The fort, armament and garrison to be surren- 
dered at once to the forces of the United States. 2. The officers and 
men of the garrison to be allowed to take with them all their private 
effects, such as clothing, bedding, books, etc. : this not to include 
private weapons. 3. The sick and wounded, under charge of the 
Hospital Steward of the garrison, to be sent up under a flag of truce 
to the Confederate lines ; and at the same time the men to be allowed 
to send up any letters they may desire, subject to the inspection of 
a Federal officer. 

The articles were signed by Chas. H. Olmstead, Col. First 
Georgia Regiment, Commanding Fort Pulaski ; and by Q. A. Gillmore, 
Brig. -Gen. Volunteers, Commanding U.S. Forces, Tybee Island, Ga, 
These articles were endorsed by Gen. Benham, authorizing them, 
subject to the approval of Gen. Hunter, who gave the final approval. 

Gen. Benham's report to Hunter says 337 men, 24 officers and 
18 sick and wounded were surrendered. Gen. Hunter's report to the 
Secretary of War says the bombardment began about 8 a.m. on the 
10th, and the surrender was at 2 p.m. on the 11th; that the capture 
included 47 guns, 40,000 lbs. of powder and 360 prisoners. 

The bombardment was quite plainly heard by the men of the 
Third New Hampshire, the regimeut being located at Edisto Island. 



On the 11th, Lieut. Hj'ues, Co. A, wandered near enough to 
the rebels (by accident, probably) to draw the fire of a picket. 
Two companies of rebels were seen to leave Jehossee. Gen. Lee, 
at Richmond, received the soul-stirring news, at 11.40 p.3i., that 
Pulaski had surrendered. 

Gen. Wright, on the 13th, reported his evacuation of Jacksonville 
on the 8th, and stated his troops there to have been the Ninety- 
seventh Pennsylvania, 6 companies Fourth New Hampshire, and 2 
sections Hamilton's Battery. He further said that as they came down 
the river, they took one company of Fourth New Hampshire on at 
Mayport, near the mouth of the river. The garrison of St. Augustine 
at time of writing was 7 companies Fourth New Hampshire ; and at 
Fernandina were 3 companies Fourth New Hampshire, the Ninth 
Maine and one company of Engineers. He did n't actually pass over 
the bar until 3 p.m. of the 10th. 

Gen. Hunter, at Pulaski, on the 13th, declared free all persons 
of color at Pulaski : General Orders 7. We had services that day; 
but there were so few present that it seemed hardly worth while. A 
rebel report of the 14th said of Pulaski: That it had a breach big 
enough for a four-horse team to drive through ; gave the armament 
and said they "had 130 rounds for each gun." 

Our artillery (14th) shelled the rebs from near a ferry in our 
viciuity, being supported by three companies of infantx'y (regiment 
unknown to writer). The Chaplain's diary says he walked about 12 
miles the 14th, visiting the companies to collect money and packages 
for express. 




Gen. Tkumax Seymouu. Gen. Joseph R. Hawley, 




Gen. Joseph C. Abbott. 



Apr. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 153 

A diai7 of the 15th said: "Some of our boys have gone to 
build a bridge across to Jehossee. Two companies of the Fifty-fifth 
Pennsylvania came here last night with five days' rations, as support." 
Capt. Wilbur and a few men went out hunting wild calves the loth, 
stopping at the McCarthy place and feloniously taking therefrom 
several books and other truck. The various movements indicated 
that something was to occur soon. We heard the loth that Pulaski 
had been taken ; and great was our joy. 

The discharge of Capt. Wiggin of Co. G, and of Adjt. Hill, were 
announced the 15th by regimental order (both dating 14th) ; and 
Lieut. Emmons was directed to relieve Capt. AViggiu, and Lieut. 
T. M. Jackson was directed to act as adjutant. Co. B left Head- 
quarters at Mitchell's that day, and went to the Edding plantation, 
about 5 miles distant, and on the bank of the North "Edisto River, 
from whence they could see the rebels on the mainland. Mail. The 
troops were ordered to be ready to move on the morrow on some 
expedition. 

CO. H SORTIE. 

The party consisted of Capt. Rhind (navy), Dr. Britnall, 
Master's Mate Nelson, with 30 men and a howitzer, all from the 
Crusader; and 30 men of Forty-seventh New York, Fifty-fifth 
Pennsylvania and Third New Hampshire, all under Capt. Dow, Co. 
H, Third New Hampshire. The expedition was gotten up by Capt. 
Rhind to punish the rebs for firing on one of his unarmed boats. 

The expedition started at midnight of the 17th, and landed at 
Rockville, on John's Island, skirmishing through the village and three 
and a half miles beyond to Seabrook's plantation ; but the gun of a 
sailor was fired, by accident, and alarmed the rebs, who fled. Re- 
mained at that place till morning, then saw rebel cavalry approaching. 
Capt. Dow ordered Lieut. Bedell of Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania with his 
men (Co. K), to occupy a bridge, and thus prevented an intended 
flank movement. 

A well-directed volley sent the rebs rapidly rearward. A 
howitzer shell exploded in their midst. The rebs then returned as 
if to charge ; but the muskets and howitzers did good work, and the 
rebs broke again, and again rallied. The rebs were fully 200 strong; 
but this third charge was ended abruptl}' bj' Capt. Rhind, who ex- 
claimed, "Now, boys, fight or die 1 " and the result was the rebs 
again fled in disorder and did not again renew the attack. 



EDISTO — JEHOSSEE ISLAND RECONNOISSANCE. 

On the 17th, a recounoissance was ordered in the direction of 
Jehossee Island, about three miles distant, and lying between Edisto 
and the mainland. Arriving at the creek, a bridge was thrown 
across ; but it sank beneath our weight, and we were obliged to wade 
knee deep. Two pieces of the Third Rhode Island Artillei-y accom- 
panied us, and occasionally forwarded our compliments in an iron 
envelope. Our route lay through Gov. Ailcen's plantation, which 



154 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '62. 

was a remarkablj' large one and well fitted up for the accommodation 
of the hands — glass windows, brick chimneys and other things to 
correspond. 

We found the grave of one of our pickets (Private John Saupp, 
Co. K, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania) , who had been shot on his post by 
the rebels and also buried by them. But such a burial ! He was 
buried on the ground and not in, it. The earth was heaped upon the 
body, only partially covering it, his feet, hands and hair being visi- 
ble. At the foot of the grave (?) was a rude board, with the 
inscription, " Yankey Soldier," cut by a rebel jack-knife, propelled by 
an unholy hand, if the carver and undertaker were the same person. 
This body was the next day removed inside our lines and given decent 
burial and awarded military honors. 

After remaining on Jehossee Island a fcAv hours, and discovering 
no enemy, we returned to Edisto laden with spoil, such as chairs, 
kettles, pans, shovels, etc. While on our homeward m.arch the rebels 
fired a few shots at us, probably on the supposition that we were on 
a retreat. 



The same day Gen. Benham directed Gen. Wright to relieve 
Col. Fellows (at Edisto), and also (another order) forbade the 
removal of any subsistence, forage, mules, horses, oxen, cows, sheep 
or CAttle of any kind from the plantations without permits from the 
U. S. Treasury Agents. Just why he failed to insert " roosters and 
hen- fruit" in the list is beyond comprehension. 

We got a mail on the 18th, and the day was unusually warm. 
Sickness — apparently more than its share — developed in Co. B on 
the 19th: for a diary of that date says, " 20 taken sick Avith bloody 
dysentery." The Chaplain completed the express job that day, and 
said there were 427 packages. 

Co. B men were not all sick that day, for 30 of them went to 
Pon Pon Island, and killed 12 cattle and 10 sheep. Gen. Beuham's 
order, of course, had not been promulgated. The Captain of Co. B 
was a rover, and very skilled in shooting on the fly, and naturally 
inspired his men with a desire for game. 

A large fire in the woods not far distant somewhat disturbed us 
on the night of the lOth, as none could say it was not a ruse to attract 
our attention while the rebs should attack us. 

On Sunday, the 20th, we had the usual inspection and sermon ; 
and we heard that Gen. Wright's brigade was landing on the island. 
Mail. Only three companies at Headquarters (Mitchell's) on 'the 
20th, the others being stationed at various plantations on the island. 
A, C and D were at Bailey's under Maj. Bedel. 

The Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania arrived the 20th. Gen. Wright 
was ordered on the 21st to assume command at Edisto, relieving 
(our) Col. Fellows. [The latter went home on CO days' leave on 
the 24th.— D. E.] 

The Chaplain went to Hilton Head the 21st, with express 
packages ; and, in order to get them on board at Edisto, had to detail 



Ajn: '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 155 

himself as a fatigue party of oue and carry tlie 111 boxes quite a 
distauce by liaud. Band Master lugalls Avent on the same steamer 
to Hilton Head (on a visit, probably). The money sent was over 
$20,.000, in 31 T) lots. 

Capt. Dow of Co. H was appointed Provost Marshal on the 
22d, during the temporary absence of Capt. Van Brunt. 

Gen. Hunter granted a 60 days' leave to our Col. Fellows on 
the 28d. 

On that day occurred one of those distressing accidents against 
which there seems to be no protection. Soon after guard mount, 
two comrades of Co. I were " fooling" with their guns, having come 
off guard mount and their pieces being loaded. Suddenly one of 
the twain was ushered without warning into the presence of his 
Maker. The gun of Alonzo A. Lewis had become accidentally 
discharged, and his companion, Private Henry E. BoUes, was a dead 
man. The ball entered the neck, in front, at the throat, and made 
its exit back of the right ear. Death was instantaneous, without a 
doubt. But what a pitiable state of mind the survivor was in ! The 
writer will not attempt to describe that state, further than to say that 
Private Lewis suffered more in his mind than the sympathetic or 
imaginative person can fairly describe. 'T was a sad spectacle — 
the dead man, the grief-stricken comrade, the saddened gathering of 
comrades. The remembrance of it is yet vividly portrayed upon the 
writer's memory. The funeral on the following day was indeed a 
sad one — more so than if he had been killed in battle. Many days 
passed ere the sadness — like a fog — lifted from the camp. This 
occurred at ]Mitcheirs plantation (Headquarters). 

As a sort of sequel to this occurrence, the writer, in his capacity 
as historian, in 1888, had placed in his hands a Bible which had been 
the property of Private Bolles (sent out to him b}^ some loved one at 
home) , and which by some means fell into the hands of our Chaplain, 
and thence to his widow, who turned it over to the writer for delivery 
to the donor or nearest relatives. This was done in 1888, a search 
failing to reveal the donor ; and it was finally given to a beloved 
sister, who no doubt prizes it very highly. 

On the 24th, Co. B, then at Edding's Wharf, was relieved by a 
company of Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania. [This Company of Fifty-fifth 
Pennsylvania was under our Col. Jackson temporarily. — D. E.] 
Co. B returned to headquarters of regiment, arriving the 2.jth. A 
company of the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania was ordered, same day, 
to headquarters of Post, relieving a company of the Fifty-fifth 
Pennsjdvania. 

Thermometer, the 25th, only 109° in the shade. Whew! The 
band came the 25th to the Mitchell plantation, from headquarters of 
Post; and weren't we glad to see them again, armed with their brass 
pieces ! On the 25th we got a mail, and our Chaplain returned from 
Hilton Head, worn out with his excessive labors. 

Gen. Wright ordered (25th) that the troops should have company 
and battalion drill daily and the two flanking companies should drill 
as skirmishers in the morning. We were getting domesticated again ; 



loG THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Ajn: '62. 

for a diary saya : "Went off and got two loads lumber to build house 
over our cook-tent, and have built a barn today for a cow and a 
mule. Got a load of sweet potatoes." The cow and mule were a 
happy combination, and though not a span or a pair, they proliably 
were both "kickers." 

On the 2oth, Gen. Hunter declared martial law in South 
Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The weather was getting decidedly 
warm ; and to relieve the men as much as possible, Col. Jackson 
directed that men coming off guard need not drill on same day. 

Gen. Hunter was getting his spunk up, — and it was said he 
was the sole owner of a large supply of that sort of material : for, 
on the 25th, he peremptorily discharged Mr. Broad, an agent of the 
Quartermaster's Department at Beaufort, for cruelty to negroes, and 
directed the Provost Marshal to see that he went North by first 
vessel. [This order was revoked the 27th. — D. E.] 

On the 26th the order exonerating Private Lewis of Co. I from 
blame in the shooting affair was read on parade. 

Gen. Wright and Staff', with an escort, visited the various posts 
the 26th. 

We had dress parade and services on the 27th. Harrison J. 
Copp of Co. A died at 9.30 p.m., being attended by the Chaplain 
in his last- moments. He was a hospital nurse. 

Gen. Benham, Commanding Northern District, announced on the 
28th, as on his staff': Capt. Fuller, Chief Quartermaster; Capt. 
Elwell, Assistant Quartermaster ; Lieut. Garretson (Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania) , Assistant Quartermaster; J. R. Freeman, Veterinary 
Surgeon ; and directed that all passengers arriving by vessel report 
at his headquarters ; and that when officers apply for leave of absence, 
they shall state the number of officers on duty. 

On the 28th there occurred in the House of Representatives at 
Washington an unusual circumstance. The House had inquired of the 
Secretary of War the reasons why Jacksonville had been evacuated. 
To this he replied : " . . . . The President instructs me to say that 
Jacksonville was evacuated by the orders of the Commanding General 
of that Department, for reasons which it is not deemed compatible 
with the public interest at present to disclose." This was dignified, 
conservative and polite ; but the House was n't used to such replies, 
though before the war closed it had become accustomed to replies 
containing in essence, "It's none of your business." 

A surprise occurred also in our own Department, the same day. 
The blockade runner Isabella, laden with 10,000 Enfield rifles, a lot 
of rifled cannon, and a million dollars in coin, was captured in the 
early morning by our blockading fleet off Charleston, and was sent 
into Hilton Head. 

Col. Jackson was directed (28th) to muster on the 30th the Third 
New Hampshire, a detachment of the Third Rhode Island and of the 
Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania. 

On the 29th our gunboats captured a battery of four guns on 
the mainland opposite Jehossee. 

We were mustered for pay on the 30th and had the usual 
inspection. 



Apr. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 157 



SUPPLEIVLENX. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

Oil the 3d the order providing for recruiting parties (General 
Order 105, Dec. 1861) was revoked and all such parties ordered 
to rejoin their regiments (our party returned 4 May, at Edisto). 
They were also directed to sell the property (flags, office furniture, 
etc.) to best advantage, and take the recruits to their regiments. 
It is apparent that a very hopeful view of war matters was entertained 
at that time by the authorities at Washington : hence the order ; but 
they " took it all back" later. 

The same order provided that Commanding Generals should, 
after a battle, select suitable spots for the decent burial of the dead, 
and place head boards, bearing numbers, and where practicable, the 
names, and keep a register of the same. 

Another order of the War Department (8 April) repeated a 
resolution of Congress giving the President the right to select either 
of two or more officers serving together, and place him in command, 
without regard to seniority. 

Again the War Department (l.")th) declared that no General 
had power to accept the resignation of or even discharge any officer 
appointed by the President. 

On the IGth the War Department directed all paymasters to 
recognize the agents appointed by Governors of States to obtain 
assignments (allotments) of pay for the benefit of families at home. 

On the 2()th the War Department directed that when States 
take care of their wounded or sick, they shall be allowed to commute 
for value of rations at 2o cents per day. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

During April these were not numerous, but were of great 
historical value. 

On the l.'ith (Pulaski taken). Gen. Hunter declared the slaves 
in and about the fort free. 

On the 14th, by General Order 6, Gen. Hunter directed that the 
military post established by the troops under Col. Henry Moore, 
Forty-seventh New York Volunteers, at the Point of Pines on Edisto 
Island, be designated as Fort Edisto. This was under War De- 
partment authority — General Order 24, of 13 March 1862. 



The Department Statistics for April, 1862, are: Total troops, 
21,242; wounded and sick, 4,817; died, 52. Hospital cases: 
wounded, etc., 257; died of wounds, etc., 21. 



158 



THIKD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Apr. '62. 



The Monthly Return shows (Edisto Island, S. C.) : — 
. . . . — men, - otHcevs. 



Field and Start" . . . 

Band 

Co. A 

B 

C 

T) 

E 

F 

G 

H 

I 

K 

Present aggregate 
Aggregate last report . 



3 




3 




8 




9 




3 




3 




3 




3 




3 






954 




9(;o 



Sergeants . . . 
Corporals ... 
Discharged for disability 
Died of disease . 
Killed by accident 
Officers resigned 
Commissioned . 
Absent sick . . 
Present sick . . 
Absent in arrest 



ABCDEFGHI K Totals. 

5 5 5 5 5 5- 5 5 5 5 

7 (S S 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 

10 

10 



000 00010 




3 5 2 9 2 4 10 



110 1 




IVIAY, 1862. 



'AY DAY ! Oh, yes ! but who will go a-maying? Not we, 
surely, for we are soldiers. On the 2d, the Chaplain 
IV \;\rjjfs visited several plantations, and afterward fell into a 
\,A.J^I^ reverie. He says : " I have been sad toda}', in visiting 
(^^^^ the W. E. Seabrook place : a magnificent house and 
garden, making a real paradise. It is perfectly charming; 
but how sad ! Desolate ! injured ! Oh, the horrors of 
war! Dr. Mitchell's place is also beautiful, but sad." 

"There was firing by our gunboats over near Jehossee last 
night," said a diary of the 2d, " but we know not the cause or result." 
Wm. Ladd Dodge of Co. D was detailed on the 2d to act as Sergeant- 
Major, vice Copp, sick. He continued in that capacity till the 7th, 
and then remained at headquarters as clerk till the 12th. 

At dress parade on the 3d the sentences of three men were read, 
one being that of George A. Tarbox of Co. K. (See General Court- 
Martial.) 

On Sunday, the 1th, the recruiting detail sent North on the 
previous January, returned, bringing with them 16 recruits, mostly 
drummer boys, one of whom was the Chaplain's son "Jimmy." 
(See Eecruitiug and Recruits.) 

Mr. Sanborn, the Allotment Commissioner, visited us the 4th ; 
and the Chaplain accompanied him to the other posts and companies. 
It being Sunday, we had services at 5, after which Mr. Sanborn 
talked very pleasantly to us. 

At parade on the 5th an order was read substantially inviting 
volunteers to come forward and accept commissions in the colored 
regiments then forming. As sample items of the coming in of 
negroes, the following entries in a diary are given, though the general 
subject is treated elsewhere: "6th May: About 50 negroes came in 
today. They look sad. 7th May : The old scout came in with a 
dozen negroes and 40 head of cattle." 

We got about 100 head of cattle and sheep on the 6th, which 
assured us fresh meat for awhile. 

Sergt. -Major Copp was able on the 7th to resume his duties. 

We had a general review on the 8th by Gen. Wright, and got a 
mail. Gen. Wright expressed himself as highly pleased with the 
regiment. 



IGO THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3/«v '62. 

An event of national and political importance occnrred on the 
9th, and all embodied in (Jon. Ilnnter's General Order, No. 11, 
declaring the slaves in Sonth Carolina, Georgia and Florida free. 
The order is an important one, and we insert it in full : — 

General Order Xo. 11 : 

Headquarters Department of the South, 

Hilton Head, S. C, 9 May 1862. 
The three States of Georgia, Florida and Sonth Carolina, comprising- 
the Military Department of the South, having deliberately declared tbem- 
.«.elves no longer under the protection of the United States of America; and 
having taken np arms against the said United States, it became a military 
necessity to declare them under martial law on the 20tb day of^ April, LS(;2. 
Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible. The 
persons in these three States — Georgia, Florida and South Carolina — here- 
tofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free. 

David Hunter, 
Edward W. Smith, Major- General Commamh'ni/. 

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General . 

This shook the old ship of State sovereignty and slavery from 
stem to stern. The writer deems it wise to leave this without com- 
ment, as not being material to this history. 

Blackberries have been treated elsewhere ; but we pause for a 
moment to add to the record that on the 9th a very devout man 
recorded this : " Picked four quarts in fifteen minutes." Mail. 

On the 10th the following promotions : 1st Lieut. Emmons, to 
Captain; 2d Lieut. Handerson, to 1st Lieutenant; and Orderly- 
Sergt. Scruton of K to 2d Lieutenant; Private Edgerly of K to 
Orderly-Sergeant. 

The Government Agents were very plenty around our camps on 
the 11th, and, much to our displeasure, they actually carried off our 
sheep. 

THE PLANTER. 

The Confederate steamer Planter was a high-pressure side- 
wheeler, being armed with one 32-pounder and one 24-pounder 
howitzer. Its pilot was Robert Smalls, a colored man ; and the small 
crew was also colored. The Planter was in use in Charleston 
Harbor chiefly, running to Fort Sumter. On the night of the 12th 
of May, 18(12, having then on board four large guns for Fort Ripley, 
some one of the crew in a joking way suggested the surrender of the 
boat to the Yankees. The idea, so oddly expressed, set Robert 
Smalls to thinking ; and after thinking, he acted. He had been the 
pilot of the boat for about six weeks. The circumstances were very 
favorable. The white officers were all on shore. 'Twas easy for the 
crew to get their own families on board. They did so. At 3 next 
morning they started with a head tide. Passing Fort Sumter about 
daylight, they gave the customary signal by steam whistles, and 
passed on, on to beyond the range of Sumter, when the brave pilot 
hoisted a white flag and steered directly for the Federal fleet, first 
arriving at the Aagusta. Capt. Parrot received them, and then put 
on board his Acting Master Watson, and sent the Planter to Com- 
modore DuPont. 



3Iaii '62.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



161 



Congress ou the 19th of May (aud approved, 30th) passed a 
special act, confiscatiug the Planter^ with all the property ou board ; 
to be appraised, one-half to go to Smalls and his comrades. Smalls 
was employed to 

run theP/«//ter in ,_ ^^^==:^2^^--~ ^=-_ 

the Department of _ . — ^^^-^i 
the South, and ^ 
rendered good ser- ^:?,- 
vice. The boys 
of the Third New 
Hampshire have 
been transported 
ou the Planter sev- \ .^ 

eral times. After 
the war, Smalls 
represented his ^^^:^jj 

State (South Caro- ^" 

oliua) in its Seu- ^"' 

ate, aud was after that a Representative to Congress. He was 
convicted of receiving a bribe, though upon (it is said) very slim 
testimony ; and there are many who doubt that Robert Smalls, the 
hero of the Planter, was ever actually guilty of the charge. 




"n^^^rf 



m 



A new movement in drill was mentioned in a diary of the 1 4th 
(probably bayonet exercise) . 

A squad' of meu aud Capt. Clark went over to Jehossee on the 
16th. 

Co. K of the Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania arrived at Bailey's place 
ou the 1 7th [Cos. A, C aud D, Third New Hampshire, there. —D. E.] 

The first real intimation of a move appears under date of the 17th, 
though the subject had been talked about. The hospital was in pro- 
cess of removal that day to the lauding, and troops were arriviug 
daily from Hilton Head : apparently a concentration of troops for an 
onward move toward Charleston. Surplus baggage was sent to 
lauding also, and with it two meu from each company to guard it. 

On Sunday, the 18th, we had services at 5 ; and not long after 
we had a terrific thunder storm. The Chaplain, in commenting on 
the storm, says, "no infant thunder and lightning here." To a 
Third New Hampshire man this comment is sufficient. He will never 
question its accuracy. 

The preparations continued, for ou the 20th it was very gener- 
ally understood that we must pick up aud pack up ; and the process 
was fairly inaugurated, though without specific orders. A monitor 
arrived at Edisto ; aud that fact added to the interest. We were 
substantially ready to go ou the 21st; but the order didn't come, and 
we kept sending otf our surplus as fast as we could spare it to the 
landing. The artillery went to the landing on the night of the 21st, 
and three days' rations were cooked up. We were surely going, but 
where? The oft-repeated question, but of no small import to a 
soldier in a campaign. 



162 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[May '62. 



"We find the Chaplain quite ill for several clays past; but his 
diary {22d) expresses his wish to go with the regiment. 

Gen. Benham (still commanding the Northern District) on the 
23d ordered the creation of a new brigade, under Col. Robert 
Williams (a regular army officer) : the brigade to consist of the New 
York Volunteer Engineers, the Third Rhode Island Artillery, the 
First Massachusetts Cavalry and the Third New Hampshire, and to 
be styled First Division Headquarters Brigade. The order further 
said Col. Terry had been commissioned as Brigadier-General and 
would have command of the First Brigade, consisting of the Seventh 
Connecticut, Forty-sixth New York, Forty-eighth New York and 
Eighth INIaine, with Headquarters at Fort Pulaski. He further ar- 
-^1^ ranged Gen. Wright's Bri- 



gade (Third) as follows : 
Sixth Connecticut, Forty- 
seventh New York, Fifty- 
fifth Pennsylvania and 
Ninety-seventh Pennsylva- 
nia. 

We find the Chaplain at 
work on express matter at the 
landing, for he worked all 
night of the 23d getting it on 
board. 

The weather was rainy on 
the 24th, 25th and 26th, 
whicli probably delayed mat- 
ters more or less. 

On the 28th, knapsacks 
were packed and teamed to 
the landing. On the 29th we were somewhat saddened by the news 
of the loss of the Oriental, with mail and express matter. 

Thermometer 110° only, on the 30th; and all we did that day 
was to sweat and fight mosquitoes. Mail. 

About that time, say 30th and 31st, several men who had been 
on detached duty returned to their companies. Among others we 
find Millett and others of E, Sergt. Moore of F and Perkins and 
Godfrey of D. (Those of Co. D were boatmen.) 

The 31st proved nearly as hot as the 30th. The Chaplain's 
diary says : "Think we shall move soon. Many of our men are sick 
— I hope not with fear." 

The end of May found us on the eve of a move, with only our 
necessary clothing, etc. ; all the rest, including baggage and stores, 
had been sent to the landing. We knew not what the morrow 
might bring forth. 




A C()OI< 



May '62.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



163 



SUPPLEPvIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

A change of method iu recruiting was promulgated the 1st, by 
providing that commanders of armies in the field may request, and 
the Department will authorize, Governors of States to recruit regiments 
then in service. (This didn't work satisfactorily.) 

On the 14th, all leaves of absence to officers were revoked, and 
all were ordered to rejoin their regiments at once. The same order 
directed that prisoners of war should not be dropped from the rolls 
until exchanged or discharged. 



IMPORTANT DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH ORDERS. 

On the 19th, General Order 12 promulgated certain recent acts 
of Congress : Forbidding any military or naval force to be used in 
returning fugitive slaves ; that whoever forced a safeguard should 
suffer death ; repealed the act giving sutlers a lien on soldiers' pay ; 
forbade flogging in the army ; provided that if any officer quit his 
post after resignation, prior to its acceptance, he shall be treated as 
a deserter. 



The Department Statistics for May, 1862, are : Total troops 
16,280 ; sick and wounded, 4,563 ; died 43. Hospital cases : wounded, 
etc., 1")2 ; died of wounds, 1. 



Monthly 


Return 


shows 


(Edisto Is 


Field and 


Staff . 




. —men, 


Band 






. ^ '• 


Co. A . 






. 92 " 


B . 






. 89 " 


C 






95 " 


D . 






. 91 " 


E . 






. 91 " 


F . 






. 90 " 


G . 






. 85 " 


H . 






. 83 " 


I . 






. 82 " 


K . 






. 84 " 



Present aggregate .... 

Aggregate last report . . . 
Gain: 16 recruits (8 musicians, 8 
with (in charge of) the recruiting party, 
A, transferred to Band. 



946 
954 

privates) . These arrived 
Amos D. Baker of Co. 



164 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[3Ia>j '62. 



Changes in officers, etc.: 1st Lient. Elmmons, to Captain 
(from I to G) ; 2d Lieut. Handerson, to 1st Lieutenant (G) ; 1st 
Lieut. Ela, to Captain (from E to K) ; 1st Sergt. Scruton (K) to 2d 
Lieutenant (K) ; 2d Lieut. T. M. Jackson, transferred from K to G. 

ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 

Sergeants 5 5 

Corporals 7 8 

Recruits ...... 31 

Discharged for disaliility 2 7 

Absent in arrest . . 

Recruits required . . C, 9 

Off. absent Avith leave . 1 

Off. absent without leave 

Officers sick ... 2000000000 



5 5 5 


5 5 


5 


5 


5 


00 


8 8 8 


7 7 


8 


8 


8 


00 


1 2 1 


1 4 





2 


1 


16 


1 


2 2 


5 


2 





21 


2 











1 


3 


3 7 7 


8 13 


10 


6 


15 


84 


(Field and Staff 


1-) 






2 











1 





1 




JUNE, 1862. 




■^T LS SAID, " There's nothing like a, day in June." We 
thought so before the month was out ; and that day in 
Juue was the 16th, as will be seen later on. 

On the 1st, Gen. Wright directed our Colonel to 
collect his forces preparatory to marching to wharf, and 
said: "Your command and Maj. Kane's will move to- 
gether. Move as quietly and as secretly as you can, and 
take up line of march at 3 a.m. tomorrow ; but do not move 
till your pickets are all in." These orders did not get "abroad" 
till evening; and hence we were " up in arms " about all night. 

A diary of the last of May said, " several commissions arrived ;" 
and let us see for whom : 1st Lieut. Libby of Co. A to be Adjutant 
(he had not yet returned from leave) ; 1st Sergt. Flanders of Co. 
E to 2d Lieutenant ; 2d Lieut. Langley of Co. H to 1 st Lieutenant ; 
1st Sergt. J. C. Wiggin of Co. G to 2d Lieutenant. 

Promptly at 3 a.m. on the 2d the various companies left their 
several stations, and we united and marched to the landing, bidding 
an affectionate (?) adieu to the native mosquitoes, fleas and 
" minges." Only two halts were made during the eight to ten- 
mile march, as we were not so heavily laden as on a previous occa- 
sion and marching the other way. 

At seven we were at the wharf, and were at once transported 
across to John's Island by the Steamer Planter and others. A diary 
said the force consisted of seven regiments, including cavalry and 
artillery. One very brief account is as follows: "Marched eight 
miles ; hottest day I ever saw ; lots of boys fell out by the roadside ; 
rained hard after we arrived at the Sugar Mills ; we were not allowed 
to go into the buildings, so we tore them down to build shanties ; 
short of rations." 

As this was a remarkably trying day to us, and the scenes in- 
delibly impressed upon the memories of the participants, the writer 
begs leave to give more than one account of it. Another account 
by our Chaplain, is as follows : " Marched, with the thermometer at 
100°, eight miles; many fell out; some fainted and were taken in 
ambulances. The march was terribly severe. AVe reached our 
stopping place at 5 p.m., when hundreds dropped upon the ground 
and slept till morning. Hundreds of overcoats and l)lankets were 
thrown away on the march." 

(165) 



166 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_June 62. 

Another account from the standpoint of a hospital attendant 
was : " About noon embarked on rebel Steamer Planter and crossed 
the river ; began march across John's Island ; very hot ; hundreds 
from different regiments fell out. Had in my charge five gallons of 
whiskey and quinine : gave it very free to the men till gone." 

A little further on will be inserted an account covering the 
march across John's Island (more than one day's doings) . On the 
3d we had a severe storm of wind and rain, and the troops were 
pretty thoroughly drenched. We may fairly assume that it rained 
very hard, as the Chaplain says he found a pint of water in his boots, 
and he was usually very correct. Evidently the storm delaj^ed an on- 
ward movement. 

On the 4th our hospital attendant, who had so kindly disbursed 
the whiskey and quinine, was sent back to Edisto for a fresh supply. 
Gen. Wright arrived in the afternoon and reviewed the troops. A 
diary of that day says, "Our grub arrived and we had two hard- 
tacks apiece." Dyspepsia, begone ! The storm seemed quite in- 
clined to continue, and we had frequent showers throughout tlie day ; 
but it partially cleared by night, and preparations for continuing 
our little journey were made. Orders were issued to move at 2 a.m. 
on the morrow. We were up at 1 on the 5th, and by 2 were on 
the march ; but almost simultaneously the rain fell again. The 
Chaplain^ who was not always serious, said, "•Whether we believe 
in immersion or not, we got it today." He further says he wallied 
nearly all the way (to Legareville), and carried two drums for the 
boys. 

The diary of the quinine and whiskey dispenser says we forded 
a creek waist deep and arrived at Legareville about H a.m. 

The fuller account already referred to is as follows : — 

CROSSING JOHN'S ISLAND. 

On arriving at the landing (Edisto) we were transported across the 
river to John's Island. The day being sultry, the men naturally desired to 
be on deck. This made the steamer top-heavy, and she cai'eened, causing 
an ambulance and several men to slide off into the river (no casualties). 

We landed at John's Island by means of a temporary wharf made of 
barrels and boards, floating in the water. As we had already marched 
eiu:lit miles, Ave were desirous of a rest ; but there was no rest for us. We 
were moved forward again at a rapid pace. Whiskey was given the men to 
enable them to perform the journey ; and many fell to the rear, apparently 
exhausted, for the sake of the whiskey. Consequently a few were very much 
overcome by the relief and could not march. Frequent halts were made, 
and at each I would lie down immediately and rest all I could. A large 
quantity of clothing and blankets were abandoned on this march. Water 
was scarce on the road, and our canteens Avere soon dry. TAventy-five and 
even fifty cents Avere paid for a fcAv swalloAvs of Avater and a hard tack. 
After marching a fcAv miles, many fell out and could not be induced to 
proceed even with a ration of Avhiskey. About the luiddle of the afternoon 
we arrived at the Sugar Mills Plantation, and a halt was ordered. At this 
time I Avas walking like a drunken man, my legs almost refusing to perform 
their office. Only five men of my oavu company Avere actually present to 
hear the command, " Halt I" and this, too, without the aid of whiskey. The 
others joined about dark. At the command, "Halt!" I dropped where I 
stood, unrolled my blanket, and, stretching myself upon it, staid right in 
that spot till next morning, when I arose quite refreshed. Our rations 



Jane'62.'\ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 167 

were gone (consumed), and the teams with fresh supplies fast in tlie mud 
two miles in the rear; but it was said we should undoubtedly have I'ations 
by evening. The Sugar Mill was torn down to obtain boards to build 
shanties, to protect us from an approaching storm. Co. K Avas on picket 
that night and was obliged to go before the arrival of rations. Their 
position was one commanding an approach to a bridge crossing a small 
creek, a mile or more in the rear of the regiment. 

The rains descended and the floods came, and it really seemed as if it 
had never rained before. No one was allowed to lie down or speak aloud, 
and the night was very dark. The experiences of that night of alarm, of 
anxieties, of watchfulness and wakefulness (some sleepiness, of course), 
of doubts and some fears, of mistaken sounds of approach, etc., will never 
be forgotten by Co. K. They were on picket in a strange place, not know- 
ing how near the rebels were, but supposed them dangerously near. 

In the morning. Orderly Sergt. Edgerly and myself were sent into 
camp to hurry up the rations, and found they had not yet arrived. We 
waited, but in vain, nearly all day; and Avhen they did arrive, we were told 
that Co. K was to be immediately ordered in and 'twas of no use to send 
the rations out. Result : Co. K was very, very hungry and very, very cross 
when they arrived ; and Edgerly and myself had to take the censure they 
must bestow on somebody. 

Before the arrival of Co. K a review was ordered, and all were required 
to participate, even to Edgerly and myself. The review was a march over a 
two-mile course. This Avas late in the afternoon. Supper was scarcely 
over Avhen we were ordered to march, the line hurriedly formed, and off we 
went. Tiie recent heavy rain made the marching very bad. 

About midnight, when nothing could be heard save our tramp, tramp, 
tramp, a musket w^s heard, Avhich sounded so suddenly on our ears that it 
brought every man to a halt as if by magic Our speculations Avere sud- 
denly l)rought to an end by the line starting again, as if by one impulse. 
It soon appeared that the tiring Avas purely accidental and by one of our 
OAvn men. 

About tAvo o'clock next morning it began to rain again, and I parted 
with one of my blankets. This I disliked to do, but could carry it only a 
short distance farther at the best, as its Aveight increased rapidly. No one 
except the initiated can understand hoAV fast the rain falls at the South in a 
violent storm. The island being quite Ica'cI, and the roads slightly lower 
than the fields upon either side, the roads Avere soon filled up to a depth 
A^arying from three inches to a foot. At first we endeavored to pick our 
Avay, — that is, divided ranks, — marching on either side of the road to escape 
a large puddle, and then came together again. This caused such a lengthen- 
ing out of the column that the General in command (Wright, I think) 
ordered that the men march elboAV to elboAv, the same as if on parade or 
drill. The rain fell till next day at ten, and before Ave had reached our 
journey's end Ave had marched through puddles one-half a mile in length, 
splash, splash, splash. One creek we forded Avas about three and one-half 
feet deep ; but Avade Ave must, and Avade aa'c did. 

A story is told applying right here, and must be told here to be fully 
appreciated; but whether absolutely true is uncertain. It is to the effect 
that the rebels had planned our capture at this creek ; but Avhen the force 
had reached a point a mile or so aAvay, the commanding oflicer got drunk, 
and did n't get any nearer. Hoav fortunate — for us ! 

Soon after crossing the creek Ave came in sight of the village of 
Legareville, on John's Island and on the left or southAvesterly bank of 
Stono River. D. E. 



On arrival at Legareville we occupied the houses ; for it was 
quite a village, with t\A'o churches, and was Avholly deserted. A 
diary names the distance marched as 15 miles, and says the Third 
New Hampshire took the lead. The same diary also says: "Some 
of the regiment going to James Island today." The day was princi- 



168 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJune '62. 

pally spent in drjnng our clothes, blankets, ammunition, etc. The 
only two matters of excitement were the issue of whiskey rations and 
the shooting of a steer, by Major Bedel, in a door-yard where it had 
taken refuge from a horde of bloodthirsty soldiers. 

The 6th proved a fine day, and we continued the drying processes 
of the day before, and had inspection before dinner. At 2 p.m. we 
were ordered to cross to James Island, and we were transported by 
the steamer Mattano to that memorable island, where the rebels were 
strongly entrenched and where we were destined soon to meet them in 
battle array and spill the first blood of the Third New Hampshire. 
Of that later on. We marched about a mile and halted in a cotton- 
field, then grown up to thistles as high as one's head, where we re- 
mained till next morning, our position being to the left of Gen. 
Stevens' forces, already there. Where were we? What were our 
surroundings ? Was it dangerous to be there ? We were credibly 
informed that we and the rebels were the joint occupants of the 
same island, that the latter were strongly fortified, that James 
Island was the direct and substantially the only path to Charleston, 
that Charleston was only about 8 miles away, that the rebels would 
without doubt interpose objections to our walking right over them or 
even around them ; — in fact, we got a very strong impression that 
these rebels were our enemies. Do you repeat the question, Was 
it dangerous to be there? 

At daylight on the 7th we began to look about. We were 
"all eyes," and every distant object the size of a human was a real 
live reb " for shuah." We were told the rebs were only two miles 
away ; and then we were marched say a mile in the general rebel 
direction. This was getting nearer yet, and nearer, very rapidly. 
In fact, we did see live rebs on picket, and things began to assume 
a realistic hue. We had showers nearly all day. At night we were 
put on picket, relieving the Seventy-ninth New York and Eighth 
Michigan. 

Maj. Bedel was Field Officer of the Day; and having orders to 
drive the rebels, by a dash, from a certain house, he made the dash, 
having Co. E, Captain Plimpton, for the dashing party, with Cos. C, 
D and K as support. They were to dash forward rapidly, at a sig- 
nal which was given ; but, as the rebels beat a hasty retreat, there 
was little else to do than occupy the house. 

While the regiment stood in line of battle that night, during a 
heavy thunder shower, we were treated to a terrific sample of thunder- 
bolt lightning, or to a sample of terrific thunderbolts — we were un- 
able to determiue which it was. For the moment we were blinded 
by the excessively white light and deafened by the meteoric explo- 
sions. The next moment we were in a darkness that could almost be 
felt, and every man instinctively desired to feel the "touch of elbow " 
to be assured he was not alone. Language cannot describe the 
event. Some of us thought it an attack of the enemy, and that what 
we saw and heard were shells. Experience with shells, later, gave 
us a knowledge and familiarity with them that enabled some men, so 
it is said, to smell them from a long distance ; and one diary even 
goes so far as to mention " shell fever," whatever that may mean. 



June '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 169 

After this little episode, those who could got into the sheds and 
corn cribs, etc., for such shelter as might be obtained. The corn crib 
was an educator ; for it taught us to not suppose we were the sole 
occupants, though apparently we were. The other tenants were 
there on a permanent lease. 

The morning of the <Sth found us quite near the rebels ; and our 
aim now was to draw their fire and thus discover the location of 
their batteries. Maj. Bedel was again directed to make a dash, 
having this time Co. C, Capt. Donohoe, for the dashers ; and away 
they went, about the middle of the afternoon, supported by Cos. E 
and I and a squad of the First Massachusetts Cavalrj^ The rebels 
got our range during the day and had sent us a fewcomplimentaries. 
Several prisoners were captured by our force in this dash : one 
account says, "four rebel pickets;" and another says, "ten 
prisoners." On the return of the dashing party the rebels followed 
so closely that Cos. H and F were temporarily placed behind a dike 
and on the left of Co. C. Co. C soon found it was impracticable 
to remain. The Third New Hampshire was relieved at that time by 
other troops, who were advanced to hold the line ; and we were 
ordered to our brigade (Williams') at Grimball's Plantation, which 
was to the left (inland) and bordering on the Stono River. There 
w^e quartered in and about the negro cabins till our tents arrived 
from Edisto. 

Another account of the day says, " Quiet this morning; signs 
of an attack. At 2 p.m. they opened on our post. Several regi- 
ments were called, and we were advanced with artillery and cavalry. 
The enemy's shot and shell struck all around us, and finally became 
so heavy we withdrew. Several men were killed and others wounded. 
None of ours (Third New Hampshire) hurt. The rebs shelled us 
through the day and night, with little effect." 

At this early part of the Avar, things of very small moment — 
later — were of great import. For instance: On 8 June, 1<S6"2, we 
saw Sumter for the first time ; and the rebels were seen by us in 
force, and they actually threw shells at us. Later many rebels threw 
many shells, and the diaries were not disturbed by pen or pencil. 

The rebels shelled us nearly all day of the 9th, having gotten our 
range. Our gunboats, under whose guns we were, replied. More 
troops landed the 9th, also siege guns, and we saw preparations for 
building a battery. We were called the night of the 8th, and went 
about two miles, where we did valiant service by sitting down and 
staying right there till 2 p.m. of the 9th, when we kindly permitted 
the Sixth Connecticut to sit in our places. The firing by the enemy 
was continued on the 10th until about 3 p.m. At that hour our 
pickets were attacked by a Georgia regiment. The firing lasted 
about two hours, the batteries and gunboats participating. The 
Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania and Forty-seventh New York lost a few 
killed and wounded, and seven rebels were taken prisoners. 

Three companies of the Fourth New Hampshire arrived the 10th. 
Our Maj. Bedel seemed to be roving around ; for he was present when 
the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania (Col. Guss) was attacked and ren- 



170 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJvne '62. 

dered temporary assistance. One of the prisoners captured was Capt. 
Williams of the Forty-seventh Georgia. On the 10th, Gen. Wright 
issued a general order (No. 22), establishing the hours for the 
various calls, and upon its promulgation we drew the inference that 
we had come to stay. 

A JAMES ISLAND INCIDENT. 

Our rations again came short, and we hnnted cattle. Short wo)k was 
made of a victim. In many instances the fresh meat tlius obtained was 
eaten ere it had time to cool. I, with others, shot a heifer; and while they 
were skinning her 1 cut pieces and threw them on the fire, singeing them 
slightly and quickly on the coals ; and in less time than it requires to state 
particulars the meat was eaten, and without salt. 'Twas sufficient that 
I Avas hungry and needed food. After a little we became more deliber- 
ate, as our hunger was appeased, and piit strips of the carcass on our tin 
plates and let them "sizzle" on the coals, throwing in a little salt Avater 
in place of salt. This we dipped from the Stono, where our gunboats and 
transports lay and where we all bathed. 

The day following I was hungry again ; and late in the afternoon, while 
hunting for cattle, we sighted a sheep, and chased it over a mile before 
it yielded its precious life a sacrifice to a soldier's appetite. While on 
the chase, I, being more weary than my companions, sat down to refresh 
myself. While thus sitting, I spied a "hard tack" lying upon the ground, 
which from its appearance had been cast aside by its once fortunate pos- 
sessor. It Avas burnt in the baking, to be sure; but it was a "hard tack," 
and I was hungry. Proud mortal that I was, I picked it up covertly and 
temporarily hid it. Being covered with bhishes (/. e., the soldier — not 
the hard tack), I nibbled it unseen, as occasion ottered. Was it sweet? 
Did I act as if I had stolen a sheep? Yes, to both questions. D. E. 



The Chaplain's diary of the 11th has this: "By request of 
Gen. Beuham, I went with the Chaplain of the Forty-seventh New 
York on the field of yesterday, to get the number of the dead, etc. 
Found 14 bodies of the rebels, and others must have been removed 
by their friends. Two of the rebels taken yesterday died of wounds 
last evening." 

Our tents and baggage were being loaded the 11th, at Edisto, 
on the Steamer Burnside. F. L. Otis of Co. I was mentioned in a 
diary of the 11th as wounded — the first in the regiment. He was 
hit by a spent ball during the evening. We turned out about 2 a.m. 
and went to the rifle pits, where we staid till after dinner. 

Our advance was attacked on the 12th, late in the afternoon, 
after a slow fire of all day, but gained no advantage. After this 
little diversion, they shelled the camps. Our baggage arrived (12th) 
from Edisto, and glad were we to get our tents, our knapsacks and 
our Sunday clothes. The Hospital Department (regimental) arrived 
on the same steamer (^Burnside) . 

The 13th was an unusually fine day, and apparently one favora- 
ble to planting ; for that operation was applied to several siege guns 
during the day. Late in the afternoon, the rebels again opened with 
their guns and shelled us slowly all night. Apparently Gen. Wright 
was in command that day, for he issued an order, forbidding the 
cutting of bushes near or walking upon the parapets of recently 
constructed intrenchments. 



Ji,nr'62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 171 

Our hospital was established the 13th, in some negro houses 
(Griniball's plantation). The diary of a man who came up from 
Edisto with the baggage says : "I find we have got into a dangerous 
place; the rebel shells burst near our camp." We were forbidden 
by Gen. Benham's order, repeated by Wright, to bathe in the rivei- 
between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. — for sanitary reasons, of course. We 
got paid off the 13th. for two months (privates, $26.00). 

The regiment turned out early on the 14th, to escort a heavy 
gun, pretty well out to the front, to a battery in process of erection. 
Both sides were busy as bees, getting ready to kill each other. Two 
rebel deserters were brought in, who stated the force to be 12,000 
on the island. An order of the 14th, by Gen. Wright, appointed 
Capt. Van Brunt, Forty-seventh New York, Provost Marshal, and 
directed Col. Chatfield, Commanding First Brigade, First Division, 
to detail a company from his brigade for Provost Guard. The same 
day, a diary shows that one of our mounted guns replied to the 
rebels. This must have caused them to take a new interest in us. 

Capt. Carleton (poor fellow, so soon to die!) received from 
Capt. Emmons on the loth, .$101.02, the balance of the Company 
Fund on hand. (As he arrived on the 10th, it is probable that he 
assumed command of his Co. (I) on next day, relieving Capt. 
Emmons ; but returns show as above.) 

The day was rainy, but the preparations for battle went for- 
ward. Emmons returned to Co. G (from I), relieving Handerson 
from command of the company. James Chase of Co. F was 
wounded in the leg by a rebel picket. Sixty rounds issued. It 
really looked like war, and we were actually told that we were to 
pitch in at daylight on the morrow. Some of us may have expressed 
ourselves previously as in a dreadful hurry to get to Charleston ; but 
an order (or an equivalent) to march is quite another thing. Some 
of us were exceedingly thoughtful about that time. Capts. Plimpton 
and Randlett, with a small squad, went out I'econnoitring along 
toward night. They were fired at (Chase wounded) and the two 
captains with their squads got separated, Capt. Plimpton getting 
back to his base first. The regiment was relieved from duty during 
the day and moved its quarters nearer the woods. 

"Two A.M. tomorrow," was the word passed from mouth to 
mouth. We little knew what that meant ; but we learned by a sad, 
sad lesson, as the reader will presently see. Four companies of the 
regiment were on picket the night of the 15th, under Capt. Clark. 
The men were posted as far to the front as was possible, that we 
might be near the enemy, for various reasons. So great was the 
desire to be well advanced that some of our men actually found 
themselves posted on the wrong side of the rebels ; but this was 
remedied at the earliest possible moment, let the reader be assured. 



BATTLE OF JAMES ISLAND. 

We have now arrived at a point in this history where a tale of 
blood is to be related — the first blood of the Third New Hampshire. 
The event was so important to us who participated that the writer is 
fain to believe it will be so to others, and hence will give more than 
one account of it. 



172 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[June '62. 



One brief account says: "16 June 1862: Relieved from 
picket at 4 a.m., and took place in regiment [as it marched 

along. — D. E.], and we then proceeded, etc got back to 

camp 10 A.M.," etc. 

Another account says: "Attacked the rebels in their fort at 
5 this morning. The fight was most severe, and after four hours 
our men withdrew, having, of killed, wounded and missing, 780 in 
all : 104 in Third New Hampshire. Our men displayed unparalleled 
bravery, often fighting after being severel}^ Avounded." 

Another says : "Turned out at 2 a. m marched toward 

the woods .... the division was got into line and then started 
for rebel battery. The Third Rhode Island went ahead as skir- 
mishers. The Third 



^^t^'^^^''J ^^m^ 



^y'^LW ^^ 



\ T'N""^ 



RTARS 




Secessionui\U 



New Hampshire went 
up to the left of the reb- 
el battery and waited 
while Stevens' Brigade 
attacked the front. He 
made several charges — 
repulsed. Our regiment 
was then ordered for- 
ward to charge on the 
left. They went as far 
as they could. I fol- 
lowed as far as I could 
with the ambulance, and 
then sent the litters 
forward to convey the 
wounded to the ambu- 
lance. I went forward 
to superintend the bring- 
ing off of the wounded. 
Was surprised to find 
our regiment had been 
checked by a creek. 
They halted, fired, 
silenced the fort. The Third Rhode 



June. 16, \SCZ 



picked off the gunners, ete 
Island drove back the enemy and prevented their flanking us, and 
let us out. Dr. Eaton worked very hard. Dr. Moulton was away 
sick. Returned to camp at 10 a.m. ; everybody dissatisfied. The 
Hospital Department was alive, caring for the wounded in every 
possible manner. A general hospital for all the Avounded of all 
regiments was made in a large cotton house. I worked till mid- 
night. The night was cold and stormy. The scenes of that night I 
shall never forget. L. N. J." 

The regiment is said to have entered the fight with 26 officers 
and 597 men. Result: 104 to 107 killed, wounded and missing. 
The Third Rhode Island hod 5 companies there : B, E, F, H and K, 
under Maj. Metcalf ; the skirmishers, B, F and K, under Maj. Sisson. 

The Third New Hampshire went into the fight left in front, by 
flank, and then by a right flank movement faced the enemy by the 
proper regimental front. 



June '62. -] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 173 

When Gen. Hunter heard of this battle, he considered it a dis- 
obedience of orders on the part of Gen. Benham ; and he at once 
relieved him of his command, and directed him to report to the AVar 
Department at Washington. Gen. Benham explained that his or- 
ders were to " maintain his camp," and that he could not do so with- 
out silencing the enemy ; and it was solely for this purpose the as- 
sault was made. The military storm raised by the controversy 
which followed is too voluminous for insertion here, and is not perti- 
nent to this history. 

Another account says : — 
.... We (Co. K) were posted before dark (lytli). No sleep Avas 
allowed thatnif^ht; but ere the next sun had reached the meridian, many 
slept the sleep that linows no wakinjr. Ere dayli<rht appeared, Ave Avere or- 
dered to fall in and march by the left flank to join our regiment 

AVe soon found the regiment ia an open field. Daylight now appeared, and 
Ave could see that quite a large force Avas at hand. All surplus blankets, 
great coats, etc., Avere ordered to be left i)ehind. and each regiment made a 
pile of its own, leaving a squad Avith each. "ForAvard, Third NeAv Hamp- 
shire ! " greeted our ears, and on Ave Avent rapidly. 

The particular battle of Avhich I am about to Avrite, Avas the one in 
Avhich Gen. Benham got himself into trouble Avith the general commanding 
the Dei)artment. It Avas said that Gen. Benham's orders AAere to simply 
gain a foothold and hold it : not making any aggressive moA'ements, but to 
protect himscir if attacked. 

Gen. Benham Avas in command of the district in which James Island 
was located. He took the responsibility to order the attack, though it is 
stated he Avas not upon the ground to superintend the movements. The 
command of the attacking party .... devolved upon Col. Rol)ert Williams, 
of the First Massachusetts Cavalry and an Acting Brigadier-General. 

But to the battle itself. I do not remember Avho our brigade com- 
mander Avas, but think it Avas Acting Brig.-Gen. Terry, Colonel of the 
Seventh Connecticut. On our march to the scene of conflict. Col. Serrell of 
the NeAV York Engineers rode past us. saying, " Well, boys, there is a hot 
breakfast for you: four or five apiece for you, perhaps." At this time the 
attacking party had begun their Avork, and the cracking of the nuiskets aa^s 
equal to the noise of many drums. This Avas ncAV music for us — that is, 
taken in connection Avith a battle; and Ave aAvaited further orders. The 
gunboats uoav began to shell at long range, and mostly by guess, as a mile 
or more of Avoodland intervened. These shells struck as often among Fed- 
erals as Rebels. Stevens' Brigade made the attack on the rig-ht and AAere 
repulsed Avith great slaughter. The scene Avas an exciting one, and, being 
onr first fight, it Avill be remembered the more distinctly hy those AA'ho par- 
ticipated. The gallant Stevens led " his Highlanders " thrice to the cannon's 
mouth, and was thrice repulsed by the force of grape, canister and bullets 
which Avere literally shoAvered upon him from the battery. Soon Ave Avere 
ordered in to support an attacking party on the left. We moved rapidly 
forward; but no regiment appearing for us to support, Ave moved up and be- 
gan an attack ourselves. We marched in by the left flank, left in front, so 
that in order to attack the command Avas, '-By the right flank, double 
quick! " etc. Just before this command Avas given, we received a shot from 
a masked battery on our left, Avhich was aimed at our colors, and took eftect 
upon our Color-Bearer, Corporal James Cassidy of Co. K. striking him in 
the head Avith a fragment of shell or a bullet, cutting the scalp, but not 
penetrating the brain. He Avas immediately relieved by another member of 
the color-guard, Avho bore the colors through the fight." The shot Avas sup- 
posed at first to come from one of our light batteries, and an accidental one ; 
but as shot foUoAved shot, Ave decided that the rebels must have a hand in it, 
and that rebels Avere all around us. At the command " By the right flank ! " 
etc., Ave rushed forAvard with a cheer and a shout Avhich doubtless made the 
rebels think Ave Avere determined to come right in and take possession. 



174 THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. \_June'62. 

Our expectation was cut short by arriving on the bank of a deep and 
muddy creek between us and the besieged fort. Beyond this creek, and be- 
tween it and tlie fort, was a muddy marsh that was impassable. No sooner 
had we halted on the bank of this creek than we opened a hot fiie on the 
garrison of the fort, with telling effect. The gunners were driven from 
their guns, and the men could be seen running helter skelter for protection 
from the leaden hail. Our batteries poured in their solid shot and shell, 
cutting down trees, demolishing bai'racks and dismounting guns. 

By referring to the plan (made al)out 1SG6, from memory alone) a fur- 
ther description may be followed. The masked battery (/) continued to 
fire at us (d) at short intervals during the flght, which lasted, so far as we 
were concerned, about an hour and a quarter. We had no sooner got to 
firing rapidly than we were saluted by shot and shell from a battery to our 
left and rear (a). Nearly every shot fired went over our heads and struck on 
the muddy marsh. A pufl' of smoke from the direction of the battery caused 
many of us to " duck." At least one of those " ducks" saved material dam- 
age to the writer. A comrade, at close of battle, laughed heartily at a sug- 
gestion which he said the writer originated during the fight, to the effect 
that as we were too near for effective service, and no rebels were in sight, 
that we elevate our pieces sufficiently to drop the bullets within the fort. 
This was at a time, so the comrade said, when we Avere simply firing at the 
barracks to keep busy. 

After the fiaht had lasted nearly an hour, reinforcements were seen 
hurrying from the direction of Charleston (6). They (apparently two regi- 
ments) were soon within the fort and opened so hot a fire that there seemed 
to be no alt-ernative for us except to retire from a field we were unable to 
make further advance upon. Oar regiment had been entirely alone all this 
time. Upon retiring from the field our need of support was quite apparent. 
From the masked battery (/) there came out a force of about two regiments 
to fiank us. This would have been easily accomplished, except for the op- 
portune approach of a part of the Third Rhode Island, which arrived just in 
the nick of time and, charging the rebels, drove them back and let us out. 
The shrieks of the wounded, the groans of the dying and the mangled dead 
we will not attempt to describe. We had to leave a few gallant fellows 
upon the field, and we were informed later that these were stripped of their 
valuables and the major part of their clothing soon after our retireihent. 
Capt. Carlton of Co. I, poor fellow, was mortally wounded, and died the 
same day. [See his personal.] His case excited a deal of sympathy. He 
was conveyed past lis on an old door, mangled and dying. We had never 
seen such before. His white face contrasted strangely with his jet black 
hair and flowing beard. As we retired, the yells of victory and defiance 
from the rebel battery were met by our throwing back defiance in their 
teeth. 

The fight seemed on the whole to have been a poorly-managed one, as 
the forces were apparently put in in " small lots," at intervals, and this too 
with reserves (2, 3) lying back, ready for the order which did not come. 
After falling back a short distance, we were halted ; and then followed a 
sharp artillery fire, participated in by our gunboats on the Stono. We Avere 
soon after this in camp, and our first baptism in blood was on record 

D E. 



THE OFFICIAL REPORT OF THE BATTLE. 

Headquarteus Third Rkgimknt N. H. Vols. 
James Island, S. C, 19 June 1862. 
To Acting Brig. -Gen. Robert Williams. 

Sir : I have the honor to present the following report. On the morn- 
ing of the 16th instant, I received orders to form the six companies of my 
regiment remaining in camp, — four companies being on picket, — and fall 
in in the rear of the Rhode Island Third, which I did at three o'clock. 

After the line had been formed a short time, I received orders to march 
forAvard. When I came up Avith our pickets, I Avas joined by the remaining 



jHne'62.] THIRD NEW HAMrSIIIRE REGIMENT. 175 

four companies of my regiment. I soon received orders to again advance, 
which I did till I reached some wooden buildings near the enemy's earth- 
works : and as I had then got in advance of those I was ordered to support, 
I halted ray command and waited for further orders. Orders soon came 
for me to move on and support the advance. Thinking I had made some 
mistake, and that there was some of our forces in advance, I threw forward 
my two flanl< companies as skirmishers, under cover of some shanties that 
were very near the earthAvorks and gave them a tine opportunity to operate 
against the enemy. Co. A was commanded by Capt. Clark, and Co. E l)y 1st 
Lieut. Maxwell. I then moved the remainder of the regiment to within 
forty yai-ds of the side of the earthworks, and opened fire, driving there- 
from the gunners from three guns, which appeared to me to be facing the 
southwest. I found there was no artillery facing the side I was on, and it 
would have been very easy for me to have gone into the fort, provided I 
could have crossed a stream between me and the earthworks, about twenty 
yards In width, with apparently four or five feet of Avater, and the mud 
very soft: the men therefore could not cross. After getting into this 
position, the enemy soon opened on me from a battery that was aliout two 
hundred yards in our rear, throwing grape into the ranks, from which we 
suffered severely. In a short time they opened tire with rifles and infantry; 
at the same time a battery about a mile north of us opened on us with 
round shot and shell, one shot from which killed a captain and a non- 
commissioned officer. Yet the men stood all these fires, and ot)eyed orders 
promptly. There soon appeared on our left a body of the enemy, forming 
in three battalions, in Avliich form they marched to reinforce the earth- 
work in front of us. During this time I had informed the General of our 
position and of the above mentioned reinforcement. 

At this time the Rhode Island Third made an attack on the forr-e in my 
rear, materially assisting me in my position. Meanwhile the reinforce- 
ments of the enemy had come in range of our fire, and I opened fire on them 
with good efl'ect; but they Avere so Avell covered that they succeeded in 
throwing a portion of the force into the fort. There, being Avell covered, 
their fire on us was very severe, and detracted our fire from the re- 
inforcements and gave them an opportunity to throAv them all into the fort. 
Their number Avas so lai-ge Ave could not cope Avith them to any advantage ; 
and by this time the other batteries, both in our rear and the one at the 
north of us, opened afresh on us, Avith more effect than ever. Some of my 
men by this time had fired over fifty rounds, and many of the guns Avere 
very foul; some even having to shoot aAvay their rammers, being unable to 
draAv them. 

Finding at this time that I Avas far in advance of all our forces, and 
seeing some of the forces retiring from the field, and as it appeared of no 
advantage to hold my position any longer, I gave the order to retire, Avhich 
the regiment did in good order, to the old building from Avhich Ave started. 
I soon received orders to fall back to the rear of some of our forces, and 
in a short time after reaching that position, orders to return to camp. 

All my command, Avith one exception, behaA'ed so Avell that it is hard 
to discriminate in favor of any few; but a number of cases coming under 
my personal observation, I Avill take this opportunity to mention them: 
The field officers — Maj. Bedel, Acting Lieutenant-Colonel ; Capt. Plimpton, 
Acting Major — rendered me great assistance, coolly performing all their 
duties and encouraging officers and men by their example. Adjt. Libby and 
Sergt.-Maj. Copp rendered me great assistance. The Adjutant Avas several 
times much exposed in carrying orders, but came out of the fight unscarred. 
Of the Captains, I Avould particularly mention for meritorious conduct 
Capt. Donohoe of Co. C, and Capt. Wilbur of Co. B, and Capt Randlett of 
Co. F. His (Capt. Donohoe's) company Avas stationed on the left, and 
received the first fire of the enemy's reinforcements, Avhich Avounded his 
Lieutenant and Orderly Sergeant and many of his men. Captain Wilbur, 
with his company, Avas next in line and muf h exposed to the enemy's fire. 
He AA^as cool and continually encouraging his men. Captain Randlett's com- 
pany was under severe fire, during Avhich the Captain kept his men in order 
and set them a good example. 1st Lieut. Handerson, commanding Co. G, 



176 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. lJune'62. 

was in position near Co C, and handled his company flinely, Avitli tlie assist- 
ance of 2d Lieut. Cody, detailed from Co. C to assist him. Lieut. Cody 
was shot througli the thigli, and Lieut. Handerson was shot in tlie arm. 
Capt. Dow of Co. H, altliougli he carried his company on to the field in 
good shape, behaved very imprudently while there, making remarks about 
the impossibility of our sustaining our position, and the impropriety of our 
remaining in that position : all this in the hearing of his men ; discouraging 
the men and taking their attention from the enemy in front of us. 

Among the non-commissioned officers and privates Avho ;ire Avorthy of 
special mention are Orderly Sergeants Libby of Co. B, Donohoe of Co. C, 
Hawkins of Co. I, and Trickeyof Co. G, who came under my personal 
observation; also, 2d Sergt. Campbell of Co. K. Capt. Clark of Co. A 
reports that 1st Sergt. Houghton deserves mention for the faithful manner 
in which he performed his duty on that day; but my space will not allow 
me to mention all Avho are worthy of mention for their good conduct. 

We went into the fight with 2G officers and 597 enlisted men; and 104 
were killed and Avounded. Surgeon Moulton Avas absent from the regiment 
from Sunday morning, the 15th instant, until Wednesday morning, the 18th, 
without my consent ; and therefore the Avhole duty of the Hospital depart- 
ment devolved upon Asst. Surgeon B. F. Eaton, AAho faithfully performed 
his duties to the sick and Avounded soldiers. 

With great respect, this report is respectfully submitted. 

John H. Jackson, 
Lieut.-Col. Commanding Third N. II. Vols. 



Headquarters Hilton Head, 10 July 18G2. 
To His Excellency the Governor of Neav Hampshire. 

AYr .■ I have the honor to enclose hercAvith the official report of Lieut.- 
Col. John H. Jackson, of the Third New Hampshire Volunteers, concerning 
the part taken by his regiment in the battle of Secessionville, on James 
Island, S. C, on the 16th of June, Avith the list of killed, Avounded and 
missing of the regiment on that day. As no doubt your Excellency Avill 
haA'e seen the official report of the commanding General before this reaches 
you, I shall not attempt to give you au account of the battle. The Third 
kegiment Avas ordered to the position on the side of the marsh of which 
Col. Jackson speaks, and Avas kept in that position as long as possible, 
for the purpose of keeping down the fire of the Avork and coA'ering Gen. 
Stevens' second advance. So well did they do this that the enemy could 
not man their guns on Gen. Stevens' side, and he Avas enabled Avithout loss 
to bring up his regiment to within four hundred yards of the work, ready 
for the assault, Avhen the order Avas given to retire. 

With deep regret for the many men Avho have fallen and Avith their 
families, I desire to express to your Excellency my admiration of the ex- 
treme bravery, discipline and soldierly conduct of the ofticers and men of 
the Third Regiment. I do not believe it possible for men to have acted 
Avith more courage; and I desire particularly to call the attention of your 
Excellency to the marked gallantry of Lieut.-Col. Jackson, Maj. Bedel and 
Capt. Plimpton. Their conduct Avas noticed even by the enemy, as it Avas 
afterAvards stated at a flag of truce. 

Surgeon Moulton's absence Avas, in the first place, by my permission. 
His being absent at the time of the battle was caused by an accident, and I 
attach no blame Avhatever to him for it. I have ahvays found him prompt 
and eagerly attentive to his duties. 

With great respect I am, very respectfully. 

Your obedient servant, 

Robert Williams, 
Col. First Mass. Cav., Commanding Post. 



Jane'G2.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. ]77 

SECESSIONVILLE. 

Judge Cowley, iu his book, "Leaves from a Lawyer's Life: 
Afloat aud Ashore," says the Confederate loss was 207 and the 
Uuiou loss GOO. He further says: "This assault on Secessionville 
was made by Gen. Benham, in violation of the instructions of Gen. 
Hunter, and against the advice of Generals Stevens and Wright. 
Had the same force assaulted these works a month earlier, when 
Robert Smalls brought the information of Gen. Pemberton's designs, 
the result might have been different." Again he says: "The bat- 
tle of Secessionville has been shamefullj^ slighted by compilers of 
histories. Harper's work .... devotes but a few lines .... 
John S. C. Abbott and many others omit to notice it at all ... . 
Greeley aud the Count of Paris .... tell the storj' briefly. 
Lossiug's account is one of inferior merit." 

Union Forces: First Brigade (the advance), Col. Wm. W. 
Fenton : Eighth Michigan, Lieut. -Col. Graves ; Seventh Connecticut, 
Lieut. -Col. J. R. Hawley ; Ticenty-eighth JIassachusetts, Lieut. -Col. 
M. Moore. Second Brigade (the support). Col. Daniel Leasure : 
Seventy-ninth Xeir York, Lieut. -Col. Morrison; One Hundredth 
PennsyJrania, Maj. D. A. Leckey ; Forty-sixth New York, Col. 
Rudolph Rosa. The storming party consisted of two companies of 
the Eighth Michigan, Capts. Ely and Doj'le, and one company of the 
Neiv York Engineers, Capt. Sears. These three companies were 
supported by Capt. Rockwell's Connecticut Light Battery and Capt. 
S. M. Sargent's company of the First Massachusetts Cavcdry. 

Confederate Forces : The District of James Island had been 
reinforced to 2,000 men on the day before, all under Gen. N. G. 
Evans ; and the battery of Secessionville was under the immediate 
command of Col. T. G. Lamar of the First South Carolina Artillery. 

The battery was protected by abattis, a 7-foot ditch and a 
9 -foot parapet. 

The Count of Paris says: "They advanced with the bayonet 
without firing a shot, and had already passed the last hedge, situated 
some 500 yards from the work, before its defenders had become 
aware of their approach. Col. Lamar had scarcely collected a few 
men, and fired his siege gun once, when the assailants were already 
in the ditch. One of the most sanguinary close combats was engaged 
on the parapet itself. It was 5 a.m., hot, foggy, damp; and the 
combatants were soon enveloped in a dense smoke. The boldest 
among the Federals had penetrated into the intrenchments, and 
planted on them the flag of the Eighth Michigan ; but they could 
not capture the redoubt, the guns of which, loaded with grape, 
swept the summit of the ridge and opened several gaps in the regi- 
ments which Stevens had sent to their assistance." 

Gen. Stevens says that Col. Fenton threw the Eighth Michigan 
as far to the right as possible, and used ever}- effort to bring on, in 
support, the Seventh Connecticut and Twenty-eighth Massachusetts ; 
but the terrible fire of grape aud musketry cut the two former regi- 
ments in twain, the right going to the right, and the left to the left, 



178 THIRD NEAV HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [June '02. 

whither finally the whole of the Twenty-eighth Massachusetts took 
its position, where they were joined, with scarcely an interval of 
time, by the One Hundredth Pennsylvania and Forty-sixth New 
York, of Col. Leasure's brigade. These regiments had been brought 
up with promptness and energy by Col. Leasure, and the right of 
the One Hundredth Pennsylvania had pushed up to and joined the 
Seventy-ninth in their charge. 

The gunboats Ellen, and Hale., when the tide was sutliciently 
high, got near enough to deliver shot and shell at and over the fort ; 
but their fire could not be accurate, woods intervening. 



CONFEDERATE ACCOUNT. 

A third time the enemy formed by line and advanced in a last desperate 
effort to ijain the battery; but in vain. The assailants had reached the 
ditch, and some of them succeeded in mounting the embankment; but they 

paid for their rashness w'ith their lives On tlie west side of the 

battery, the attacli was more serious. [Tlie Third New Hampshire Avas 
mistaken for the Seventy-ninth, Highlanders. — D. E.] The famous Seventy- 
ninth New York took up a position so as to enfilade our guns, and kept up 
a constant and effective lire of musketry to drive off our gunners. They 
were met by tlie Charleston Battalion and the Eutaw regiment. For a time 
the fight was desperate; but the Louisiana Battalion, under Lieut.-Col. 
McHenry, came up at the critical moment in gallant style; and the repulse 
of the Highlanders [Third New Hampshire] Avas no longer doubtful. The 
enemy Vi'as for the last time forced back with great slaughter, and the day 
was Avon. — Charleston Ilercun/. 



Sl^CESSIONVILLE. 

FouT SuAiTER, 18 June 18G2. 
.... Though on a small scale, this Avar furnishes not one instance 
of a more gallant charge on the part of the enemy .... The battery Avas 
contested on the ramparts .... hand to hand .... and a log rolled from 
the top to sweep the enemy .... a dense Avood separates our army from 
the enemy .... Secessionville is a very important point on the creek that 
divides Morris from James Island and constitutes our extreme left flank, 
and if taken, the enemy could turn our left .... the enemy's force is 
estimated at 9,000 .... Fort Sumter is about three miles from Secession- 
ville .... The stream is only navigable for very small boats,' and only at 
high tides .... Their object is to take James Island and plant mortar 
batteries — Confederate Letter. 

SECESSIONAaLLE, JaMES ISLAND. 

• 2 June 18(;2 : A gunboat came up Folly River. Shelled battery at 
Legare's Point and Secessionville. Evening : More than tAventy vesf^els off 
the coast. 

3 June 18G2 : Enemy and small party of our men lay near each other 
all night at Legare's. Engaged enemy; driven back half a mile. Troops 
said to be TAventy-eighth Massachusetts and One Hundredth Pennsylvania. 

6 June 18G2: Brig. -Gen. W. D. Smith arrived and took command at 
James Island, relieving Gen. Mercer, ordered to Savannah. Skirmished 
with enemy this evening near Presbyterian church. 

7 June 1862 : Alarm in evening. Troops to front. Enemy moving 
about at Grimball's. 

10 June 18(52 : Reconnoissance. We were repulsed. 

14 June 1862 : Brig. -Gen. N. G. Evans arrived and took conmiand of 
James Island. 

16 June 1862 ; Attack by enemy at daylight on earthwork at 
Secessionville. We had four guns and 600 men. The fire of the enemy 



June '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 179 

was terribly severe, particularly so his fire on our risjlit flank from across 
the creek at Hill's. [This was the Third New Hampshire.] Our battery 
was almost silenced at one time by this latter Are. The reinforcements, 
under Col. IIa2;ood, rushed in with the cry, "Remember Butler I" Several of 
the enemy mounted our ramparts. — Gonfederate Biary. 



The New Yo7-k Herald of the 28 June 1862, gives the following 
account:" .... the command of Brig. -Gen. Williams, consisting 
of the Third New Hampshire, .... a battalion of the Third Rhode 
Island acting as infantry, the New York Engineers and the First 
Massachusetts Cavalry, marched from Grimball's Plantation at early 
dawn, and was pushed forward toward the southerly face of the 
work, while Gen. Stevens Avas directing his forces against the side 
which faced the east. These regiments were separated from Gen. 
Stevens' line of attack by an impassable swamp and stream. The 
Third New Hampshire was in the advance, followed by the Third Rhode 
Island, and supported by Capt. Ransom's Battery of regular artillery 
and Day's Battery: the two latter under Capt. Hamilton, Cliief of 
Artillery. As the infantry above uientioned marched up with the 
evident purpose of turning the right of the fort, they found them- 
selves cut off from the work by the marsh and exposed to grape and 
canister on their right, together with a galling fire from the rebel 
riflemen concealed in the woods on their left. Under this shower of 
deadly missiles, both the Third New Hampshire and the Third 
Rhode Island were badly cut up ; yet they continued to fight in 
good order, until the sharpshooters had them silenced .... this 
brigade fought with great valor and maintained their ground against 
terrible odds till the order to withdraw .... among the killed 
.... Third New Hampshire .... Capt. Carlton .... hit by 
a shell .... brought to hospital living, and survived an amputa- 
tion, for which he earnestly plead, against the protests of the 
surgeon, a little more than an hour. Lieuts. Cody, Henderson [Hau- 
derson], Nealy [Allen] and Stauton [Scruton], wounded .... 
troops never fought with more steadiness and determination and 
bravery than our men did yesterday." 

The Century's War Book gives losses, etc., at Secessionville : 
Union loss, G83, of whom 529 were in Stevens' Brigade. Confederate 
loss, 200. The Confederates were commanded by Gen. N. G. 
Evans. Stevens' Division had about 3,500 men, and Wright's 
Division, about 3,100 men. 

For our part in the Secessionville fight, the State of New 
Hampshire very kindly took occasion to thank us (see State of New 
Hampshire, grouped) . 

The remainder of the day was passed in caring for the wounded 
and in taking extra precautions as to the distribution of the troops, 
so as to guard effectively against an attack ; for it was to be pre- 
sumed that the enemy, elated by his success, might undertake to 
drive us from the island by a coup de main. Sad, indeed, were we 
who were uninjured, though grateful for that fact. Every company, 
and almost every tent, was in mourning ; for scarcely a group of 
friends was left untouched. 



180 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJum -62. 

The 17th dawned upon us. At Charlestown, Mass., the day was 
a celebrated oue, ditto at Charleston, S. C. ; but how vastly different, 
yet both for victory in battle. The wounded were being sent to 
Hilton Head, to the General Hosi)ital, where they might be better 
cai'ed for. 

The Chaplain's diary says : " The day has been spent in caring 
for the wounded and dying. I have done all I could. My heart is 
sick. The day has been stormy and sad." 

Dr. Eaton, the only surgeon on duty in our regiment, did nobly, 
working hard and long and making no complaint. He went into 
the real work of his position with his coat off and sleeves rolled up. 



SECESSIONVILLE. 

(NEXT DAY.) 

Lieut. Holbrook of Gen. Stevens' staft' was with flag of truce 
next morning, burying the dead. He relates that the Confederates 
were also engaged in the same sad duty, but did not have a flag of 
truce. That as our men were about to place an apparently dead 
Confederate in an already prepared grave, they were considerably 
surprised to see the man's eyes open slowly, whereupon the grave 
proceedings suddenly ceased. He was gently raised up, and ottered 
a drink of whiskey from the officer's canteen. He had just strength 
enough to decline and whisper a few words. After repeating the 
words several times, they were found to be, "You drink first." In 
this he was gratified, and then tasted the liquor himself. He soon 
after revived so far as to state that his officers had told him, if the 
Yankees got him they would poison him. He was terribly wounded 
in the breast, but survived and was sent to our hospital (a cotton 
house) on James Island. What became of him is unknown. The 
name, Lieut. Holbrook thinks, was Henry B. Gardner, and he 
belonged to the South Carolina Battalion. 

The burying of the dead occupied parts of the 17th and 18th. 
On the 18th, more of the wounded were placed on board the Steamer 
Ben Deford. Gen. Benham issued a congratulatory order, the 18th, 
about the battle and concluding as follows: "We need only say in 
conclusion what we know we all feel : We have met, we have 
examined the works of the enemy, and they shall be ours." This 
order must have been issued before Gen. Benham got his order of 
removal from Gen. Hunter. This order was No. 16, and the Head- 
quarters was then Stono River ; so it is quite fair to assume that he 
was then on a gunboat. 

Cos. I), K and others went on picket the night of the 18th, and 
Capt. Dunbar resigned and Lieut. Ayer was granted a forty days' 
leave of absence, both on account of ill health. Neither of them 
were in the fight of the 16th. Lieut. -Col. Jackson was Field Officer 
of the Day, the 18th. An official report of the 18th, by the Brigade 
Surgeon, says the Third New Hampshire had 105 killed, wounded and 
missing ; total for brigade, 600. 

On the 19th, we find the men passing in their money to the 
Chaplain to be sent North. A story is told of the Chaplain's sitting 



Jnne '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 181 

on a large box containino- tlie packages, having one eye on the 
steamer at the wharf, and tlie other watching the shells as they 
occasionally came near, his anxiety being in the direction of safety 
to the money, and speculating on the chances of getting away with 
it in case of a coiqj de mam by our neighborly neighbors. The 
Ben Deford sailed the 19th for Hilton Head, with about 300 wounded 
on board. The wounded men were in charge of Medical Director 
Dalton, Surgeon Snow of the New York Engineers, Surgeon Holland 
of the First Massachusetts Cavalry, Surgeon McDonald of the 
Seventy-ninth New York, and Surgeon Townsend of the Forty- 
seventh New York. Pvverything was done for the comfort of the 
men possible to be done under the circumstances. 

It looked a little as if we might stay on the island ; for on the 
r.)th Gen. Wright appointed Lieut. Geo. Metcalf, Third Rhode Island, 
as Ordnance Officer. Gen. Benham had not yet got his walking 
papers, for he issued another order on the 19th from his gunboat 
headquarters, forbidding the men who came off guard firing off their 
pieces in the direction of the Stono River. Our picket detail was 
relieved by the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania. • 

Orders were received on the -iOth for the entire force to with- 
draw and proceed to Hilton Head. Somebody, name unknown to 
the writer, was taking pictures the 20th. Might have been a spy. 
Mail. 

A 21st diary says: "We sent flag of truce today, and they 
report 45 of our men prisoners, and several more were buried by 
the rebels." Another change the 21st in our military matters. 
Gen. Wright was ordered to and assumed command of all the 
forces on James Island and at Legareville, making of these forces 
two divisions : the First to be composed of the present Second 
Division and to be commanded by Gen. Stevens; the Second to 
be composed of the present First Division and the Headquarters 
Brigade except the New York Engineers, to be commanded by Gen. 
Robert AVilliams. The Headquarters Brigade to be discontinued ; 
the Third New Hampshire and Third Rhode Island to be assigned 
to the Second Brigade, and the New York Engineers and the First 
Massachusetts Cavalry to be unattached ; the Engineers to General 
Headquarters and the First Massachusetts Cavalry to the Second 
Division. 

The Staff to be as follows : — 

Col. Edward W. Serrell .... Chief Engineer. 

Lieut. -Col. Graves, Eighth Maine . A. A. Adjt.-Gen. 

Surgeon Hambell . . " Medical Director. 

Capt. Hamilton Chief of Artillery. 

Capt. Foster Asst. Adjt.-Gen. 

Capt. Goodrich Chief Quartermaster. 

Lieut. Bryant, Seventh Connecticut, Chief Commissary Subsisteuce. 

Capt. Rice Vol. Aide and A. A. Adjt.-Gen. 

Capt. Sampson Volunteer Aide. 

Lieut. Hayden Aide-de-Carap. 

Lieut. H. \V. Hubbard Aide-de-Camp. 

An order of the 21st showed Col. Welch to be in command of 
the Second Brigade, Second Division. A Department order granted 



182 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. lJune'62. 

60 days' leave from the 23d iust. to Lieut. T. M. Jacksou, and 
same exactly to Lieut. D. K. Serutou, the latter being directed, at 
expiration, to report to Headquarters Department of the South. 
[Lieut. Scruton was with the dead at that date. See his Personal — 
D. E.] 

Gen. Hunter on the 21st countermanded his order dividing 
the Department into Districts (this order relieved Beuham), and 
announced Maj. Charles G. Halpiue (Miles O'Reilly), Asst. Adju- 
tant-General. 

Most of the men who went to Hilton Head with the wounded 
returned on the 22d, and sad were the tales they told. Some of 
the unfortunates died on the passage. Mail. Services. 

The diary of a clerk at Headquarters says: " We [Third New 
Hampshire] are in the Second Brigade, Second Division, under Col. 
Welch. Maxwell in command of D. Capts. Dunbar and Dow 
resigned and gone home." The changes brought about by the resig- 
nations and recent leaves of absence were numerous, and several 
promotions were made on the 2od. 

Inasmuch as there was some work done on the intrenchments 
the 23d, we were a little uncertain whether we were to stay and 
work our way to Charleston or abandon the island. 

Gen. Williams (23d) appointed Lieut. Stevens, the Quarter- 
master of the Third Rhode Island, to position of Division Commis- 
sary of the Second Division. 

On the 24th, Gen. Williams issued a congratulatory order on 
the behavior of the Third New Hampshire, Third Rhode Island and 
Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania on the 16 th inst. There were heavy 
details at work on the intrenchments. Some rebel deserters came 
in (24th) and said they had 20,000 troops on the l()th, while they 
estimated ours at 8,000. Mortars were being planted, designed to 
throw a shell of 224 lbs. (so says a diary), and preparations were 
being otherwise made for another fight. Gen. Wright ordered 
(24th) the assembling of a general court-martial on the 25th, and 
Capt. Clark of our regiment was one of the detail. 

On the morning of the 2oth, one of our gunboats moved up 
the Stono and shelled a rebel battery. AVe heard heavy firing in 
the direction of Sumter. Gen. Wright '(25th) directed a muster 
and inspection to take place on the 30th, each commanding officer 
of a regiment or detachment to muster his own men. 

Col. Welch, Commanding our brigade, ordered trees to be 
planted to shade the camp sentinels. The remainder of our men 
who went to Hilton Head as attendants upon the wounded returned 
25th. The weather continued excessively hot. Our pickets on duty 
night of 24th reported they were somewhat disturbed by the rebels 
beating the long roll. Col. Williams was serenaded night of 25th 
by the bands of Third New Hampshire and Sixth Connecticut. Our 
pickets were exchanging shots nearly all night the 25th. 

Our Colonel, E. Q. Fellows, on leave of absence, was honora- 
bly discharged by a Department order of the 26th. An attack was 
expected same day and the pickets were having a lively time. 



June '62.1, THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 183 

Several of our regiment who had been left at Edisto (sick, etc.) 
arrived on the 27th. Capt. Wilbur of Co. B was having a little 
unpleasantness in his company, for a diary of the 27th says, "All 
the corpoi'als are in the ranks except one." The Ericsson arrived 
at New York 27th, with 57 w^ounded from James Island fight, under 
charge of Surgeons Craven and Scholl. Lieut. T. M. Jackson (on 
sick leave), Lieut. Allen (wounded) and Dr. Moulton's wife and 
child on same steamer ; also three privates, w^ounded, from Third 
New Hampshire. The batteries of the rebels sent us a large num- 
ber of shells 27th. Our batteries were progressing slowly toward 
completion. The men were fast becoming sick. Fort Sumter fired 
a few shots night of 27th. 

An evacuation order was received on the 28th. A diary says, 
" This is the only sensible thing done since we left Edisto." Prepa- 
rations to leave now fully occupied our men. A man on picket 
(Co. K) says he climbed a tree and saw the whole line of rebels and 
their works, P'ort Sumter, and the steeples of Charleston. The 
cavalry began to move on the 2i)th, and had nearly all left the 
island by nightfall. The 29th being Sunday and a very large 
number of the regiment on picket, we had no services, though we 
indulged in dress parade and prayers. Mail. 

The uuister and inspection took place on the 30th as ordered ; 
but, oh, how we missed our wounded and dead comrades, who had 
at previous musters answered to their names ! Our regiment got its 
orders the 30th to pack up. Everything in confusion. The sick 
in hospitals were ordered to be sent to Legareville. Several lots 
of money had been sent home by express of late, and our Chap- 
lain secured another lot 30th and sent it away. 



SUPPLENIENX. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 59, 5 June, directed the establishment of a 
Camp of Instruction for 50,000 men at Annapolis, Md., for cavalry, 
artillery and infantry, and assigned Maj.-Gen. Wool to its com- 
mand, ill addition to his duties as Department Commander. Brig.- 
Gen. L. P. Graham to be Chief of Cavalry, and Brevet Brig. -Gen. 
Harvey Brown to be Chief of Artillery. The Chief of Infautry to 
be hereafter designated. The Chief of Ordnance, the Quartermaster- 
General, the Commissary-General, the Surgeon-General and the 
Paymaster-General to designate suitable regular officers to represent 
their several Departments. The troops to be called the "Reserve 
Corps de Arme^." 

General Order 60, on the 6th, directed the immediate and un- 
conditional release of any and every medical officer then in our 
hands as prisoners, it being an established principle (rule of war) 
that such officers should not be so held. 



184 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [^.Jiine '62. 

The same order restored the Yokmteer Recruiting Service, aud 
the parties to be made up of invalid aud disabled officers in prefer- 
ence to others. 

The same order directed a special return to be made of all the 
arms to the Chief of Ordnance, giving the number, kind, condition, 
length of service, etc. 

The next day, by General Order 61, all officers absent with 
leave were ordered to report to their regiments within 15 days. 
The invalids aud wouuded may, in the East, report at Annapolis, 
Camp of Instruction ; w^hile the AVesteru officers may report to Camp 
Chase, Ohio. 

On the 20th, by General Order 70, it was ordered that no offi- 
cer should draw pay when away from his company, except he be on 
leave or detached with troops. 

And next day, by General Order 71, it was provided that where 
persons were taken in arms, and were tried and sentenced to death, 
the penalty should not be carried out till approved by the President. 

On the 28th, by General Order 72, it was directed that no more 
furloughs be granted to paroled men, and revoked all such in exist- 
ence, the men holding them to report at once to the various con- 
venient places named (Annapolis, for the East) . 



IMPORTANT ORDER, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 
The Districts of the Department abolished, 21st. 



Department Statistics for June, 1862, are : Total troops, 16,336 ; 
wounded and sick, 4,602 ; died, 124; hospital cases, wounded, etc., 
407 ; died of wounds, etc., 47. 



The Monthly Return shows (James Island, S. C.) : — 

Field and StafT — men, - officers. 

Band — " 

Co. A 9:i " 3 " 

B 89 " 3 " 

C 91 " 3 " 

D 88 " 2 " 

E 88 " 3 " 

F 89 " 3 " 

G 84 " 3 " 

H 81 " 2 " 

I 77 " 2 " 

K 88 " 3 " 

Present aggregate 92.j 

Aggregate last report . . . 947 

Losses — killed in action (16th) : C, 3 ; D, 1 ; H, 2 ; I, 1 ; K, 1 : total. 

Died of wounds received in action : C, 1 ; F, 1 ; I, 1 : total, 3. 
Died of disease: I, 1 (Corpl. Young). 
Discharged for disability: D, 2; E, 2 : total, 4. 



June '62.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 185 



OFFICERS CHANGES. 

Resigned: Col. E. Q. Fellows, Capt. Robert C. Dow, Lieut. W. H. 
Cornelius. 

Promotions: 2d Lieut. J. F. Langley, to 1st Lieutenant ; 1st Sergt. J. 
C. Wiggins (G), to 2d Lieutenant; 1st Sergt. D. J. Flanders (E). to 2d 
Lieutenant; 1st Lieut. A. H. Libbj', to Adjutant. 

Officers wounded: 1st Lieut"! R. H. Allen, 2d Lieut. Walter Cody, 2d 
Lieut. D. K. Scrutou. 

Officers killed in action: Capt. Ralph Carlton. 

1st Lieut. Maxwell transferred from Co. H to Co. E. 



ABCDEFGH I K Totals. 

Sergeants 5 5 o 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 

Corporals 7 1 « 8 8 8 8 7 8 8 

Musicians 2 122222222 

Absent sick 8 16 18 13 15 12 23 17 21 8 151 

Absent in arrest ... 1 2 1 1 1 1 7 

Officers absent Avitli leave 0100010 01 3 

Prisoners of war ... 1 1 2 

The fact that B has only one corporal requires explanation. 
There was some sort of internal disturbance in the company, — some 
were reduced ; and others resigned, under the impression that they 
were materially assisting those reduced and who were supposed to 
have been wronged in some way, — beyond the province of the 
writer to inquire into. 

The extraordinary showing is the result of the fight of the 16th, 
on James Island, sometimes called "James Island" and sometimes 
" Secessionville." 




JULY, 1862. 




^H] 



K first day of that summer month was an exceed ingl}' 
bns}^ one at James Island. A Confederate diarj- says : 
"A salute all along the line at sunrise, and also at Forls 
5/1 Johnson, Moultrie and Sumter, in honor of our recent 
successes before Richmond." An evening postscript 
says: ''Enemy suspected to be about to retire from the 
island." This salute was mentioned in several diaries; but 
the Confederate alone gave the solution. The Third New 
Hampshire managed to get on board the Cosmopolitan during the 
evening, though it had a picket detail on duty at the extreme front. 
Our hospital and its baggage wore put on board the Buniside. A 
Department order of the 1st repeated an order from Washington 
that thereafter no officer should be granted more than 20 days' leave. 
Cos. A, C and E were on picket, and Co. E was relieved quite late at 
night. The embarking place was at Grim ball's, from a temporai-y 
wharf built by the Engineers. During the embarkation of our 
regiment. Col. Williams and the Captain of the Cosmojjolitan had 
some unpleasantness, and Col. AVilliams ordered the Captain under 
arrest. That delayed matters for awhile, as the steamer was being 
moved about and was not at that moment made fast to the wharf. 
We lay about the decks and gangways, — in fact anywhere and every- 
where, — waiting for sailing orders; and more or less anxiety was 
felt as to whether the rebels might not attack us at the critical 
moment. 

Early on the morning of the 2d we cast off and started for 
Hilton Head, stopping at Legareville till about noon, and arriving 
at Hilton Head before dark ; and landing, went into camp on a new 
spot, a little distance in rear of the General Hospital and within 
the intrenchments. Companies A and C reached us the next day, 
having been on picket, and therefore the last to leave the (James) 
island. Mail. No tents first night. 

So soon as we could on the 3d, we visited the General Hospital 
to see such of our friends as had not been sent North ; and glad 
they were to see us. The day was principally occupied in pitching 
tents and getting our camp into shape. 

(187) 



188 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [July '62. 

HOSPITAL DATA. 

I was ordered to the General Hospital. My teiitraates again assisted 
me, carrying- all of my baggage .... Evening found me an inmate of the 
U. S. General Hospital at Hilton Head. This was my first entrance into a 
hospital as a patient. A nice, clean bed was provided for my use, next to a 
window where I could enjoy a breeze. The hospital was bviilt on the 
hollow square plan, with piazza on both sides. The following plan will 
give a fair idea of its shape and arrangement : — 



□ 



J 
(k 



/ 


F 


K 


y 
L 
G 

\ 








A 




C 






H 




H 




A. Wash House. 

C. Cook House. 

D. Dead House. 

E. Office of Surgeon-in-Gharqe : 

Dr. J. E. Semple. 
H. Dispensarij. 



E. Dining Hall for Convalescents. 
G. Covered Driveways. 
J, K, L, M, N, 0. Wards. 
B. Towards Fort Wells. 
P. Front to sea. 



The plan shows the arrangement of beds by Avards. The single dot 
shows the location of the writer's bed. 

The bedsteads were of iron. The wards were each in charge of a 
surgeon, whose duty it Avas to visit his patients daily, prescribing for each 
according to his necessities. Fleas were quite numerous — in fact, largely 
outnumbered the patients. It was my usual custom to go through the 
following programme each night : Take off the coverlid and sheets, shake 
both vigorously, rearrange them on the 1)ed, brush my hands up and down 
my legs as high as the knees, jump into bed, pull up the mosquito net from 
the floor, tuck it in and bid the fleas good night. This looks like a long 
process ; but it Avas n't. The brushing Avas to rid myself of the fleas 
gathered during my standing on the floor. Meals were brought to such as 
were unable to go to the dining hall. The Avards Avere long and airy, and 
the building was within a fcAV rods of the shore. The capacity was, I think, 
about 700 .... After settling down as a patient, my thoughts ran home- 
Avard, and I deliberated as to whether it Avas my duty to actually inform 
my anxious mother that her son was sick and in a hospital. I reflected 
that it Avonld be but a few Aveeks at farthest Avhen I should leave the 
hospital, and decided not to unduly alarm her, but Avithhold the information 
until after my dischai'ge from the hospital. I dated my letter as if Avith 
my company and regiment, Avhich Avas, in fact, not half a mile away, in rear 
of the hospital. My comrades visited me almost daily, performing little 
acts of kindness that I shall never forget. Patients were forbidden to eat 
anything prepared outside the hospital; but need I say that forbidden 
fruit was sweet, etc.? So soon as I was able to walk about I made daily 
trips to "the fort": /. e. headquarters of the post, where the pirate 



JaJij '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 189 

sutler abounds, and soon became the agent of mj' ward in purchasing those 
forbidden fruits, etc. M3' Yankee desire to trade was superior to cold 
rules, and a peep underneath my bedding would have discovered pens, ink, 
paper, envelopes, condensed milk, etc. 

I must sell something, even if it only be an envelope with a stamp 
•'onto it" for five cents, this figure being a sort of minimum price for 
anything in the Department. No sooner had my company and regiment 
gone (see elsewhere) than I became uneasy and my recovery was very 
rapid. A comrade from my own company (K), named Charles Gammon, 
readily agreed with me that our recovery should at once be accelerated ; 
and by exercising the greatest care and scrupulous attention to our in- 
creasing health, Ave were enabled to obtain a discharge about the 22d 
July and rejoined our company on Pinckney Island, where it was on duty 
with Co. II. We stopped at Seabrook with Co. G over night, as our Aveary 
march of say six or eight miles had completely exhausted us. We were 
really unfit to travel a mile. As for myself, it Avas a long time before I 
Avas able to do duty. D. E. 



The Fourth of July dav»'ned upon us under peculiar eircuni- 
stanees. The following extract from the Chaplaiu'.s diary tells the 
story completely: " . . . . this the Fourth of July; and Ave, dri\'en 
back from James Island, have no songs to sing, no powder to burn, 
no cheers to giA'e, no festivities to engage in ; but in quiet sadness 
the troops have kept the day, moaning OA'er loss and defeat." 

On that day Gen. (Col.) Williams, under a Department Order, 
assumed command of the Post of Hilton Head ; and one of his first 
orders directed that two companies of Third New Hampshire proceed 
to Seabrook (Hilton Head) and relicA^e two companies of Eighth 
Maine, then stationed at Seabrook and Pinckney, reporting to Col. 
Bea\'er, then at Graham's, Commanding the Pickets. In response 
to this, Cos. G and H were sent, G stopping at Seabrook, and H 
crossing to Pinckney Island. 

A gill of whiskey apiece was the only attempt to celebrate the 
glorious Fourth. It naturallj'^ followed that there were several 
individual celebrations, but no general movement. Our regimental 
hospital was gotten into shape on the 5th, so as to begin receiving 
patients. 

On the 6th, Gen. Williams directed Capt. Van Brunt to re- 
lieve Capt. Wayne as Acting ProA'ost Marshal, and that two com- 
panies of the Third New Hampshire be detached for special duty as 
Provost Guard at Headquarters, Hilton Head, the two companies to 
be selected by Col. Jackson. Col. Jackson selected Cos. A and I, 
and they moved to their new quarters and new duties, relieA'ing two 
companies of the SeA'^enty -sixth Pennsyh^ania. ScA'eral carpenters 
Avere detailed that day, six from our regiment, to report to the Chief 
Quartermaster for duty. The six Avere Corpl. Smith of D, Corpl. 
Bryant of B, Privates Gale and Colby of K, Emerson of F and 
O'Brien of C. These two items looked like staying at Hilton Head. 
Mail. Services. The Chaplain visited the General Hospital and dis- 
tributed tracts and books, and out of respect for our dead he visited 
our little cemetery. The thermometer registered 100° on the 7th, and 
the men were fast getting sick, in many cases probably the dcA'elop- 
ment of what was contracted at James Island. The regiment was 
being divided up, for sanitary reasons, and placed upon different 



190 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [J>iJ>/'62. 

posts and plantations. With the exception of Cos. A and I (on 
Provost), it was reported that we were to do picket duty on and near 
Skull Creek. Two companies (G and H) had already gone to their 
stations. "•The regimental hospital is to be at Stoney's Plantation," 
said a diary. 

, On the 8th there was a review, Cos. B, C, D, Fu, F and K being 
the only companies present in the line. 

Gen. Hunter, on the 9th, directed regimental commanders to 
detail two commissioned officers and four non-coms, or privates 
to go North for recruits. Under this order the following were sent 
from Third New Hampshire : Lieut. W. H. Cornelius, of D ; Lieut.. 
Henry S. Dow, of I ; Sergt. F. A. Dunn, of B; Corpl. J. W. Brown, 
of K; Corpl. J. Ackerman, of F; Private Albion Moulton, of G. 

The same order convened a Medical Board (Brigade Surgeons 
Dalton, Craven and Crispell) to examine and report upon cases 
where officers had applied for sick leave, and the Board to state 
whether in their opinion the leave desired was "necessary to save life 
or prevent permanent disability." Co. F and the Hospital went to 
Stoney's the i)th, the latter under Dr. Eaton. The best and largest 
(the planter's) .house was selected for the Hospital. Co. F went to 
Braddock's Point, and Co. B went to Graham's Plantation. A Co. 
B diary says : " ' Honey Horn' is a nice plantation ; about 100 head 
of negroes ; not much duty — only two posts. The mansion is occupied 
by Lieut.-Col. Jackson, Maj. Bedel, Capt. Plimpton (Acting Major), 
and Lieut. (Adjutant) Libby. We live in our tents. It is quite hot. 
The band occupies one of the buildings. Plenty green corn and 
potatoes." 

LOCATIONS. 
Cos. A and I : on provost guard, Hilton Head. 

Headquarters, Commissary, Quartermaster, Rand and Co. B : at Graham's. 
Co. C : at Spanish Wells. 
Co. D : at Pope's. 
Co. E : at Braddock's Point. 

Co. F and Hospital: at Stoney's, " Honey Horn." 
Co. G : at Seabroolv. 
Co. H : at Pinclvney Island. 
Co. K : at Pinckney Island, thence (later) to Jenkins' Island. 

On the 10th, our Chaplain, who had been unable as yet to get 
away, owing to pressure of duties, recorded in his diary: "News 
reached us of McClellan's retreat at Richmond, and that 10,000 
men had been ordered there from here. We are ordered to move 
nothing more until further orders. A sad day this." Another 
diary of that day says: "Hospital not yet moved, on account of 
troops being ordered North, and the Third New Hampshire may be 
sent. Mosquitoes thick at Stoney." 

The thermometer registered 88° during the day of the 11th and 
80° at night. Stevens' Brigade started for Fort Monroe. The 
Chaplain went up to Graham's that day, but owing to the order 
had not moved his quarters. 

The President, on the 12th, approved a joint resolution of 
Congress authorizing medals of honor to enlisted men. [This has 



Juli/'62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 191 

no counection whatever with the medals bestowed by Gilhnore at 
Morris Island, in 1.SG8. — D. E.] The paying off of the regiment 
began the 12th. 

We had no services on the 13th (we were scattered), but did 
have a mail. The latter was taken to the different companies by the 
Chaplain^ its distribution occupying about three days. 

No item of 14th except the paying off. 

Corpl. Marshall of Co. A died in the hospital on the loth, from 
amputation of leg. He was wounded at the James Island fight. 

Thermometer 10(i° in the shade on the 16th. While the Chaplain 
was distributing the mail, he collected money to be sent North. 

Gen. Hunter on the 17th revoked his order authorizing extra 
issue of coffee to men on guard during night. Edisto Island was 
evacuated and the troops began to arrive that day at Hilton Head, 
and a part of them at least were to go North. Gen. Hunter was 
petitioned, the same day, by several officers of Third New Hampshire, 
to be sent North to McClellan. Thermometer 103" the 17th. Troops 
embarked for the North. The Forty-fifth Pennsylvania was one of 
the regiments. 

Gen. Williams directed, on the 18th, that no passes be recog- 
nized by our pickets unless signed by Gen. Hunter and countersigned 
by the Post Adjutant. 

On the l'.)th it appeared certain we were not to go North, as the 
Chaplain moved to Pope's Plantation, and said he had comfortable 
quarters in a plnnter's mansion ; around him the scenery was fine, 
and fig and orange trees were plenty. 

The hospital was moved to Stoney's on the 20th. 

Thermometer on the 21st was 100°, and averaged 90° for six- 
teen hours, and 80° for the other eight hours. AVas n't it hot ! Whew ! 

A general court-martial convened at Hilton Head on the 22d. 

The recruiting party went North on the 24th, on the steamer 
Swan (see 9th). Co. K removed from Pinckney Island to Jenkins' 
Island the same day. 

Nothing further of note occurred during the month, save that on 
the 31st, 1st Sergt. J. C. Dunbar of Co. D received his discharge; 
and a diary says, "he left for America." This was a direct insult 
to South Carolina and ought to have been resented. [J. C. D. 
actually went home Aug. 4. — D. E.] 




192 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \Ju1ji '62. 



SUPPLEMLENTT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 74, dated 7th, provided that $2 premium be paid 
to any citizen, non-com. or soldier for each accepted recruit 
for the regular army he may bring to the rendezvous. And any 
soldier who hereafter enlists either in regular or volunteer force for 
three years or during the war, may receive first month's pay in ad- 
vance, upon the muster-in of his company or after he has been mus- 
tered and joined a regiment already in the service. For volunteer 
recruits for old regiments, $3 premium ; for volunteer recruits for 
new regiments, $2 premium. The premium may be paid the recruit 
himself or the party bringing hun in. During the continuance of the 
existing war, $25 of the $100 bounty previously authorized by Con- 
gress will be paid to every recruit, volunteer or regular, and as 
follows : To volunteer for old regiment, when inspected and mustered. 
To volunteer for new regiment, when their companies are organized 
and mustered. 

'Twas ordered on the 8th that Governors of States should 
appoint a 2d lieutenant for each company (of a regiment in process 
of formation), to be mustered in at the outset and he to muster in 
the men as fast as they enlist. 

On the 11th, by Genera! Order 77 (really an act of Congress), 
it was provided that the Secretary of War be authorized to commute 
the rations of coffee and sugar, for the extract of coffee, combined 
with milk and sugar, to be procured in same manner as preserved 
meats, pickles, butter and dessicated vegetables are procured for the 
navy, if conducive to health, is not more expensive and is acceptable 
to the men. 

The same order provided that General Order 74 shall be so 
construed as to allow the first $25 bounty to be paid at enlistment. 

General Order 78 directed that furloughs to enlisted men be 
discontinued, on account of the many evils arising therefrom. The 
order also provided for the transportation of sick and wounded from 
distant hospitals to other hospitals in or near their respective States. 

An Order of the 15th (No. 79) provided that in case of a 
soldier's death, the money due him should be paid as follows : 1. To 
his widow, if any. 2. To his children, equally. 3. If resident in the 
United States, to his father ; or, if he has abandoned the family or 
be dead, then to his mother ; and next, to brothers and sisters 
(if they are residents of the United States). 

On the 23d, by General Order 85 (really a resolution of 
Congress), it was directed that clothing lost by the casualties of war 
should be replaced without expense, to all sick, wounded and other 
soldiers who have lost such. 

The recruiting measure was to be tried again, on the old basis 
(General Order 105, Dec. 1861) ; for on the 25th, by General 
Order 88, it Avas provided that thereafter a recruiting detail from each 




Col. Enoch Q. Fellows. 




Col. John H. Jackson. 



Col. Johx Bkdel. 



Juhj '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 193 

volunteer regiment in the field should be two officers and one non- 
com, or private from each company (General Order 105 of 
1861 being amended bj'this). Recruits for regiments then in the 
field to be permitted to select the company they prefer, unless already 
full. This order also provided that all men (anywhere) who desired, 
might, singly or in squads, join any particular regiment or company 
in the field, and when enlisted might be paid the bounty allowed and 
then mustered and sent to the general depot for the State or district. 

Another order of the 26th directed that all Chaplains held as 
prisoners of war be at once unconditionally released. 

Again, on the 29th (Act of Congress promulgated), it was or- 
dered that — 

Rear Admirals should rank with Major-Generals. 

Commodores " " " Brigadier-Generals. 

Captains " '• " Colonels. 

Commanders '• '• " Lieutenant-Colonels. 

Lieutenant-Commanders " " " Majors. 

Lieutenants " " " Captains. 

Masters " " " 1st Lieutenants. 

Ensigns " •' " 2d Lieutenants. 

General Order 91, of the 29th (under a resolution of Congress), 
directed the President to cause 2,000 medals to be struck off, to be 
awarded to such non-coms, or privates as should most distinguish 
themselves by their gallantry in action and other soldier-like quali- 
ties, during the present insurrection. 

On the 31st, by General Order 92, it was ordered by the Presi- 
dent that on Monday, 1 1 August next, all leaves of absence and fur- 
loughs, by whomsoever granted (except those by the War Depart- 
ment), be absolutely revoked and annulled. All were ordered to 
their regiments at once, and only the following excuses would be 
accepted : 1. The order of leave by the War Department. 2. Disa- 
bility from wounds received in the service. 3. Disabilit}^ from disease 
that rendered the party unfit for military service. But any officer or 
private who could visit watering places (!), places of amusement 
( !), or walk about the town, would not be excused. 

The same order provided for a special muster on the ISth of 
August, at 10 A.M. [Note that this allowed a week for absent ones 
to reach their regiments. — D. E.] The order directed that three 
lists be made of the absentees, and shall be made within 48 hours 
after the muster and forwarded. All who are then absent, who are 
fit for duty, will be regarded as absent without cause, their pay will 
be stopped, and they dismissed from the service, or treated as de- 
serters unless restored. No officer to be restored except by a Court 
of Inquiry appointed by the President. For the accommodation (?) 
of these absentees, the Secretary of War was directed to appoint a 
commissioner for each state, and to authorize the U. S. Marshals, 
mayors, chiefs of police, sheriffs, postmasters and justices of the 
peace, to hunt up those absentees, at five dollars per head if cap- 
tured and turned over to some military officer. (The Administration 
was in earnest.) 



194 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[./«/// '62. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

1 Jul}^ : No leaves to be granted to officers, except when neces- 
sar}' to save life or prevent permanent disabilit}' : in such cases, 20 
days will be granted. The Board .convened under above order con- 
sisted of Brigade Surgeons Dalton, Craven and Crispell. 

General Order 22, of the 17th, revoked a previous order, allow- 
ing extra coffee to men on guard during the night. 



Department Statistics for July, 1862, are : Total troops, 14,203 ; 
wounded and sick, 3,804; died, 46; hospital cases, wounded, etc., 
134 ; died of wounds, etc., 2. 

The Monthly Return shows (Hilton Head and Pinckney Island) : 

officers. 



Field ai 
Band 


d Staff . . . 


. . — men, 


- 


Co. A 




. . 89 " 


3 


B 




. . 86 " 




c 




. . 87 " 


2 


J) 




. . 85 " 




E 




. S7 " 


3 


F 




S(! " 


3 


G 




. • 81 " 


3 


• H 




79 " 


1 


I 




70 " 


2 


K 




. . 80 " 


3 


Present 


aggregate . . 







Aggregate last report .... 925 

Dischargeel by sentence of General Court-martial : C, 2. 

Capt. M. T. Donohoe, Co. C, and 1st Lieut. J. F. Langley of Co. H, 
have resigned. 

Geo. H. Briggs of Co. C lias been transferred to the Band. 

Prisoners of war : See below and note it is slightly changed from June 
statement, because of further and definite information liavingbeen received. 





A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Total 


Sergeants 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 





5 


4 





5 




Corporals 


8 


6 


8 


8 


8 


8 


(J 


7 


8 


8 




Died of wounds . . 


2 


1 

















1 








4 


Died of disease . . . 


1 








1 

















3 


5 


Discharged for disability 





2 


1 


2 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 





14 


Musicians 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 








19 


Absent in arrest . . 


1 

















1 


2 





1 


5 


Prisoners of war . . 





1 


2 





1 

















4 


Absent sick .... 


3 


r. 


10 


8 


3 


9 


15 


11 


13 


1 


79 


Detached 


3 


2 





1 





4 


2 


2 


1 


5 


20 


Recruits required . . 


9 


12 


12 


14 


11 


12 


17 


21 


23 


18 


149 



The regiment was located as follows : — 
Co. B, Regimental Headquarters, Commissary, Quarter- 
master, Band Graham's. 

C Spanish Wells. 

D . . . Pope's. 

E Braddock's Point. 

F and the Hospital Stoney's. 

G - Seabrook. 

H Pinckney Island. 

^1 (on Provost Guard) Hilton Head. 

K (Pinckney Island first) Jenkins' Island. 




AUGUST. 1862. 



HE month of August was ushered in by an ordei' from Col. 

AYilliams, Commanding Post (Hilton Head), announcing 

|5yA the reported completion of an iron rebel ram at Savan- 

'" nah, and urging the utmost vigilance on the part of the 

outposts, particularly at Seabrook and at Braddock's 

Point. 

Our Chaplain visited Co. H, on Pinckney Island, on the 
2d, and also Co. G at Seabrook. The former company had a 
large number of sick, and the Chaplain took three of them to the 
hospital [probably Regimental, at Stoney's. — D. E.] 

We had a mail on the 4th ; and on the 5th the event of the day 
was the opening of a hotel at Hilton Head by Franz and Gilson. 
A deal of sickness prevailed among the companies and continued 
through the month. 

On the 6th, we find Dr. Moulton quite ill ; and he and Lieut. 
Marsh started North, on leaves of absence. 

Three of Co. H deserted, the 6th, to the enem}^, from their 
picket post on Pinckney Island. Their names were Charles H, 
Drew, Joseph Witham and James S. Wallace. This proved to be 
the forerunner of a more serious matter (see 21st). 

On the night of the 7th, the Co. E boys had a little scare. A 
rebel boat tried to land, but was driven oft". The War Department 
that day called the attention of sutlers to the fact that it was illegal 
to sell postage stamps for more than their face value. This was an 
outrage on the sutlers ! The little innocent thermometer indicated 
only 130° that day; and many horses decided they could not stand 
that figure, and actually died. Some of our comrades did the same 
thing. The writers experience in Co. K. at Jenkins' Island, inserted 
at this place, will only be a fair sample of what was occurring at 
the quarters of the other companies. 



SICKNESS AT JENKINS' ISLAND (CO. K). 
[Extract from the Memoirs of D. E.] 
The stay of the company at Jenkins' Island was from about the 24:th 
of July to the 25th of August .... I suffered mostly from the bloody 
dysentery. The duty performed by my company was in picketing- the lower 
(southerly) end of Pinckney Island ; and we also had two posts on Jenkins' 
Island. The Pinckney Island tours were weekly, crossing in boats. The 

(195) 



196 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Axfl. -62. 



duty became very hard for the few who were not sick. Jaundice, diptheria, 
malaria or sAvamp fever and other diseases soon took from our midst Ave 
comrades and prostrated many others. At one time our (piarters (the man- 
sion house) loolved more like a hospital than bar- 
racks. There were not enough well to possibly 
take good care of the sick. 

Let us take a walk through the building and 
see the sick and dying. Here is one as yelloAv as 
saffron, suffering from jaundice; another, whose 
speech is being slowly but surely cut off by that 
dreadful disease, diptheria. Yonder another suffer 
ing from some unknown disease which causes one 
to sleep incessantly for two or three days, and 
caused an alarming degree of stupidity. On the 
right lies a poor unfortunate, completely prostrated 
by diarrhoea in its worst form. On our left lies 
the victim of a fever, and for whom Death has 
been struggling for days. Such was the scene, 
and not overdrawn — no, not even up to Avhat it 
might be and still tell the truth. Scarcely a day 
passed during the first fortnight in August with- 
out the whispered message, one to another, that 

Comrade was dying. Many passed very 

near Death's door, and escaped the grim monster 
after all hope had fled, thus bringing joy to the 
hearts of comrades and discomfiture to the arch 
enemy. I have pictured the company without a 
thought of myself, my sympathies being dii'ected wholly to my comrades, as 
their cases seemed worse than my own. The sick list became so great that 
our picket detail had to be reduced, particularly that on Pinckney island. 




PALMETTO 



Among the many, very many peculiar phases of the war was 
one of the 8th. The Secretary of War issued an order (not num- 
bered in the series), directing all U. S. Marshals and Superintendents 
or Chiefs of Police of any city, town or district, to arrest and im- 
prison any person who may be engaged by act, speech or writing in 
discouraging volunteer enlistments, or in any way giving aid and 
comfort to the enemy. This was the order. The same day it was 
ordered that no citizeu liable to draft should leave the country or his 
county or state to avoid a pending draft, and the writ of habeas cor- 
pus was suspended to meet such cases. We will see later on whether 
the order was of any effect. 

The Chaplain's diary, !)th, says: "Our men are fast getting 
sick; the heat is dreadful ; few now are well." On the 10th (Sun- 
day) he says : " Attended a funeral in Co. K today ; many of their 
men are sick. Had services' with Co. F today, and visited the hos- 
pital." [Co. K at Jenkins' Island, Co. F and the hospital at 
Stoney's.— D. E.] 

A diary of the 10th reveals the fact that Spencer, drummer of 
Co. K, went on picket that day on Pinckney Island from (Jenkins' 
Island), as a substitute for one actually detailed. This shows how 
short Co. K was of available men. 

On the 11th, Gen. Halleck, Commaudiug the Army, ordered 
that all leaves of absence and furloughs, except from the War De- 
partment, be void, and all holders of such to at ouce return to their 
commands. This looked as if Gen. Halleck was getting desperate, 



Aluj. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 197 

and that he was determined to keep as many officers and men to the 
front as was possible. He probably had been cahnly engaged in 
examining the returns, particularly the " present " and "absent" 
columns. 

Thermometer only 105^ in the shade the 11th; but Col. Wil- 
liams, Commanding Post, found time to order that bathing parties 
should be marched to and from the beach by 1st Sergeants. We 
find that Gen. Halleck was assigned the 11th, by a general order, to 
the command of all the land forces, etc., though the order stated 
that the President ordered it on the 11th July, and that Gen. Halleck 
actually assumed command the 23d July. It would appear that the 
issue of the general order was inadvertently omitted at the proper 
time for issue. 

On the 12th we find the first mention of the sickness of our 
Commissary (Thompson). 

We had a "tremendous rain" on the 13th; and a facetious 
diary says, "There is no dead lightning nor deaf thunder in this 
country," etc. Before the shower the mei'cury stood 115° in shade. 
Twenty men sick in Co. F the 13th. 

The Chaplain became reflective on the 15th, and his diary says: 
" One year ago today I was commissioned. During the year I have 
seen some things and heard many more. I think the doctrine of 
total depravity is true. I have seen moral worth spring up where I 
did not expect it, and fail to appear where I most looked for it." A 
national salute was fired the 15th, from the forts, in memory of 
President Martin Van Bureu. Another event of that day was Gen. 
Hunter's order directing drill in the bayonet exercise. 

On the l()th the War Department issued an order (Gener^vl 
Order 10!)), announcing that on the 22d July the President ordered 
that military commanders in Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Arkansas, in 
an orderly manner, seize and use au}' property, real or personal, 
necessary or convenient for their several commands, as supplies or 
for other military purposes. Also, that they employ as laborers, 
within and from those States, so man}' persons of African descent as 
can be used advantageously, paying them reasonable wages. 

Why, oh, why could not the first part of this order have been 
issued earlier in the war, so as to have covered those pullets' eggs ! 
For several days past and also beyond this time we find the Chaplain 
quite ill. 

On the 19th, Gen. Hunter's order of that date told its own story. 
He ordered the Seventh New Hampshire to St. Augustine to relieve 
the Fourth NeAv Hampshire (probably seven companies) , and they 
to report at Hilton Head ; and Gen. Hunter announced the sad fact 
that officers had been returning fugitive slaves to their masters, and 
the soldiers had been stealing from the negroes. He directed Maj. 
Drew with three companies of Fourth New Hampshire to Beaufort, 
to report to Gen. Saxton for duty on the plantation near there, to 
protect the negroes. 



198 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. lAiuj. '62. 

The First Massachusetts Cavah-y went North on the 19th, tak- 
ing with them their Colonel (Williams), relieved as Post Commander 
by Col. Guss of the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania. 

A schooner arrived on the 20th from Bermuda, laden with pota- 
toes, being the first arrival from a foreign port since Port Poyal was 
declared to be a port of entry. 

On the night of the 20th, and before the dawn of the 21st, the 
most serious matter happened to the Third New Hampshire that ever 
occurred during its existence as an organization. We allude to the 
capture of Co. H, upon Pinckney Island, where it was doing outpost 
duty. We gave the reader a hint (on the 6th) that somethiug 
dreadful was to happen, and here it is. Lieut. Joseph C. Wiggin 
(formerly 1st Sergeant of Co. G) was the only officer with the 
company. He had only been commissioned a short time. There 's 
no accounting, in a satisfactory manner, why the force at this very 
important point was so small nor why only one officer was on duty 
there. A few days previous, 1st Sergeant Hopkins had been re- 
moved to the Hospital at Stoney's, very ill, and by many supposed 
to be with the dread disease, small-pox. Hopkins asserts very 
strongly that he tried to impress Lieut. Wigg'in, upon his removal to 
hospital, with the grave responsibility of his position, and to take 
double precautions against surprise. The accounts differ as to 
whether Lieut. Wiggin did renew his diligence and caution, and it is 
a disputed question as to whether it was possible to have avoided 
the result, as many claim it was inevitable, when the desertions 
of the 6th are considered. There are many who fully believed the 
desertions of the 6th and the capture of the 21st are connected ; and 
unless one is obtuse, he can see the point. By consulting the map 
shown elsewhere, it will be seen that Pinckney Island occupied an 
important position and one requiring a considerable force to properly 
watch and guard its extensive shores bordering on rebeldom. 

The Neiv York Times correspondent,- under date of 22d, and 
published 29th, said: "32 prisoners, 3 killed, 3 wounded, 16 
escaped. Eebels in six boats at two points. No property taken. 
Lieut. Wiggin, Private N. Downs and G. W. Adams killed; Chas. 
O. Ring and Charles Morgan mortally wounded, and Private H. H. 
Nichols seriously." 



CAPTURE OF CO. H. 

The capture of this Company, on the morning of 21 Aug. 1862, 
forms an important link in the history of the regiment, and was 
of sufficient importance then to warrant a recital of the story now. 

The compan}^ at the particular time was stationed near the 
northerly end of Pinckney Island, opposite Seabrook (Skull Creek 
intervening), and Seabrook being on the westerly side of Hilton 
Head Island and noted as being the point of departure by steam 
and otherwise of the retreating garrison from Fort Walker, 7 Nov. 
1861. 



AiKj. '62.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 199 

The company was quartered in and about the mansion house of 
the particukr plantation (name forgotten). The only officer with 
the company was 2d Lieut. Wiggin, not long previously promoted 
from 1st Sergeant of Co. G. 1st Sergt. Hopkins was quite sick 
and had been removed, say two or three days prior to the memorable 
event, to the regimental hospital at Stoney Plantation, Hilton 
Head, and placed in a tent by himself, it being strongly suspected 
that he had smallpox. Co. F was at same plantation, which bor- 
dered upon Skull Creek, and was not far distant from Seabrook, where 
Co. G was stationed, under Capt. Emmons. Pinckney Island being 
located substantially next to the main land, the importance of the 
post was apparently underrated. 

It may be inferred that the capture of a companj^ meaus nearly 
if not quite a hundred men ; but this cannot be correct, for all 
companies are more or less decimated by casualties, by men alisent 
in hospital, on detached service, on furloughs, and otherwise, so 
that the number actuall}" captured in this particular case was cou- 
siderably less than half of a full company. 

A statement of the affair, bj' one of the captured, forms an im- 
portant link in the interesting chain and will be given later on. The 
night was dark as well as foggy, the latter not lifting till about 9 a.m. 
About 3 or 3.30 a.m., the guards at Co. G, Seabrook, heard firing 
in the direction of Co. H's station ; but no great importance was 
attached to it, as it might have occurred under quite unimportant 
conditions. As soon as the fog lifted, however, several men who 
had escaped crossed the creek to Co. G and gave the alarm — too 
late of course to be of the slightest benefit. Among those who 
escaped were Griggs, Kelsea, Cammell, Gracey and Parker. Capt. 
Emmons at once manned a boat, went over and skirmished up to the 
mansion house, but found no enemy. The dead and wounded were 
then taken to Seabrook. Lieut. Wiggin was found dead, with at 
least seven distinct wounds, besides one in the arm, into w^hich latter 
the wad had been blown, showing that the shot was fired at close 
quarters. One man, Ring, had been bayoneted to death beneath 
the house, whither he had probably crawled to secrete himself. 
This particular case was one of peculiar sadness. It is said that 
Ring's father arrived that very day from the North on a visit and, it 
would appear, just in time to receive his personal effects. Another 
case, almost the reverse, was that of Private Thurber. He had been 
discharged from the General Hospital, and the discharge had been 
sent to his company at Pinckney. He started to rejoin his company 
to get his discharge and bid the boys good-bye. Either the weather 
or his weariness caused him to stop over night at Co. G ; and thus he 
escaped the terrible ordeal his comrades had to undergo, and probably 
escaped death or captivity. A letter of Col. Jackson to the Gov- 
ernor of New Hampshire, dated Aug. 21, Headquarters, Graham's 
Plantation, says: ". . . .1 have just sent a large force to the 
island." Lieut. Wiggin and (probably) the other dead were buried 
at Seabrook. 



200 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aut/. '62. 

LIEUT.-COL. JACKSON'S FIRST REPORT. 

IIeadquauteks, Graham's Plantation, 

Aug. 21, 18(;2 — 7.30 a.m. 
Sir : I have just received reports from Pinckney Island that the com- 
pany posted on the eastern end of the island was surprised this morning by 
apparently three companies of rebels. The lieutenant in command was 
taken prisoner and about 40 men. One sergeant and five privates escaped 
and are reported on their way to these headquarters. They report the 
rebels at 6 o'clock this morning on the island in some force, and wearing a 
blue uniform similar to our own. I have notified all my officers to have 
their commands in readiness to move on to Pinckney Island. As you have 
been notified from Seabrook, I wait further orders, thinking you may think 
proper to send a gunboat to cut oft" the retreat of the rebels. 

Yours, with respect, 
H. W. Cakruthers, John H. Jackson, 

Post Adjutant. Lieutenant- CoJoncJ Coinmaudinfj. 



LIEUT.-COL. JACKSON'S SECOND REPORT. 

Headquarters Third New Hampshihb A^olunteers, 
Graham's Plantation, 
Hilton Head, S. C, Aug. 21, 1862—10.45. 

Sir : Yours in reply to my communication of this morning is received. 
After sending my report, I learned from some of those who escaped from 
the island that Lieut. Wiggin was left on the island, either killed or wounded 
badly, and that a number of our men were left there either killed or wounded. 

Maj. Plimpton, with a detachment from each of the four companies 
on the river, immediately landed on Pinckney Island to investigate the 
whole afiiair, as far as possible, and to recover those of our men who were 
killed or wounded. Lieut. Wiggin and one private, killed in resisting the 
attack, have been sent to Seabrook's Wharf , with some wounded men, who 
need the assistance of a surgeon. I gave Capt. Emmons orders to send to 
Hilton Head for a surgeon, which I suppose he has done ere this. I have 
a report at this moment from the captain commanding the picket on the 
western end of the island, who has visited his posts; and they report all 
quiet during the night, heard no guns, cries or anything of the kind, and 
also report that the enemy's pickets present no unusual appearance. They 
fired, however, on our pickets a number of times this morning. 

I shall be able to send 40 men tonight to occupy Co. H's former 
position. On Pinckney Island there are a large number of contrabands 
and several well-cultivated plantations. The contrabands need protection, 
and the plantations are valuable for their produce. 

I have been all over the island lately, and came to the conclusion that 
it needs five or six companies on the island to prevent these raids on our 
pickets. Please inform me if I shall continue to put pickets on that end of 
the island. Respectfully yours, 

John H. Jackson, 
H. W. Carruthers, Commanding Tliird Neic Ilamj^shire Vols. 

Post Adjutant. 



LIEUT.-COL. JACKSON'S THIRD REPORT. 

Headquarters Third New Hajipshire Volunteers, 

Hilton Head, S. C, Sept. 1, 1862. 
General : I have the honor to present the following report respecting 
an attack on the pickets of this regiment, stationed on Pinckney Island. 
The attack took place just before daylight on the morning of Thursday, 
Aug. 21. The enemy landed on the island from six boats, five of them 
landing above the pickets, and approached the camp from the side where 
no guard was stationed, and fired a volley before they were discovered. 
The other boat came round the point to where one of our pickets Avas 
stationed, very near the camp. The sentinel challenged twice, and the 



Ai(>/. '62.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 201 

lienteuant stepped from his tent and approached him. He had gone but a 
short distance when a volley was fired from the enemy, they being then in 
the camp. 

Lieut. Wiggin was found dead a short distance from his tent, with 
eight or nine wounds on his body. The rebels remained but a short time 
on the island, and took but little of the company property, and did not 
destroy the tents. The enemy have presented no unusual appearance since 
the attack. Our loss Avas : Killed: 1 lieutenant, 3 pi'ivates ; total, i. 
Wounded: 2 privates; total, 2. Missing: 3 sergeants, 4 corporals, 29 
privates ; total, 3<;. One of the wounded men has since died, and the other 
was severely wounded and may not recover. 

A number of rebels were either killed or wounded, according to one 
of the corporals who was taken prisoner ; but the squad having him in 
charge was fired upon, probably by their own men in the darkness, and the 
fire was returned. In the confusion the corporal escaped, the guard at his 
side being shot dead. 

On the *^th of August, three men of Co. H deserted from Pinckney 
Island, and a new disposition of the pickets was immediately made and 
the utmost vigilance urged upon the lieutenant (Wiggin) commanding that 
post. At different times two detachments of fresh men were sent to 
Pinckney Island, to prevent the old pickets from relaxing their vigilance 
from great fatigue. At the time when the last detachment Avas sent, I 
accompanied it, and examined all the picket posts, and pointed out particu- 
larly the necessity of great vigilance at the very point where the enemy 
landed on the 21st ultimo, and called the particular attention of the lieu- 
tenant to tlie importance of the post. 

Since the surprise of the company (H), I have learned that the lieu- 
tenant (most unaccountably to me) removed entirely the guard at that post 
and the patrol from that point along the road to their camp. Lieut. 
Wiggin proved himself a brave man at the battle on James Island, June 16, 
and nothing previous to this unfortunate aSair has ever happened to shake 
my confidence in his ability as an oftlcer. 

It was a great lack of vigilance and judgment on his part, and his too 
strong sense of security cost him the loss of his life and the regiment the 
loss of nearly an entire company. Every precaution was taken on my part 
to prevent any surprise of that post. 

With great respect, your obedient servant, 

John H. Jackson, 
CnJ. Coinmandinfj Third New Hampshire Vols. 
^laj.-Gen. Huntek, Commanding Department of South. 



The deserters., Chas. H. Drew, Joseph "VVitham and James S. 
Wallace, were all paroled at Rit-hmond with the men of Co. H, aud 
when arrived at Annapolis were put under arrest by the Provost 
Marshal and sent to Fort McHenr^^, Baltimore. Drew and Wallace 
escaped — the former enlisting in a regiment of Maryland cavalry, 
and Wallace going to England. Drew was afterward apprehended 
and sent to Hilton Head, where he remained in confinement till re- 
leased by the closing of the war. Witham was also sent from Fort 
McHenry to Alexandria, and finally reached Hilton Head, being- 
taken from Alexandria to Hilton Head by Sergt. James of Co. D, 
who was sent from Morris Island for the purpose. Witham was 
finally released from Provost and rejoined the company. He says 
(1891) he never was tried, and actually received his full (back) 
pay. As to Drew, at this writing he had been unable to amend his 
record as a deserter, notwithstanding he actually served in a Union 
regiment after leaving the Third New Hampshire. 



•202 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aug. '62. 

The following account is given by one of the captured : — 

On the 4th day of July Co. H, having been detailed for that service, 
went from Hilton Head to Pinckney Island to do outpost picket duty. The 
company consisted of between 50 and (!0 men, under command of Lieut. 
Joseph C. Wiggin, and were quartered at two plantation houses, head- 
quarters being established at what was called "The Point" — a house 
standing at the junction of Broad River and Skull Creek, and situated on a 
bluft' overlooking both streams. The other hoiTse was about three-quarters 
of a mile south, and 1st Sergt. Henry F. Hopkins was in command of the 
men stationed there. The territory covered by the company in their tour 
of duty was about three miles in extent, posts being established at the most 
important points. Soon after going to Pinckney Island many of the men 
were taken ill. Several were sent to the hospital at Hilton Head, others 
Avere put on light duty, and still others were excused from duty altogether 
for the time being. Orders were received from regimental headquarters to 
make the duty of the men as light as possible during the day, but to keep a 
strict watch at night, as rumors were prevalent of visits of rebel officers 
from the troops stationed at Grahamville ; and it was also stated that some 
of the colored men in their Ashing trips were in the habit of going over to 
the mainland. 

In the afternoon of the Gth of August three men of the company were 
granted permission by Lieut. Wiggin to go up the river fishing. Not re- 
turning at retreat, inquiries were instituted; and it was found that they 
went from the beach to the "Middle Plantation," so called, and before 
going secured the musket of the guard on duty at that point, discharged it, 
and then threw the ramrod into the river. As these would-be fishermen did 
not return at dark, word was sent to regimental headquarters ; and an ad- 
ditional force was sent to Pinckney Island to remain during the night, as 
it was thought quite likely that the rebels would ascertain our exact con- 
dition from the men who had apparently deserted and that an attack was 
liable at any time. The additional force remained through the night; but 
no demonstrations were made towards us by the enemy. Things went on 
as usual with us on the island till the night of the 20th of August. Soon 
after dark word came from two picket posts of tires burning brightly on 
the banks of Broad River, on the mainland above Corn Island ; and sounds 
of oars in the rowlocks Avere heard quite frecjuently, Lieut. Wiggin did 
not attach much importance to these facts and attributed them to fishing- 
parties. Orders were, however, given to the guard to be vigilant and not 
allow themselves to be surprised. Up to this time no word had been re- 
ceived from the three men who left us so unceremoniously on the Gth of 
the month ; and they had been reported at headquarters as deserters . 

The next morning (Aug. 21), about daybreak, an alarm came from the 
post at the boat landing, that the rebels were being disembarked from boats 
at the northwest corner of the island. The men of Co. H not on duty were 
asleep in their quarters : and before they could get out, a detachment of the 
enemy, commanded by Capt. Mickler, had landed and deployed across the 
end of the island, Avhich at that point was very narrow, and were preparing 
to attack the house where the men were quartered. The writer of this 
Avas one of the first out ; and on his trip down the path leading to the post 
at the boat landing, through the bushes, was fired at three times, but fortu- 
nately escaped injury. He was at once foUoAved by Lieut. Wiggin, who 
appeared on the scene Avithout coat or vest and Avithout side arms. He 
inquired as to the cause of the disturbance, and was told that it Avas 
apparently an attack by the enemy. He scouted the idea and said he Avould 
ascertain what the matter Avas. He at once started into the Avoods and 
Avas made a prisoner by Capt. Mickler. As the men made their appearance 
from the house they were fired at. One rebel fired through one of the 
open AvindoAvs, resting his musket on the sill, and Avounded Enoch T. 
Harvey badly in one shoulder. Several others were Avounded, and three 
were killed. The first squad of rebels, having captured all the men about 
the house, were forming them in line ready to march to the boats, Avhen the 
second detachment of the enemy, under Capt. Elliott, came up to the edge 



Am/. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 203 

of the woods; and seeing raeu in line near the house, apparently mistook 
them for our men, and fired a volley at them, wounding nine men belonging 
to Capt. Mickler's command, that officer himself being badly wounded 
besides. On the firing of the volley, Lieut. Wiggin started for the blutt" on a 
run, and was fired at by the rebels ; and he fell, receiving eleven wounds. By 
this time Capt. Elliott and his men came up, and after caring for the 
wounded, the prisoners were marched to the landing and loaded into boats ; 
and the procession started up the river to the mainland. 

On arriving at the mainland the men were disembarked and marched 
about two miles, when they came to a plantation house, situated in the midst 
of beautiful grounds, but which showed signs of neglect. Here they were 
furnished with something to eat. In the course of an hour the wagons came 
up from the river, Avhere they had been after the boats used by the expedi- 
tion, which were unloaded at this plantation. 

The men of Co. H were ordered to take their places in these rude, lum- 
bering vehicles, and soou started for Grahamville, -which place Avas reached 
soon after dark. No insults were ofl'ered the men ; but on the contrary, a per- 
son meeting them might think the party had been out for pleasure. There were 
some fine singers among the rebels, and the air resounded with songs the 
whole day, and many a laugh went up on the conclusion of stories told by men 
on both sides. We Avere prisoners ; but it was thought best to make the best 
of it. 

On arrival at Grahamville we were escorted up the main street by the 
Avhole population, apparentlj^ and the street was made brilliant with bonfires. 
We were takeu to a large unoccupied house, where a generous supper was 
provided for us, consisting of boiled rice, fried bacon, boiled fresh beef and 
soft bread. Husks were prepared in abundance for us to sleep on, and we 
all had a good night's rest. Early the next morning Ave Avere called up, pro- 
vided Avith breakfast, and then ordered to •' fall in." We Avere marched to 
the Grahamville depot on the Charleston & Savannah Railroad, and Avere soon 
on the cars. Our guard at this time consisted of Capt. Elliott and his men, 
a detachment of Beaufort Artillery. They Avere pleasant and agreeable and 
treated us more like friends than enemies. The detachment commanded by 
Capt. Mickler Aveut Avith the Avounded to Hardeeville, Avhere there is a hos- 
pital. Our next stop Avas at Pocotaligo, Avhere Ave left the cars and marched 
about four miles to McPhersonville. a small settlement, and Avere there 
turned over to Smith's Sharpshooters, a detachment doing duty there and 
under command of Lieut. Seabrook. We Avere very Avell treated here and 
had plenty to eat. 

After staying here a Aveek Ave received orders early in the "morning to 
fall in, and were taken in Avagons to Pocotaligo, Avhere Ave boarded the train 
for Charleston, Avhere Ave arrived at 2 p.m., and were marched across the city 
to another depot to take cars for Columbia, S. C, 134 miles aAvay. Rumors 
of a move by the Federals on Pocotaligo Avas the cause of our hurried re- 
moval. At 8 P.M. we entered the cars ; and about sunrise Ave reached Colum- 
bia, and Avere marched to the district jail, a distance of a mile. Here our 
names Avere taken and a parole was signed, alloAving us the liberty of the 
large building and yard. In the latter AA'as running water in abundance, and 
a very large shade tree. 

On our arrival at this place Ave found 13-1 Union prisoners — mostly 
captured on James Island, June 10, 1862. They represented the Seventy- 
ninth NcAV York, Eighth Michigan, TAventy-eighth ]\Iassachusetts, Fifty-fifth 
Pennsylvania, Third Rhode Island Artillery and Third Ncav Hampshire. 
Here Ave found the three men Avho left us so abruptly on the 6th of August. 
The party was divided into three messes, and had rations, consisting of 
flour, ham, sugar, soap and rice, issued once aAveek; also, every morning 
we Avere furnished Avith fresh beef. As the amount of flour given us Avas 
not sufficient to last us through the Aveek, the ham and sugar Avere sold, and 
the proceeds invested in corn and meal. We Avere allowed 75 cents a pound 
for the sugar and 50 cents a pound for the ham. Corn meal Avas furnished 
us for .SI. 25 a bushel, the first lot Ave got, but the next Aveek it Avent up to 
$3. Bread soda Avas $3 a pound. No ration of salt Avas issued to us, and 
it had to be purchased, the price paid being $1 a pound. We had tAvo meals 



204 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aiiffr62- 

a da.v : breakfast — consisting of soup made of bones boiled in water, thick- 
ened Avith corn meal (no salt), and a piece of corn bread — at 9 a.m., and 
dinner aliont 4 p.m., which was composed of soup made of the meat from 
the aforesaid bones, some rice and a piece of corn and wheat bread. Time 
passed very slowly, the men amusing themselves by playing checkers — 
marking out the diagram on the hard ground, using pieces of bark to play 
with. Others employed themselves playing marbles, and still others in- 
dulging in gymnastic exercises, walking matches, etc. The health of the 
men at this time was good, no one being seriously ill. We were treated 
much better than we expected from reports we had heard of the cruelty 
exercised toward Federal prisoners. Fresh Avater for drinking purposes 
was obtained from Eutaw spring, but a short distance from the jail, and 
some of the guard were always ready to go with the men when the buckets 
and pails were empty; and better water I never tasted^ cold, clear and 
sparkling as from the springs in our dear old Granite State. 

October 5, 1862, we were told to be ready the next morning to start for 
Richmond, and that we were to be paroled there and go inside the Federal 
lines to wait for exchange. Those having been placed in similar circum- 
stances do not need to be told how long the time was before daylight the 
next morning. But it came at last, only to bring us disappointment, as Avord 
was received that, owing to non-arrival of the cars, we would not start till 
the following morning. The time passed away at last, and on the morning 
of October 7 Ave bade adieu to the old jail and started for the depot. W^e 
were furnished Avith four days' rations, consisting of four small biscuits and 
some fried bacon — a small quantity for four days, and probably not a man 
but devoured it before night of the first day. 

We arrived at Charlotte, N. C , about dark, and were marched a mile 
or so to another depot, Avhere we had to Avait till midnight for the arrival of 
the train from the north. The guard over us was not very strict, and Ave 
were alloAved to roam about at our pleasure. About daybreak Ave passed 
through Salisbury, N. C, a place many a Yankee prisoner has cause to remem- 
ber. The villages along the line of the road had a deserted appearance, able- 
bodied Avhite men being conspicuous by their absence. Just before dark Ave 
reached Raleigh, N. C, where Ave left the train and had to stay on the plat- 
form of the depot all night; and as there Avas a heaA^y white frost, and our 
clothes being thin, Ave suffered greatly from the cold. Poor whiskey seemed 
to be plenty. Several fights occurred among the guard, and one Avas so badly 
disabled he had to be left behind. Soon after daylight Ave boarded a train of 
open cars, and without any mishaps arrived at Weldon, N. C, about 2 o'clock 
P.M., Avhere Ave were told we had got to Avait till midnight for a train. Here 
Ave had hardtack furnished us in abundance, and the time Avas mostly passed 
aAvay in sleeping, as the opportunity for doing so for the past tAventy-four 
hours had been poor. At 2 a.m. the ti.iiii arrived, and Ave boarded it. They 
were second-class passenger cars and leaked badly, as Ave soon found out, 
as a shoAver came up which lasted till Ave arrived at Peterslrarg at 8 a.m. We 
remained here till 10 a.m., when Ave started for Richmond, about 20 miles 
distant, Avhere Ave arrived at noon. W^e Avere marched to " Hotel de Libbey," 
and were assigned (luarters on the second floor. In the cource of the next 
day we Avere called doAvu and signed a parole, and Avere told Ave should be 
sent inside our OAvn lines. We learned from one of the guard that a large 
lot of officers, captured at Shiloh, Avere to go doAvn riA^er Avith us, and as 
soon as they arrived we should start. Our food here Avas small in quantity 
and very poor in quality, as e\'ery soldier confined in this place can testify. 

About the first of November we started for Aiken's Landing, about 1.5 
miles down the river, Avhere Ave boarded the flag of truce boat, the JoJin A. 
Warner. At noon the next day we reached Fort Monroe, wheie we were 
transferred to the Kennebec, and about dark we arrived at Annapolis, and 
Avere marched directly to Camp Parole, some tAvo miles out of the city. 
Here were betAveen 15,000 and 20,000 paroled men Avaiting for exchange — 
every loyal State being represented. Here Ave remained till Ave Avere notified 
to be ready to go back to the regiment. Several men Avere discharged at 
this place ; some Avere in hospital, and others Avere detailed on special duty : 
so when the squad started for the regiment, there Avere but 14 out of the 36 



AiKj. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 205 

captured. We went to New York and secured transportation back to Hilton 
Head, Avhere we arrived Feb. 5, 18(!o, after an absence of nearly six months. 
We were Avelcomed back b}^ Col. John H. Jackson, and then sent to our 
((uarters, and the next day resumed our duties. Todd. 



Another diary saj's : " Lieut. Wiggiii and 3 men killed, IG men 
escaped, and 35 men taken prisoners. The Seventh Connecticut 
ordered to the place." 

Another diary says (written by a Co. F man at Stoney's Plan- 
tation) : " Capt. Randlett and boat's crew started for Hilton Head 
soon after 3 a.m. At daylight returned in a hurry, and reported 
capture of Co. H. Capt. Randlett reported to Col. .Jackson, and soon 
came back ; and Co. F was soon in surf boats on their wa^^ to Pinck- 
ney. Landed and marched five miles to Co. H's Headquarters. 
Found 42 [mistake. — D.E.] taken prisoners, 3 killed (including 
Lieut. Wiggin), and 3 wounded. Co. F posted pickets. Relieved at 
i) P.M. by parts of G and B. Co. F then embarked in the Washington 
for Seabrook, thence by their own boats to Stoney's (the headquarters 
of the company), arriving there at midnight." 

This capture shook our whole force, from center to circumfer- 
ence ; and to dilate upon the degree of "shake" in the regiment 
most interested would seem superfluous. 



CONFEDERATE ACCOUNT OF THE CAPTURE. 

McPheusonville, 22 Aug. 1802. 

I have tlie lionor to report that from the reconnoissance of Lieut. -Col. 
Colcock of the Second Battalion Cavalry, and Capt. J. H. Mickler, Eleventh 
Infantry, and the information obtained from three deserters, I was satistled 
that a force of the enemy, stationed on the northeast point of Pinckney 
Island and believed not to exceed one hundred men, could be surprised and 
captured. For this purpose I ordered Capt. Stephen Elliott of the Beaufort 
Artillery, with Capt. J. H. Mickler of the Eleventh Infantry, to organize a 
boat expedition. 

(Report of Capt. Elliott enclosed.) 

For a due understanding of the hazardous nature of the undertakina, 
it is necessary to state that a jiunboat cruises in the immediate neighborhood, 
and her masts were seen through the trees from the enemy's encampment. 
There was not only the danger attending an attack upon an enemy equal in 
force, but the still greater risk of being intercepted by the powerful bat- 
teries of a war steamer. The conception of the expedition required daring 
and great rapidity in execution. A prolonged contest, even if successful, 
would have been fatal in its results .... 

W. S. Walker, 
Col. Comiiiawh'iv/ Third District 



.... On the IStli, in company with Capt. Mickler, I made a careful 
reconnoissance of the island, and formed my plan of attack. I extended 
orders to Capt. Mickler to transport four boats from Horton's to Bear Island, 
and to join me there on the evening of the 21st [20th. — D E.] with 100 
men. I also directed that 50 men of the Beaufort Artillery, with muskets 
and a -i-pounder boat gun. should meet me at Boyd's Landing, on the 19th, 
in order to take six boats to Foot Point and Bear Island, by the way of 
Broad River .... on the 21st, at 3 a.m., I left Bear Island with detach- 
ments of Capt. Mickler's, Leadbetter's and Westcoat's companies, under the 
command of their captains, and of the Beaufort Artillery, under Lieut. 
Stuart — in all 120 men, 36 of whom acted as oarsmen and remained in the 



206 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGBIENT. [A>i,/. '62. 

boats, t) in lumiber. Passing down the creek, t^vo miles in length, I lauded 
at early dawn on Pinckuey Island, 300 yards in rear of the dwelling house, 
which is situated at the apex of an angle whose sides include about 40 de- 
grees. Deploying rapidly across the base, I moved forward towards the 
point over the ground, — on one side open and on the other covered by a 
dense thicket, — up to the camp of Co. H, Third New Hampshire, surprising 
them, killing, accoi'ding to the most careful estimate, 15 and capturing 3G, 
four of whom Avere wounded. Six were seen to escape, and 5 are known 
to have been absent. These, with the previous numbers named, give 62, the 
number on their morning report book. The Lieutenant in command, the only 
officer present, either escaped or was killed- — there is good reason to believe 
the latter. To avoid delay in so exposed a position, I forbade the men to 
touch an article, and we returned, bringing oft" the company records and tAvo 
fine boats, having remained on the island fifteen minutes. Eight of my men 
were wounded, six of them, I regret to say, by their own men. This is the 
more provoking, as I earnestly and repeatedly warned both officers and men 
against this very danger. Some reason for this may exist in the fact that 
some of the men Avere engaged for the first time, that the disaster sprung 
from an excess of zeal and courage, and that there Avas not light enough to 
distinguish persons from a distance. The mixture of small detachments 
too, at all times an element of confusion, is especially so in surprises at 
night, A\"hen the necessity of silence demands the most rigid discipline and 
uniformity of action .... Stephex Elliott, 

Capt. Commanding Expeilithm. 

Following are the casualties iu the affair of Aug. 21, 1862 : — 

KILLED. 

Lieut. Joseph C. Wiggin. Private Charles O. Ring. 

Private George AV. Adams. " Nathaniel DoAvns. 

WOUNDED. 

Private Charles Morgan (not captured : died of Avounds). 
" Wm. H. H. Nichols (not captured). 

PRISONERS. 

Sergt. Charles F. French. Priv. Jeremiah Dugan. 

Corpl. Henry C. Page. " Frank Ferren. 

" George W. Burnham. " Enoch T. Harvey (Avounded). 

" Chas. Sherman. " Josiah F. Hunt. 

" Jerome B. McQuestion. " John Lockling. 

Chas. Harvey. " Alden E. Metcalf. 

Geo. Clough. " Leroy McDuttee. 

Wm. Todd. " James O'Neil. 

Priv. Thomas Adams. " Timothy Parker. 

" Eben Adams. " Ira B. Perry. 

" America Briggs. " David B. Page. 

Albert Blood. " Walter J. Richards. 

" EdAvard Bickford. " James C. Roach. 

" Charles F. Burnham " Wm. Robinson. 

Wm. Butterfleld. " John A. Smith. 

" John Brady. " George A. Turner. 

" James Carahan. " Patrick Welsh. 

" John B. Davis. " Daniel Jepperson, Jr. (died of 

wounds). 

The same eventful day, Gen. Hunter announced the appoint- 
Tuent on his Staff of 1st Lieut. EdAvard W. Smith of the 15th U. S. In- 
fantry as Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, relieving Maj. Charles 
G. Halpine, who had been ordered to duty with Maj. -Gen. Halleck, 
Commander-in-Chief. The two officers named, each in his turn, be- 
came identified with the Department of the South. The latter was 



Au(/. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMEXT. 207 

the "Miles O'Reilly" who figured so extensively in the Department 
through the columns of The Xeiv South (the little paper printed at 
Hilton Head — first published 15 March 1-S62), and who also wrote 
two or more books, each of which was interspersed with poems. His 
forte consisted largely of local hits and satires. One occasion for a 
poem was the death of a favorite bull at the hands of cruel soldiers, 
the aforesaid bull being the ostensible property of a lady located on 
one of the Sea Islands. The writer may be pardoned for forgetting 
the major part of the poem ; but it began by assuming that the lady 
owner was appealing to Gen. Hunter. The poem opened thus : — 

Dear General H., my heart is full, 
Laraentins for my butchered bull : 
The only bull our islands had. 

Later on in the poem, the memory of the writer only recalls a 
few parts of verses : — 

The cruel soldiers, fierce and full 

Of reckless wrath, have shot my bull : 

The stateliest bull — let scott'ers laugh — 

A bull as noble, firm and fair 
As that which aided Jove to bear 
Europa from the flowing glades. 

Quick to the North your order send 
(By Smith's congenial spirit penned), 
And order them, in language full, 
At once to send me down a bull. 

(The Smith named was "A. A. Adjt.-Gen." Smith.) The reader 
will readily forgive the omissions. The memory of the writer, after 
so great a lapse of time, must not be expected to carry a poem, as a 
whole, forever. 

On the 2 2d the Third New Hampshire was ordei'ed to be relieved, 
and on the 23d and 24th the various companies of the regiment were 
reunited at their old camp at Hilton Head, near the General Hospi- 
tal and within the fortifications, the baggage and parts of the com- 
panies, in most cases, being conveyed thither in boats via Skull 
Creek. The relieving troops were the Forly-seventh New York and 
the Seventh Connecticut. 

The next day (25th) the regiment was ordered on Post Guard 
(camp not moved), and Col. Jackson issued au order establishing 
the daily cftUs. 

On the day following (26th), 1st Lieut. Ayer was ordered to 
the command of Co. H; and the same order (regimental) directed 
that where only one commissioned officer was with a company, the 
1st Sergeant could report the result of roll calls to the Adjutant. 

The other events of the 26th were the deaths of our Commissary, 
Lieut. Thompson of Co. I, and Private Samuel Sweet of Co. B. The 
pickets at Braddock's Point were attacked on the night of the 25th. 
It was presumably the result of a change in the force there, Co. E 
of our regiment having been relieved a day or two before by four 
companies of the Forty-seventh New York. 



208 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aii,j. '62. 

Such was tbe esteem in which Lieut. Thompsou was held, that 
on the 27th Col. Jackson issued an order announcing the fact of his 
death; and the same order detailed 1st Lieut. John R. Hynes of Co. 
A as Acting Commissary. 

The same day, Gen. Hunter issued the expected order for the 
muster-out of our regimental band on the 31st : that duty to be per- 
formed by Capt. Jackson of the Regular Army and Inspector-General 
of the Department. 

A diary of that day says : " Men are very sick in our regiment : 
five lay dead." All the diaries agree that sickness was very prevalent. 

There was a general review of all the troops on the 29th, at 5.30 
P.M., and upon the parade ground nearly in our regimental front. 
This review was ordered by Col. Guss, Ninety-seventh Penns3'lvania, 
Commanding the Post. 

The 30th was another day of interest. We must have had a 
mail, as the commissions arrived, and they fill the vacancies caused 
in June last. Capt. Plimpton of Co. E was announced as Major 
and directed to turn over the company to 2d Lieut. D. J. Flanders. 
This order must also have announced that Lieut. -Col. Jackson 
was promoted to Colonel, vice Col. Fellows (resigned), and Maj. 
Bedel to Lieutenant-Colonel, vice Jackson (promoted) . These com- 
missions had been a long time coming. 

[Note. — They had actually been received before, but had been sent 
back for revision as to date. When fivst received the commissions did not 
bear date coequal with Col. Fellows' discharge, thus working an injustice. 
They were revised.] 

So short were we of officers for duty, that 1st Sergt. Stearns of 
F and 2d Sergt. Head of B were ordered to act as Officers of 
the Guard. This is the first of its kind found by the writer. 
Earlier as well as later instances were quite frequent wiaere 1st 
sergeants and sergeants were appointed acting 2d lieutenants. 

To round out the month with interesting matter, the 31st saw 
the muster-out of our beloved Band (see "Band"). A general 
order was issued by Col. Guss, Commanding Post, announcing the 
sentences in several cases of court-martial, among them a few in the 
Third New Hampshire (see General Court-Martial) . Though the 
month ended on Sunday, we had no services, as so many men were 
away on duty. The usual muster and inspection was had. As our 
Colonel mustered his own regiment, he had to go wherever the men 
were to muster them, except those who were to and did return during 
the day. 

IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 94 of the 4th directed a draft of 300,000 militia, 
to serve nine months. 

General Order 97 of the 7th directed that no sutler shall sell a 
postage stamp for more than its face value. 

General Order 98 of the 8th detached "West Florida from Depart- 
ment of the South, and added it to Department of the Gulf (Butler's) . 



Aug. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 209 

General Order 100 of the 11th revoked that part of General 
Order 61 (see June, 1862) relating to extensions of sick leaves of 
absence, and provided that no applications for such extensions be 
made thereafter. The order also provided that all who had been 
absent more than sixty days (for wounds or disease), and still 
unable to rejoin, would be reported to the War Department for dis- 
charge. 

General Order 101 of the 11th assigned Gen. Halleck to com- 
mand of all the land forces of the United States. (This order really 
promulgated an order of the President, dated 11 July. Gen. Halleck 
really assumed command 23 July. ) 

General Order 104 of the 13th directed that no person liable to 
draft should be allowed to go to a foreign country ; and if he absented 
himself prior to draft, to be arrested on his return to the United States, 
The writ of habeas corpus was suspended in such cases. Couriers 
between legations of friendly powers were exempted from this order. 

General Order 107 of the loth provided that officers of the regu- 
lar army will, as a rule, be granted leaves of absence to accept 
rank of not less than Colonel in volunteer regiments, and that non- 
coms, or privates in regular army shall be discharged from regular 
army to accept commissions in volunteer regiments. 

General Order 108 of the 16th provided that bounty and advance 
pay will not be paid to volunteers for new regiments, but only to 
volunteers for regiments in the Held and to fill up new regiments then 
organizing but not yet full. For the latter the men will be paid the 
bounty and advance pay till 22 Aug., and if regiments are not then 
complete they will be consolidated and superfluous officers mustered 
out. Volunteers for old regiments will be received and paid the 
bounty and advance pay till 1 Sept. 

General Order 109 of the 16th directed all military commanders 
in Virginia, South Carolina, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, 
Texas and Arkansas to seize in an orderly manner, and use for the 
necessities or convenience of their commands, any rebel property, real 
or personal, for supplies or other military purposes — none to be de- 
stroyed in wantonness or malice. And military and naval commanders 
were authorized to employ as laborers, within and from the States 
named, as many persons of African descent as can be advantageously 
used for military or naval purposes, paying them reasonable wages. 

General Order 111 of the 18th forbade further appointments to 
grade of Major-General or Brigadier-General for meritorious conduct, 
etc., except to officers of the regular army and to volunteer officers 
who by some successful achievement in the field shall have displayed 
the ability for the duties of a general officer ; and no appointment to 
be made till after examination as to fitness, etc. 

General Order 114 of the 21st forbade any officer (regular or 
volunteer) visiting Washington except on leave so specified ; and such 
can only be granted by the War Department. 

General Order 121 of the 29 th provided that all supplies for 
States of New Hampshire, Maine and Massachusetts should be drawn 
from Capt. McKim, Assistant Quartermaster at Boston, Mass. 



210 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Aur/. '62. 

IMPORTANT ORDERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 26 of the 15th directed that special drill in the 
bayonet exercise be at once begun, and that future inspections shall 
include scrutiny as to proficiency in that exercise. 

General Order 32 of the 27th repeated the order of the War De- 
partment (Act of Congress approved 1 7 July) , directing the muster- 
out of all regimental bands on the last day of the month. Capt. 
Eichard H. Jackson, First United States Artillery, assigned to that 
duty. 

The Department Statistics for August, 1862, are: Total troops, 
13,145; wounded and sick cases, 3,802; died, 77; wounded, 102; 
died of wounds, etc., 4. 

The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and Staff — men, - officers. 

Band — " 

Co. A 8i) " 2 

B 82 " 2 " 

C 85 " 2 " 

D 83 " 3 " 

E 8.5 " 2 

F 84 " 3 

G 75 " 3 

H 71 " 1 

I 75 " 1 " 

K 77 " 2 

Present aggregate 865 

Aggregate last report .... 898 

The Band, though mustered out 31st, was still borne on the rolls, 
as the discharges had not actually been given. 

Seven men (B, E, G, H) have died of wounds : one (Merrill of 
B) in the hands of the enemy. Five men (G, H) are dropped as 
deserters, two of whom had been left sick at Mineola and afterward 
sent to Fort Hamilton, New York. Ten have been discharged for 
disability (one at Concord, N. II.: French of F) . Three officers 
have passed away: Lieut. Wiggin of H (killed at Pinckney Island, 
21st), Lieut. Thompson of Co. I (Acting Commissary, 27th, of 
disease), and Lieut. Scruton of K (died at Salmon Falls, N. H., 
the I'Sth, of wounds received at James Island, 16th June). 

Absent sick : 2 officers of C, and 1 Field and Staff. Co. C has 
also two men reported as prisoners of war. 

ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 

Sergeants 5555555555 

Corporals 86788 8 888 8 

Prisoners of War ... 2 36 38 

Desei'ted 5 

Died of disease .... 10 

Discharged for disability 10 

Absent sick 71 

Detached 18 

Present sick 153 



SKPXKIVIBER, 1862. 




g^ EPTP3IBER was ushered in by the detailing of several 

1^^ men from our regiment as carpenters to do hammer and 
saw service in the (Quartermaster's Department, their 
labors to result in houses for the negroes. The detail 
was : Barrett of E, Toothaker of F, and Davis of K. 

2d Lieut. Smith was ordered from Co. E to Co. A 
^0 on the 1st, probably to take Lieut. Hynes' place, Acting 
'^""^ Commissary. Our Band (not ours now!) went home on the 
Star of the South. Shall we record that the boys wept? TVe 
realized as we saw them depart that music did indeed have charms. 
A diary says, "Only 20 of F on duty." Mail. 

Gen. Hunter and Staff went North on the 5th on the McCMlan, 
really en route to Washington, probably for consultation, though a 
diary says he was "ordered." Our (Quartermaster, Nesmith, went 
on same steamer on leave of absence. Lieut. Hynes was appointed 
on the 7th to act as Regimental (Quartermaster during Nesmith's 
absence. The command of the Department was turned over to Brig.- 
Gen. J. M. Brannan. Mail. 

Dr. A. J. H. Buzzell arrived on the 7th, on the St. Marij. He 
was our new Assistant Surgeon (under new order of the War Depart- 
ment) ; and a "right good one" he proved to be, as will be seen 
later on. He found the regiment in a sickly condition, with 500 sick 
and off duty. 

Tlie Xew York Herald of the 6th said that the draft in New 
Hampshire had been postponed till the 15th. 

On the 7th the Chaplain recorded that "we could not raise 200 
men for parade." On the 7th also, a regimental order appointed 
Maj. Plimpton to take cognizance of smaller offences, liable to trial 
by a regimental or garrison court-martial, and ordered that offenders 
be brought before him. 

On the 8th, sickness had become so prevalent that something 
unusual was done in our case, the regiment being excused from any 
outside duty for one month. Anotlier unusual item of the 8th was that 
Gen. Brannan, Commanding Department, ordered a small detachment 
of the Seventh New Hampshire, under Corpl. Cogswell, to be tempora- 
rily assigned to the Third New Hampshire. 

The relieved guards were ordered by Maj. Plimpton, Command- 
ing Regiment (9th) to discharge their pieces at a target on the beach. 

(211) 



•212 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Sept. '62. 

Bayonet drill was inaugurated on the 10th, and there was more 
fun to the square foot, in consequence, than we had had for months. 
Teaching a fancy dance would have been as nothing compared with it. 

The events of the 11th were, that Gen. Brannau ordered a regu- 
lar system of target practice, and the Chaplain boils down the con- 
dition of self and regiment thus: " Not very well; men poorlj- ; reg- 
iment bad oft." 

We were inspected on the 12th ; but the inspector, Capt. Jackson 
of the Regular Arnw, was fastidious and the regiment a little "off," 
for various uncontrollable reasons ; and the inspector didn't complete 
his work. Mail. About 100 recruits, under Capt. Allen, and a 
batch of commissions on the 12th, as follows : — 

1st Lieut. Maxwell . . to Captaui (assigned to D). 
" " Allen . . . . " " " " C (relieving Fogg). 

Butterfiekl . . " •' " " K. 

2d Lieut. Fogg . . . . "1st Lieutenant " '• B (from C). 

Cody ...."" " " " C (absent). 

Smith . . . ■' " " " '• K. 

1st Sergt. Jonah Libby, Jr., " 2d Lieutenant " " B. 

" Henry F. Hopkins " " " " " H. 

" " J. J. Donohoe " " " " " C. 

Capt. Ela was transferred to E from K, and Capt. Ayer was 
transferred to H. 

The 2d Lieutenants' commissions caused many changes in the 
non-commissioned officers ; among them : — 

Private George C. Harris of H to 1st Sergeant. 

Sergt. JohnH. Thing " B " " 

Corpl. S. N. Lamprey " B " Sergeant. 

Private John Broadbent " B " Corporal. 

Eli Tompkins " B " 

A. S. Currier " B " 

" E. M. Kempton " B 

Sergt. John Kirwin " C "1st Sergeant. 

Corpl. John Casey " C " Sergeant. 

Private John Keating " C " Corporal. 

Charles Hall " C " 

The first mention of yellow fever found by the writer was on the 
12th, and was connected with the death of a Fourth New Hampshire 
man at Hilton Head. 

The Chaplain mentioned on the 13 th that he put up a place for 
worship, sent home the effects of four deceased soldiers and spent 
considerable time with the new recruits. 

It appears that on the 13th Maj. Plimpton was in command, 
for he it was who issued the orders for promotion of nearly all above 
named. Col. Jackson must have been ill, for he was on duty the 
14th and selected the names of another detail to go North on recruiting 
service. ' The detail was ordered on the 15th and was as follows : — 
Lieut. Henry C. Handerson. 
Sergt. Converse D. McDonald of E. 
" Leonard F. Place " I. 

" Thomas Casey " C. 

Private Alex'r La Mudge " H. 

Wm. Ladd Dodge " D. 

" Thomas Hanson " A. 



>i. r>2.^ 



THIRD NEW HAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 



213 



They were ordered to report to Lieut. Col. Seth Eastman, Supt. 
of Volunteer Recruiting Service at Concord, N. H. "Lucky dogs !" 
exclaimed we all. Lieut. Cornelius was by same order relieved from 
duty at Concord and ordered to report to the regiment. There was 
some trouble with the recruits just arrived, not only evident by the 
Chaplain's efforts, but also evidenced by an order from Gen. Brannau, 
Commanding Department, that all recruits be examined by the sur- 
geons within three days after arrival. 

The event of the 15th was the arrival of the Arago, bringing 
Gen. Mitchel and staff and a large mail. Gen. Mitchel came to 
take charge of the Department. He assumed command the 17th (by 
General Order 40) and announced his staff : — 



Maj.W. P. Prentice 
Lieut. B. Birch . . 
'• F. A. Mitchel 
" ,T. C. Williams 
Israel R. Sealj' 
Capt. E. W. Mitchel 



Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Start". 
Aide-de-Camp. 

(his son). 



Forty-seventh New York, Actina; Asst.Adjt.-Gen. 
Assistant Quartermaster (his son), temporarilj^ 
assigned to duty as Assistant Aide-de-Camp on 
the Staff. 

The Confederate Gen. Beauregard assumed command, at Charles- 
ton, on the 15th, of the States of South Carolina and Georgia, 
and said the forces were as follows : South 
Carolina : infantry, 6,564 ; artillery in po- 
sition, 1,787; field artillery, 1,379; cav- 
alry, 2,817 : total, 12,547. Georgia : total, 
7,189. Aggregate, 24 Sept., 19,^736. 

Our recruits again. The 16th a Board 
of Inspectoi's was appointed for each of 
the regiments which had received recruits. 
Our regimental Board was Capt. Raudlett, 
Assistant Surgeon P^aton, Capt. Wilbur and 
Capt. Ela. 

A Sept. 8th letter to the 3Ianc]i ester 
Mirror (published 16th Sept.), sheds light 
on several matters. It says: "Of the 
three men of Co. H wounded 21 Aug., two 
have died .... Dr. Buzzell, recently ap- 
pointed, has arrived and went on duty at 
once .... a general court-martial is in 
session at Beaufort, and Col. Jackson is 
on duty with it ... . Bedel is recover- 
ing from a severe illness. Maj. Plimpton 
is temporarily in command .... quite 
a number discharged for disability lately 
.... 22 commissions now due the regi- 
ment." [This was written before the arrival of several commissions 
about the 12th.— D. E.] 

Gen. Mitchel assumed command of the Department on the 17th, 
and inspected the Third New Hampshire on the 19th and made a 
speech to us. In the evening the Fourth New Hampshire Band (Why 
had this band not gone home?) serenaded Col. Jackson. 




COTTON. 



214 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Sept. '62. 

Our recruiting party left us ou the Aragu on the 20th, with the 
best wishes of all. One of the first acts of Gen. Mitchel was to 
direct Col. Brown, Third Rhode Island (20 Sept.), to relieve Col. 
Guss, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, as Commander of the Post of 
Hilton Head. About this time there was a movement directed 
against Chaplains as a body. (See the Chaplain's Personal.) 

The 22d of Sept. 1862 was a memorable one, for on that day 
President Lincoln issued his famous Emancipation Proclamation, to 
take effect Jan. 1 next. The following words occur in it : " . . . . 
all persons held as slaves within any State or any designated part of 
a State, of which the people thereof shall be then (1 Jan. 1863) in 
rebellion against the United States, shall be then, thenceforward and 
forever free " 

The Savannah Republiran of the 24th called for "Lead ! Lead !" 
the several donations to be marked "Lead for the Government." 
It said : " Many families have enough when moulded into bullets to 
put a company of Yankees to flight," and added: "The citizens of 
Charleston have furnished sixty thousand pounds." 

On the 25th it is recorded that we had another (small) lot of 
recruits. Ou same date the War Department issued a General Order 
which is very instructive, and the writer thinks it too good to be 
omitted. It was in regard to exchanges of prisoners, and was the 
result of an agreement of 22 July 1862. The exchanges were to 
be — 

Man for man. 

Officer for officer- — lower for higher grades. 

General in Chief or Admiral, for 60 privates or seamen. 

Major-General or Flag Officer, for 40 privates or seamen. 

Brigadier-General or Commodore with broad pennant, for 20 privates 

or seamen. 
Colonel or Captain in Navy, for 15 privates or seamen. 
Lieutenant-Colonels or Commander in Navy, for 10 privates or seamen. 
Major or Lieutenant-Commander in Navy, for 8 privates or seamen. 
Lieutenant or Ensign or Mastei''s Mate in Navy, for 4 privates or seamen. 
Midshipman, Warrant Officers in Navy, Masters of Merchant Vessels 

and Commanders of Privateers, for 3 privates or seamen. 
Non-commissioned Officers, Arn)y or Navy, for 2 privates or seamen. 

We may add that the agreement was made between Maj.-Gen. 
John A. Dix, U. S. A., and Maj.-Gen. D. H. Hill, C. S. A. Cheer 
up non-coms., for here is a War Department order that declares you 
to be worth two privates or seamen ! 

Again the recruits. A letter to Manchester Mirror dated 20 
Sept., and published 25th, says: "General Order 91, War Depart- 
ment, Adjutant-General's Office, requires Chaplains to be examined 
.... Capt. Allen of Co. C has arrived here at last, with about 75 
recruits, seven of whom were rejected. Their long stay in New York 
did them no good .... the barracks for Cos. A and I are now in 
process (provost guard) .... 30 or 40 sick men have been sent 
to the General Hospital within a month, to relieve the Regimental 
Hospital. Only death since last letter, Thomas L. Rich, Co. 
A . . . ." 



S(q:>t. '62.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 215 

Times had changed. Gen. Hunter had gone North. Gen. 
Mitchel was now in command. On the 26th, he directed that all 
enlisted men who had been acting as officers in the colored regiment 
(First South Carolina Volunteers) return at once to their regiments. 
Officers were over-staying their leaves of absence to such an extent 
that Gen. Mitchel made an attempt to stop it by ordering, on the 
27th, a Board to " sit" on such cases. Capt. Ela of the Third New 
Hampshire was the regiment's only representative on the Board. 

Admiral DuPont left on the 27th, having been summoned to 
Washington. That probably meant a change in commanding ofHcers 
of the naval forces in the Department. 

The month closed by a raid of a portion of the Forty-eighth 
New York from Fort Pulaski (on the 30tli), resulting in the 
destruction of a lot of valuable salt works near Bluffton. 



SUPPLEMENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 123 of the 3d created the 10th Army Corps (all 
of the Department of the South) and assigned Gen. O. M. Mitchel 
to its command (he assumed the command the 17th). General Order 
126 of the 6th amended previous orders as to organization of regi- 
ments and companies of infantry : A regiment of infantry — 10 com- 
panies — to have 1 colonel, 1 lieutenant-colonel, 1 major, 1 adjutant 
(an extra lieutenant), 1 quartermaster (an extra lieutenant), 1 
chaplain, 1 surgeon, 2 assistant surgeons ; non-commissioned staff : 
1 sergeant-major, 1 quartermaster sergeant, 1 commissary sergeant, 
1 hospital steward. A company to have 1 captain, 1 1st lieutenant, 
1 2d lieutenant, 1 1st sergeant, 4 sergeants, 8 corporals, 2 musicians, 
1 wagoner, 64 privates — minimum, 82 privates — maximum. 

(Under this order our Principal Musician, Gove, was discharged. 
See later.) 

This order said, as there was no law authorizing mhsicians for 
companies, that two musicians might be enlisted for each company 
and be paid and rated as privates. 

General Order 130 of the 14th called attention to the necessity 
of reducing baggage. Officers to be permitted to carry mess chests 
and a valise or carpet bag. No trunks or boxes to be allowed in the 
baggage trains. Privates to carry no more carpet bags( !) and boxes 
in regimental wagons. Sutlers' goods to be carried no more in 
regimental wagons. 

General Order 140 of the 24th created the Provost IMarshal 
General's office (as a sort of a bureau of the War Department). 

General Order 141 of the 25th (a proclamation by the Presi- 
dent) said : ". . . . all persons discouraging volunteer enlistments, 
resisting military drafts, or guilty of any disloyal practice, affording 
aid and comfort to the rebels against the authority of the United 



216 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Sept.'62. 

States, shall be subject to martial law and liable to trial and pun- 
ishment by court-martial or military commission. The writ of 
habeas corpus is suspended in respect to all persons arrested or who 
are now, or hereafter during the rebellion, shall be imprisoned in 
any fort, camp, arsenal, military prison or other place of confinement 
by any military authority, or by the sentence of any court-martial 
or military commission." 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 36 of the 5th was the order by Brig. -Gen. J. M. 
Branuan, assuming command of the Department, in obedience (as 
he said) to orders from Ma j. -Gen. Hunter. 

General Order 38 of the 11th directed that target practice begin 
at once. A circular (no number) of the 13th dii'ected that all re- 
cruits received for regiments in the Department be inspected by the 
regimental commander and surgeon on the third day after arrival. 

General Order 40 of the 17th was Gen. Mitchel's order assuming 
command of the Department, relieving Gen. Brannan. 

General Order 42 of the 26th directed that men of the volunteer 
regiments (white), who had been serving as officers in the First South 
Carolina (colored) rejoin their own regiments at once. 

General Order 43 of the 27th ordered a commission to examine 
into the cases of officers who had returned to the Department after 
having overstayed their leaves of absence. 



The Department Statistics for September are : Troops, 13,837 ; 
wounded and sick, 3,623 ; died, 68 ; cases of wounded and sick, 58 ; 
died of wounds, etc., 1. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and Staff 5 men, 10 officers. 

Co. A 90 " 2 

B 95 " 3 

C 86 " 3 

D 81 " 3 

E 89 " 2 

F 98 " 3 

G 73 " 3 

H 71 " 2 

I 90 " 1 

K 77 " 2 

Present aggregate .... 898 

Aggregate last report . . . 8G5 

The Band had been discharged, entailing a loss of Leader 
Gustavus W. Ingalls and 6 first-class, 6 second-class and 7 third- 
class musicians : total, 20. The missing ones to make up the 
original number had been previous!}^ discharged. 

Recruits have been received as follows: A, 11 ; B, 14 ; C, 8 ; 
D, ; E, 5 ; F, 20 ; G, 1 ; H, 4 ; I, 22 ; K, : total, 85. 

There have been discharged for disabilit}^: Moody A. Sawyer, 
Hospital Steward ; H. B. Wing, Principal Musician. 



Sept. '62.'\ 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



21' 



Three 1st sergeants, — Touah Libby, Jr., of B, Henry F. Hopkins 
of H and J. J. Donohoe of C — have received commissions as 2d 
lieutenants. 

Wagoner Hackett of C has been discharged, by an order. 

2d Lieuts. Fogg and Cody have been promoted to 1st lieutenants, 
and 1st Lieuts. Allen and Maxwell to Captains. 

Asst. Surgeon Buzzell and 2d Asst. Surgeon Farrar joined 
during the month, the former having been appointed under the new 
order of the War Department, authorizing two assistant surgeons to 
a regiment instead of one, and the latter in advance of an expected 
vacancy. 









A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F G H I 


K 


Totals. 


Sergeants 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 5 5 5 


5 




Corporals . . . 






8 


8 


s 


8 


8 


8 8 5 8 


8 




Musicians . . . 






2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 2 2 


2 




Absent sick . . 




















■18 


Detached . . . 




















20 


Prisoners of war 












2 








3G 





38 


Officers detached 






1 








2 





10 1 





5 


Present sick 




















96 


Absent in arrest 






1 














2 2 





5 


Recruits received 






11 


u 


8 





5 


20 1 4 22 





85 


Discharged for disability 


2 


3 


") 


2 


1 


7 2 2 r, 


2 


32 


Died of disease . 






1 





2 








111 





6 




CHEVRONS, ETC. 



V 



CORPORAL 







aw SER(^T. SERGT MAJ. p/?in.mu: 




SERtT 





PRIN. MUS 18^0 



COIVI.SEKGT (^(jLOR 5EK&T 






V 



H0SP.5r£lV/ll?D COLOR CORPL. 



FIRST SERGT. 



COM SERGT 1890 





X 



SIGAI/IL CORPS 



PIONEER CORPL. P(0/y£EK COKPS 



(218) 



OCTOBER, 1862. 




HE first item of interest in October was the discharge of 
Assistant Surgeon Eaton, for disability, on the 1st. 
The salt works (see 30 Sept.) were actually destroyed 
the same day. 

On the 3d Gen. Mitchel ordered the formation of a 
new brigade, to be called the Second Brigade of the 10th 
Army Corps, and to be composed of the following troops : 
Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, Col. Guss ; Seventh Connec- 
ticut, Col. Hawley ; Third New Hampshire, Col. Jackson ; Seventy- 
sixth Pennsylvania, Capt. Strawbridge. The brigade was relieved 
from orders of the Commander of the Post of Hilton Head. Gen. 
Terry was assigned to the new brigade. A letter of the 3d to the 
Xeiv York Times said: "The present negro quarters — a long row 
of partitions into which are crowded young and old, male and 
female, without respect to quantity or quality, such has thus far been 
the necessity — having become a sort of Five Points, half st^^e, half 
brothel, the Major-General has ordered them to be removed outside ; 
and accordingly a piece of ground has been selected near Drayton's 
Plantation, about two miles off, for a negro village. The negroes 
are to be made to build their own homes .... a teacher has been 
provided .... to be paid by the Quartermaster's Department." 

Gen. Terry assumed conunand of the new brigade on the 4th, 
announcing his Staff as follows : Capt. Bacon, Seventh Connecticut, 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General; Lieut. Terry (Gen. Terry's 
brother) , Seventh Connecticut, and Lieut. James, Third Rhode Is- 
land, as Aide-de-Camps. A flag-staff' was raised the same day in 
front of the Colonel's tent. 

We had a special muster on the 5th, apparently by an order 
from the Provost Marshal, Maj. G. B. Van Brunt ; but its exact im- 
port is obscure. 

Our 30 days' exemption from outside duty expired on the 8th. 
On the 0th Capt. Emmons and Lieut. Jonah Libb}^ Jr., got 
leaves of absence for 30 days, though Capt. Emmons did not turn 
over the company property to Lieut. T. M. Jackson till the 13th. 
A general order from War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, of 
the 9th, authorized oflficers of the regular ai'my to enlist volunteers 

(219) 



220 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. I0rt.'62. 

to fill the ranks of their commands to the legal standard, and such 
enlistments might be for three full years or for the unexpired terms. 

The negro church was formally dedicated on the 12th, the Rev. 
H. N. Hudson of the Engineer regiment conducting the exercises. 
Gen. Mitchel was present and addressed the assemblage. Mail. 

Another mail of 15th was an important one, for it contained 
nine new commissions for our regiment. The list was as follows : — 

1st Lieut. Biiruham to be Captain. 

*' " Aver " 

2cl " Marsh " 1st Lieutenant. 

" " T. M. Jackson " 

1st Sergt. Houghton of A, " 2d 

Wadlia " G, " " 

1st " Stearns " F, " " " 

Head " B, " " 

1st " Hawkins " I, " " 

These were announced on the 15th; and within a few days 
thereafter the following changes, among others, were made among 
the enlisted men : — 

Sergt. Geo. P. Nutting of E, to 1st Sergeant {vice Fogg, resigned). 

Corpl. Royal Scales " E, " Sergeant {rice Nutting, promoted). 

Private W. S. Abbott " E, " Corporal (r('c'? Scales, promoted). 

Sergt. Button " F, " 1st Sergeant (r/r^^ Stearns, com'd). 

Corpl. Ackerman " F, " Sergeant. 

McCoy " F, " 

Private Stetson " F, " Corporal. 

Corpl. Ernerson " G, " Sergeant. 

Private Paris " G, " Corporal. 

" Cassidy " G, " 

Corpl. Edgell " G, " Sergeant. 



Burley 
" Robinson 

Private Chapman 
" Gerrish 

Sergt. Parker 



Corporal. 
Corporal. 
1st Sergeant. 



Corpl. Evans " A, " Sergeant. 

Private Coftee " A, " Corporal. 

Sergt. Morrill " A, " 1st Sergeant. 

Corpl. Giddings " B, " Sergeant. 

" Morrison " B, " " 

Private Edminster " B, " Corporal. 

Cos. A and I were relieved from Provost Guard on the 16th and 
rejoined the regiment, and received the following highly complimen- 
tary letter : — 

LETTER TO CAPTS. CLARK AND BURNHAM (COS. A. AND I), 
ON liEING RELIEVED FROM PROVOST DUTY. 

16 Oct. 1802. 
Sirs : Military necessity having again compelled the breaking up of 
old associations, by directing the return to their regiment of your com- 
mands, I cannot allow the opportunity to pass without expressing to you, 
and through you to the officers and non-commissioned officers and privates 
of your companies, my most heartfelt thanks for the very courteous and 

prompt manner in which my orders have ever been obeyed I shall 

ever look back to my connection and association Avith the Third New Hamp- 
shire, as represented by yourselves and commands, as one of the green 



Oct. '62.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 221 

spots of ni}' life That yon will always accjuit yourselves with credit 

when called on the battle-field, James Island can testify ; that yon can l^e en- 
trusted with intricate, onerous and unpleasant duties, it is only necessary 

to advert to the time spent as Provost Guard at Port Royal 

G. B. Van Brunt, 
Maj. Forty-seventh New York Vols., Provost 31arshal. 

There were only seven companies on parade on the 17th. Pay- 
rolls were being signed the 17th. 

A diary of the 18th said: "The allotment took effect today, 
when paid off, and some didn't get a cent." The Netv South of the 
18th gave the following as a complete roster of the Third New 
Hampshire olHcers : — 

ROSTER OF THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE OFFICERS. 

[New South, 18 Oct. 18G2.] 
Col. Jackson, Adjt. Libby, Asst. Surg. Buzzell, 



Co. I 



Lieut.-Col. 


Bedel, 


Q- 


M. 


Nesmith, 


.1 


Farrar, 


Maj. 


Plimpton, 


Surg. 


Moulton, 


Chaplain 


Hill. 


A : Capt 


. Claris, 


1st Lieut. Hynes, 


2d Lieut. Houghton 


B: 


Wilbun, 






Fogg, 


" " 


Libby, Jr., 


C: 


Allen, 






Cody, 


" 


Donohoe, 


D: 


Maxwell, 






Cornelius, 


" 


Head, 


E: 


Ela, 






Dearborn, 


.. 


Flanders, 


F: 


Randlett, 






Marsh, 




Stearns. 


G: 


Emmons, 






Handerson, 




Wadlia, 


H: 


Ayer, 






Jackson, 


" 


Hopkins, 


I: 


Burnham, 






Dow, 


" '• 


Place, 


K: 


Butterfleld, 






Smith. 


" 


Hawkins. 



Gen. Mitchel gave a sort of reception on Sunday, the 19th, to 
the officers ; and so many of ours attended that we had no parade. 

We had marching orders on the 20th, attended by the usual bus- 
tle, and on the 21st we marched to the wharf. Capt. Ela was 
directed to assume command of our camp while the men were away. 
This expedition was to go to Pocotaligo, on the mainland, a station 
on the railroad between Savannah and Charleston. The purpose was 
to cut the communication, burn the railroad bridge, destroy a portion 
of the track and retire. This in brief was the j^i'ogramme. The 
troops were put on board the various craft during the afternoon and 
early evening, and at various hours of the night started up the 
(Broad) river. The troops were scattered about the fleet, some be- 
ing on the gunboats. Co. F was divided thus : the fii'st platoon on 
the gunboat Uncas, and the second on the gunboat Patroon. Other 
distributions and other troops will appear later on. The troops were 
provided before starting with a small parcel of pitehwood splinters 
and a bunch of matches. The writer will make no attempt to give 
an account of this expedition in one continuous story, but will serve 
it up as he finds it furnished by different persons and from different 
standpoints. In fact, the writer was not present, being on duty at 
the camp. The regiment went practically as a large detail, as will 
be seen by the number of men. They had five days' rations and 
100 rounds. 



222 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. I0ct.'62. 

POCOTALIGO, 22 OCT. 1862. 

The following account is by L. N. J. of Co. F : — 
We landed at Mackay's Point at 7 a.m., and waited for tlie rest of ttie 
troops. Started about 9 a.:m. Nearly every man in tlie Third New Hamp- 
shire had a bundle of pitchAvood to set Are to the railroad bridge. Over 
3,000 troops, 2 field pieces and 2 howitzers. The howitzers by sailors from 
Wahash. The Third New Hampshire was last but two in the line The 
Forty-seventh New Yorlv and the artillery had the advance. Reached enemy 
about 1 P.M., and opened fire on them with artillery, about five miles from 
the landing. The rebs fell back a mile, and made a stand on further side of 
the marsh, with artillery and infantry. Only a narrow road across the 
marsh. Our artillery was placed this side the marsh in a potato field; the 
infantry in the Avoods in front. The Third Ncav Hampshire supported the 
battery. The shot and shell Avere tlying in all directions. Only two or three 
of Third Ncav Hampshire wounded — one of Co. F slightly. The rebs held 
their position till the Fourth NeAv Hampshire charged them, when they re- 
treated, leaving some ammunition. Our troops foUoAved. Third Ncav 
Hampshire advanced to within a short distance of the railroad, Avhen we 
took a position in a road to the left of the main road, to check a possible 
flank movement. The other troops folloAved them up, driving them about 
three miles, fighting every inch of the way. The rebs then retreated across 
a creek, and destroyed the bridge over it. Our artillery got out of ammuni- 
tion ; but the infantry fought until dark, when the enemy got reinforced. 
Seeing that the object of the expedition could not be accomplished, the 
troops fell back to the boats. We Avere about 12 miles from the boats at 
the close of the fight. The ambulances were fcAv, and Ave had to carry 
wounded in blankets, on boards, etc. When Ave got Avithin 3 miles of the 
boats, Co. F Avas sent back for the dead and wounded. Nearly morning be- 
fore Co. F all got in. Enemy was driven about G miles in all. At Mackay's 
Point all night. 

The troops landed in the early morning. The Third New Hamp- 
shire were almost the last to land. Marched nearly five miles before 
a shot was fired. In a little while the Third New Hampshire was 
ordered up to support the battery, Avhich was actively engaged at 
the front. Regiment ordered to lie low : they did. After the artil- 
lery had fired about half an hour, the Third New Hampshire was or- 
dered forward with fixed bayonets. They rushed forward, across a 
field and into the woods, passing over and among the rebels and 
Union wounded and dead. Forward again, the Third New Hamp- 
shire on one side of the road and a Pennsylvania regiment on the 
other. Advanced about two-thirds of a mile, and Third New Hamp- 
shire ordered into a by-path to prevent flanking. Soon after, general 
retreat. Co. D and part of A returned on the Patroon. 

Here is another account, but particularly applying to a certain 
part of the experiences of the troops : — 

The night before the action, a detail of eight men from Co. B 
and 117 in all from the A^arious regiments, went up Broad River, 
under Capt. Gray of the Seventli Connecticut, in two launches, Lieut. 
Phenix and Lieut. Pearson, both of the NaA-y, each having charge of 
a launch. Past Midshipman Stetson was also one of the party. Each 
boat had a negro guide. The leading launch, under Lieut. Phenix, 
had a boat howitzer. Both went up Broad River a considerable dis- 
tance, despite the fact that the negro guides insisted that the launches 



Oct. '(52.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 223 

had passed the desu'ed point of landing. Pearson suggested to Phe- 
nix that the point had been passed, bnt received in reply: "Who's 
in command? It's your duty to follow." After rowing further, 
Phenix himself became alarmed and ventured to ask Pearson wliere 
he thought they were ; to which Pearson had the temerity to suggest 
that he was only to follow where Phenix led. Phenix then directed 
Pearson's and his own boat turned about and Pearson's to lead. 
They rowed a long time, for they had gone far away from and be- 
yond the particular place they were to land. At near daybreak they 
arrived at the place, but did not actually land. The fleet soon came 
along and the two boats proceeded with them. The evident design 
of the expedition of the two boats was to capture rebel pickets at 
the causeway, near where the action afterward took place. Undoubt- 
edly the failure of the plan arranged for the two boats contributed 
largelv to the non-success of the whole movement. 



A private letter says : " We had a hard fight and whipped the 
enemy out of three different positions and drove them back to the 
line of the Charleston & Savannah Railroad, about five miles, when 
it became dark and the contest ended. The ground was desperately 
disputed the whole way. Co. H was joined with Co. I, and the two 
were commanded by Capt. Burnham. Capt. A3'er commanded Co. 
B, which was filled up by Co. G men. Co. B Avas the color company 
for the time being. Capt. Wilbur was in camp at Hilton Head. 
Lieut. Fogg was at one part of the fight sent to assist Capt. Butter- 
field of Co. K. One man in Co. E lost his left hand. Our regiment, 
owing to accident of position, escaped with very little injury." 

The bunches of matches and the neat parcels of pitchwood were 
not used as intended. 

The Historian of the Sixth Connecticut says of this expedition : 
"There were 4,r)00 troops, viz.: Sixth Connecticut, Fourtii New 
Hampshire and Forty-seventh New York, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania, 
under Col. Chatfield ; Seventh Connecticut, Seventy-sixth Pennsyl- 
vania, Third New Hampshire, and tars from the Wabash^ under Gen. 
Terry. The Sixth Connecticut loss was given as 5 killed, 29 wounded 
and 3 missing." 

Only 3 men were wounded in the Third New Hampshire : Corpl. 
Warren S. Abbott, Co. P^, in hand; Private Geo. W. Flanders, Co. 
F, in hand ; Musician John W. Morse, Co. G, in hand. 

The Third New Hampshire is mentioned in Gen. Terry's official 
report. He reported in substance as follows : 480 officers and men 
of the Third New Hampshire, organized as six companies [to equal- 
ize. — D. E.] under Col. John H. Jackson, the regiment on the Boston 
and the gunboats Patroon and Uncas. Between 9 and 10 in the 
evening (21st), he received a verbal order from Gen. Brannan to de- 
tail 107 officers and men to embark in the boats of the men-of-war, 
and to proceed to and beyond Mackay's Poiut and endeavor to cap- 
ture the enemy's outposts in that vicinity. He detailed 2 officers and 
75 men from the Seventh Connecticut, and 2 officers and 32 men 
from the Third New Hampshire. Capt. Gray of the Seventh Con- 



224 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. lOct. '62. 

necticut, with 95 men, was directed to proceed up Broad River be- 
yond Mackay's Point, and land in the rear of the pickets and cut 
off their retreat in the direction of Pocotaligo. The other 12 men, 
under Lieut. S. M. Smith, Third New Hampshire, were directed to 
proceed up the Pocotaligo River and capture the pickets on Bray's 
Island. [Capt. Graj' was unsuccessful. Lieut. Smith captured one 
lieutenant and three men, with their horses. See his report else- 
where.] The Boston, on which were Gen. Terry's Headquarters, 
did not arrive till nearly 8 a.m., 22d. Put his own brigade forward 
(not in front), preceded by Lieut. Henry's battery and a naval bat- 
ery iinder Lieut. Phenix. These were followed by the Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania and Seventh Connecticut, Third New Hampshire and 
New York ICugineers (several vessels had not yet landed their troops) . 
Gen. Terry's Brigade soon united with the First Brigade, and then 
Lieut. Henry's battery was exchanged for Lieut. Gitting's batter^-, 
and a company of the Third Rhode Island Artillery was assigned to 
duty with the boat howitzers. The whole column was then put in 
motion, but was soon halted by Gen. Brannan's orders, who also 
directed pickets thrown out and await his arrival. Tliis halt was 
made some two and a half or three miles from the landing. On 
Gen. Bran.nan's arrival the whole force advanced by Hank. Ap- 
proaching " Frampton's," artillery was heard in front, and Gen. Terry 
soon received orders to form column and move forward at double- 
quick to support First Brigade, then engaged. He here detailed half 
a company of the Seventh Connecticut as a hospital guard, and the 
other half, under Capt. Tourtellotte, he assigned to assist in serving 
the boat howitzers. Then Gen. Brannan directed, and Gen. Terry 
sent the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania (his leading regiment) into the 
woods 200 yards to left of road, to protect left flank of first line, 
and the Seventh Connecticut and Third New Hampshire were deployed 
on the right and left, immediatel}" in rear of the batteries, which were 
rapidly firing. The brigade remained here some time, the men lying- 
down and escaping serious injury. Again Gen. Terry, by orders 
from Gen. Brannan, moved forward a short distance beyond the guns, 
while a charge upon the battery in our front was executed by troops 
of the First Brigade. The enemy being driven from their position, 
Gen. Terry was again ordered to advance his line, and tried to do so, 
but was unable to do it in line,, owing to the woods and marsh. He 
did so by a flank into the road, after passing over which (causeway) 
he again brought his brigade into column, the Third New Hampshire 
and Seventh Connecticut being on the right of the road and the 
Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania on the left. On being ordered to send a 
regiment to the front double-quick, Gen. Terry sent the Seventy- 
sixth Pennsylvania, and then Gen. Terry went personally and posted 
the Third New Hampsliire and one boat howitzer in a position desig- 
nated by Gen. Brannan. "Having accomplished this," says Gen. 
Terry, "and coming to the front, I found the Seventy-sixth Penn- 
sylvania and Seventh Connecticut already deployed on the left and 
right of the road just Avithin the edge of the wood which borders the 



■ 


^ 


Ejt r*t t 




uk -M 




\i.''^ i 


HB 




Capt. Rukus F. Clauk. 



Capt. Charles F. Dunbau. 




W^'^'iM 


J 


^^^ 


•r 


^^^HP^s&^ 


k? 



LiKUT. AxuKKW J. Fogg. 



Capt. AxDincw J. Wadi.ia. 



Oct. '62.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 225 

marshy banks of the Pocotaligo River, beyond which the enemy had 
taken position, the batteries being on the road a little in advance of 
the line." 

" 8oon after my arrival," says Gen. Terry, " our artillery fire 
was much slackened, owing to the exhaustion of the ammunition ; 
and the fire of the enemy correspondingly increased." The flank 
companies of Seventh Connecticut (Sharp's breech-loaders) were then 
ordered to open fire, which they quickly did ; and the result was the 
opposing battery was completely silenced. Two companies of Seventy- 
sixth Pennsylvania then arrived. 

About five o'clock Gen. Terry says he. learned from Gen. Bran- 
nan that the bridge had broken down, and that it was impossible to 
follow the enemy further, and that he (Gen. Brannan) had deter- 
mined to withdraw his forces. 

Gen. Terry covered the withdrawal. The Third New Hamp- 
shire, which was still at some distance to the left and rear, in the 
position where Gen. Terry had posted it, was then brought back to 
the road, its right resting upon it ; and the boat howitzer under En- 
sign Wallace, which had accompanied the Third New Hampshire, 
w\as brought to the front, where it discharged the last artillery fire of 
the day. The troops went into bivouac, as if to wait till next da}^ 
and fight again ; but next day re-embarked for Hilton Head. The 
Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania was the last to leave. Gen. Terry made 
favorable mention of Col. Jackson. 

Lieut. 8. M. Smith with a small detail captured several of the 
enemy's pickets, and the following report tells the story : — 

LIEUT. S. M. SMITH'S REPORT. 

Hilton Head, S. C, 25 October 1S(;2. 
Colonel : I have the honor to report that I left the Boston at II p.m., 
with 12 men and a negro guide, to capture a picket post. Went up the river 
by water to within two miles of my destination, landed and reached the rear 
of the picket a little after daybreak. Sent six men to occupy a dyke in the 
rear, to capture any who might escape me, tlien advanced and captured two 
cavalry pickets (one a 1st Lieutenant in ^lorgan's Cavalry). Learning 
tliat two more pickets would soon be in, ordered the dyke guard to let them 
pass in, and stationed the remaining force about the grounds, with orders 
to allow the rebels to enter the line and then capture them, which was done. 
I then embarked and returned to the fleet ; and delivered the prisoners to 
Gen. Brannan, the property (consisting of 3 valuable cavalry horses, -t sets 
cavalry equipments, 2 double-barreled fowling pieces, 1 rifle, 3 cartridge 
boxes and 3 belts) to Capt. Coryell, Quartermaster of Gen. Brannan's Bri- 
gade, by order of Gen. Brannan. My thanks are due Master Orman of the 
gunijoat Paul Jones, who accompanied me with 8 men. 

Your obedient servant, 

S. M. S.MITH, 

John H. Jacicsox, Lieut. Third Beej. JSfew Hampshire Vols. 

Col. Third Berj. Mw Hampshire Vols. 



The following list will be of interest : — 

Gunboat Paul Jones. 

Transport Ben Deford : GOO of Forty-seventh Pennsylvania; 400 

of Fifty-flfth Pennsylvania. 
Gunboat Conemaugh : 850 of Fourth New Hampshire. 



226 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. ^Ort. '62. 

Gunboat Wissahiclcon : 250 of Fourth New Hampshire. 

Transport Boston : 500 of Seventh Connecticut ; 380 of Tliird New 
Hampsliire, Col. Jackson. 

Gunboat Patroon : 50 of Third New Hampshire. 

Gunboat Uncas : 50 of Tlaird New Hampshire. 

Transport Darlington : 306 of Sixtli Connecticut. 

Transport Beliff: 200 of Sixtli Connecticut. 

Gunboat Marhleliead : 230 of Third Rhode Island Artillery. 

Gunboat Vixen : 70 of Third Rhode Island Artillery. 

Transport Flora : 300 of Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. 

Gunboat Water Witch: 130 of Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. 

Armed Transport George Washington : 350 of New York Engineers. 

Armed Steamer Planter .- 450 of Forty-eighth New York and a 
Third Rhode Island Battery. 

Towed, on lighters from Hilton Head; 1 Section of Light Co. E, Third 
U. S. Artillery; 1 Section of Battery H, First IT. S. Artillery. 

Four of ,tbe Drum Corps were with the colors ; the rest, in- 
cluding Spencer, Graham, Morse, Vesey and others, formed a 
stretcher corps. Morse was hit on back of hand very slight. Gra- 
ham hit, injuring his j9a»^s only. Wounded placed on the Ben 
Deford, Boston and Flora. 

The regiment arrived back at camp during the 23d, and resumed 
the usual routine. 

There was great excitement about the Head on the 25th, on ac- 
count of the appearance of the yellow fever. Gen. Mitchel and Staff 
left that day for Beaufort, several of them being sick. 

Gen. Brannan was dii'ected, on the 27th, to assume command of 
the Department during the temporary illness of Gen. Mitchel. Alas 
for poor Gen. Mitchel ! The illness was temporary, to he sure, but 
nevertheless fatal. On same day Co. F was ordered to recover a lot 
of boats belonging to the Pocotaligo expedition ; and the company 
proceeded on the 28th, taking the George Washington at dajdight 
and proceeding up Broad River. The account, by L. N. .J., is as 
follows : — 

Found two at Port Royal Island, then went to Mackay's Point. Shelled 
the rebel picket off and returned to Hilton Head, arriving at 3 p.m. At dark 
was ordered aboard same steamer, and by 9.30 were ready to start. Ran up 
Skull Creek, and anchored off Pope's. At daylight, 29th, went up the river 
again to Mackay's Point. Shelled the rebel pickets, and then ran up the 
Coosawatchie Creek about two miles. The creek there was so narrow, 
didn't go any further. Capt. Randlett in command. Ran back and then up 
the Pocotaligo Creek about six miles. Saw pickets at Stewartson's Place. 
They were lying down and did n't see us till within 100 yards. Our bow 
gun was not bearing on this side, so Ave opened lire with our rifles at first. 
They skedaddled. The bow gun was soon firing at them with grape and 
shell. Some of the boys went ashore and got a few^ trophies. We shelled 
the woods right and left. We were in sight of the battlefield of the 22d. 
Returned to Hilton Head, and were at camp at 5 p.m. (29th). 



A Board of Inspectors was appointed on the 28th to examine 
certain recruits for Third New Hampshire. The following were de- 
tailed : Gen. Terry; Col. Guss, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania ; Col. 
Hawley, Seventli Connecticut ; Col. Jackson, Third New Hampshire, 
and Surg. Scholl, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. The excitement 
caused by the yellow fever had not abated, but rather increased ; and 
if each had had his wish, he 'd have been e?t route to the North 
instanter. 



Oct. '62.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



227 



The Scotia and the Anr/Ua, two irou screw steamers, English 
built, were towed into the harbor the 2.sth by the gunboat Flambean, 
having been captured near Bull's Bay by the bark Restless while at- 
tempting to run the blockade. The cargo of the Scotia alone was 
said to have been worth £135,000 sterling. 
Alas for the scourge ! Capt. Warfield, the 
Post Commissary, died 28th ; and other 
officers were stricken. The funeral cortege 
was in part composed of Companies A and 
I of the Third New Hampshire, and drum- 
mers of the Third New Hampshire, Ninety- 
seventh Pennsylvania and Seventh Connec- 
ticut. 

On the 29 th the yellow fever claimed 
Col. Brown of the Third Rhode Island ; and 
on the 30th, our beloved Gen. Mitchel suc- 
cumbed to the grim monster, at Beaufort 
(see Nov. 1) . Several of his Staff were also 
stricken. The excitement, already great, 
was heightened by the news of Gen. Mitchel's 
death. All the flags were half-masted, and 
a general suspension of active operations eu- 
sued. All were sad. We did not know 
whose turn would be next. The gloom was 
like a pall — heavy, dispiriting, and with hardly a seeming avenue 
of escape. 'T was worse than battle. Give us, said we, a visible, 
tangible enemy, and we will overcome or be overcome ! But this 
invisible, this insidious foe — this yellow-jack, is beyond our com- 
prehension ; and tliough we have no respect for him, we all ac- 
knowledge his superiority and power. 

Department Quartermaster Capt. Elwell died the 30th, and the 
funeral of Col. Brown (Third Rliode Island) occurred same day, the 
drum corps of the Third New Hampshire taking a prominent place in 
the funeral cortege. 

The month closed with everybody sad. 




M/\&NOLIA 




CflEV/lL-DE-FRISE. fO« OfiSTKUCTfOW. 

(Never encountered by Third New Hampshire Volunteers.) 



228 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



iOct. '62. 



SUPPLEIVIENTr, 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 149 of the 2d provided that any person mustered 
into the Corps of Sharpshooters shall have made in five consecutive 
shots, at 200 yards at rest, a string of uot over 25 inches, or the string- 
oft" hand at 100 yards, the certificate of such shots to be written on 
the target used. 

General Order 160 of the 1-Sth provided for army trains and 
baggage :— 



Heacl(inarters train 



for ail army cor[)s .... 
" a division or brigade 
" a full infantry regiment 
" a light artillery battery 
" a squad of cavalry . . 



4: wagons. 
3 



General Order 167 of the 24th directed that a special inventory 
be made of all arms and reported to the Chief of Ordnance. 

General Order 169 of the 27th provided for a special report of 
killed, wounded and missing after each battle. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 46 of the 27th directed Gen. Brannan to take 
command of the Department during the illness of Gen. Mitchel. 
(He died.) ^ 

The Department Statistics for October are : Total troops, 
14,980; wounded and sick, 4,370; died, ()5 ; cases, wounded, etc., 
308; died of wounds, etc., 10. 



Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and Staff 

Co A 


5 m 


B 


. 95 


C 


. 85 


J) 


. 80 


■ E 


. 87 


F 


. 97 


G 


. 71 


H 


. 71 


I 


. 89 


K 


77 



9 officers. 
3 



853 
8G4 



891 

898 



Present aggregate . . . 
Aggregate last report 

There have been nine discharged for disability — one (a 
for G) by order: total discharged, 10. 

Died of disease, 8 ; of wounds, 1 : total died, 9. 



L-ecruit 



Oct. '62.-] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



229 



The following have beeu promoted to 2d Lieuteuaut : — 

1st Serat. R. W. Houghtou of A. 

2cl " J. M. Head " B. 

1st " Geo. Stearns " F. 

2d " A. J. Wadlia " G. 

1st " M. P. Hawkins "I. 

2a " L. F. Place "I. 

Other promotions by commissions have beeu as follows : 

2d Lieut. Dearborn to 1st Lieutenant. 

2d " Marsli '• 1st 

1st " Ayer " Captain. 

2d " Jaclvson '• 1st Lieutenant. 

1st " Burnliam " ... ... Captain. 

2d " Dow " 1st Lieutenant. 

Our Asst. Surgeon Eaton has resigned. 



Sei'geants . . . 
Corporals . . . 
Musicians . . . 
Absent sick . . 
Absent in ari'est 
Detached . . . 
Prisoner of war 
Present sick . . 
Officers detached 
Recruits . . . 



A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G H 


I 


K T 


otals. 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 5 


5 


o 




S 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 6 


8 


8 




?, 


1 


2 


2 


- 


2 


2 2 





2 


35 




















1 1 





1 


3 
2\ 








2 











3fi 








88 
S-t 


1 








1 


1 





1 


1 





5 


1 


■1 


u 


1 





1 


2 




1 


13 



r\ 



y=< 







/\/\ 



M 



7[\ 



A- 






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"NK 






^ 



\/|^/h./l 



^z--- 



/^/"^/N/v/ 



\/\/ 



TROUS-DE-LOUP 
(065TRUCT/0A/.) 
(SHAKPEA/fO SUKES.) 



(Never encountered by Third New Hampshire Vohniteers.) 




NOVKMBER, 18B2. 




HE month opens with an order from Gen. l>rannan, 
^^ Commanding Department, announcing the death of Gen. 
"y\^ Mitchel. The main facts gleaned therefrom were that 



he died at G.20 p.m. on the 30th ult., at Beaufort; 
that he was a graduate of West Point, 1829 ; that he 
took command of a division in the AVest at the breaking out 
of the war. Every post was directed to fire 13 minute guns 
at meridian, and to fly flags at half mast till sunset, and all 
otlicers to wear badge of mourning 30 days. 

On the 2d, which was Sunday, there was a general observance 
of the day in honor of Gen. Mitchel, many regiments having funeral 
services. Sickness continued to be in order, and no doubt the 
yellow fever deaths had a very depressing effect upon those sick 
with other diseases. On the 4th, Co. A was sent to Seabrook for 
a week's tour at Battery Mitchel, in process of construction. (Jn 
the 5th occurred a species of commendable diplomacy on the part of 
Gen. Branuan ; for he then announced the deaths of Col. Brown of 
Third Rhode Island (30 Oct.), Capt. AA^arfield (28 Oct.), and Capt. 
AVilliams, Aide-de-Camp to Gen. Mitchel (29 Oct.), and eulogized 
them. Of the group of officers who died so nearly together, of a 
dread scourge, it Avas eminently proper that the General's death be 
flrst announced, not only in deference to his rank, but to avoid or 
perhaps soften the effect which would undoubtedly have been caused 
had so large a group of deaths been announced in one general order. 

'Twas not till the 6th that Gen. Branuan issued an order con- 
gratulating the troops on their success at Pocotaligo. This is 
further proof, if any were needed, to show that even the officials were 
too busy fighting yellow-jack to attend to routine business. 

The 7th was the anniversary of the taking of Port Royal and 
was duly observed by the firing of salutes at noon from the forts and 
the Wabash. 

On the 8th there were several Third New Hampshire men at 
work on the " big magazine." The weather was getting cooler, and 
the yellow-jack excitement abated accordingly. 

On the 9th, we find the thermometer at 64° at noon. Again 
the yellow fever ! Our regiment furnished Cos. F and D for funeral 
escort on the 10th, to attend the last sad rites over a captain of the 
Ninth Maine, who died of yellow fever. The excitement, partially 
allayed, was again fanned into flame. 

(231) 



232 THIRD NE\Y HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Xov. '62. 

Co. I went to Battery Mitchel on the 11th, relieving Co. A (a 
week's tour). The yellow fever victims were falling one by one. 
Mr. Gould, of the Adams J^xpress Co., died of the dread disease on 
the 14th; and the deaths from that and other causes had become 
so frequent, that an order was issued that day by Gen. Terry, for- 
bidding music or drums to beat by funeral escorts until the escort 
had passed outside the intrenchments. Think for a moment of the 
conditions which led to this order, the wisdom of which could not be 
questioned. There was a duty to the living not to be ignored. This 
was especially true as applied to those who were sick. 'Twas not a 
pleasant or a health-giving sound to them, reminding them, as it did, 
that one more unfortunate had been mustered out and that the next 
funeral might be theirs. We pass to other subjects. 

A diary says, " 14th Nov. : No mail for twenty days." Those 
words, though few in number, meant a great deal to a soldier. We 
were somewhat "rested" on the 15th by a change of subject, in the 
rumor that the famous rebel iron-clad "290" (the Alabama) was 
olT our coast and had become possessed of our mail, and was liable 
at any time to waltz right into the harbor and invite us to a ball. 

President Lincoln, on the 1.5th, invited and enjoined a proper 
observance of the Sabbath, throughout the Armj^ and Navy. The 
loth and 16th were very rough days : sand storms on the land, and 
gales at sea. ' The Massachusetts, which left Hilton Head for New 
York on the 14th, was driven back on the IGth; but put to sea 
again same day, having on board the late Gen. Mitchel's Staff. 

On the 17th, the plan of weekly tours by companies, to Battery 
Mitchel, appears to have been practically changed to a more perma- 
nent basis ; for on that day Gen. Terry apportioned the required 
men to (from) different regiments, the Third New Hampshire being 
ordered to furnish one officer and thirty-one men. 

The same day Col. .Jackson, with the evident intent to properly 
apportion duties, directed that Lieut. -Col. Bedel and Maj. Plimpton 
superintend the company drills each alternate week, beginning then 
with Lieut. -Col. Bedel. 

A mail arrived on the 18th, though we did not get it till full 26 
days since last ; and we had not only a big mail, but a big time 
digesting it (19th). 

Co. I returned on the 18th from Battery Mitchel. 

The mail caused changes in the regiment, among others the 
following : — 

E : Corporal M. P. Donley to Sergeant, rice McDonald, discharged. 
E : Private Geo. W. Benson to Corporal, vice Donley promoted. 
E : Private Orville Goss to Corporal, vice Millett, resigned. 



COL. JACKSON TO GOV. BERRY. 

[In substance. — D. E.] 

Nov. 21, 1862. 

Maj. Plimpton goes by this (mail) steamer to New Hampshire [didn't 

go. — D. E.] to enlist a band for the Second Brigade and to have the men 

of Co. II noAv at Camp Parole forwarded to the regiment, and requests 

the kindly offlces of the Governor in bringing about the latter object. 



JVop. '62.^ THIED NEW HAMPSHIRE EEGIMENT. 233 

Suggests the old instruments now in hands of okl (former) band be turned 
over to Maj. Plimpton. Says Dr. Moulton has been absent over 100 days; 
that the regiment needs about 200 men, and if not recruited voluntarily, 
suggests a draft. Says the Third New Hampshire now has four officers 
in New Hampsliire on recruiting service; but only two are permitted by 
War Department, and wants two sent back. Further says, Lieut. Cornelius 
had been relieved by order from the General commanding the Department, 
and Lieut. Handerson detailed in his stead. That Sergt. Place, now on re- 
cruiting service in New Hampshire, had been promoted to Second Lieutenant 
and ought to return to regiment. 

(A postscript to above, dated 28th, says orders have been receiv- 
ed from Washington for no more officers to be sent on recrniting 
service, and Maj. Plimpton will remain with regiment.) 

Under anthority of an order from War Department, Gen. Brannan 
on the 2 2d convened a Board of Officers to examine volnnteer officers 
as to their capacity, qnalificatious, propriety of conduct, efficiency, 
etc. The Board was made up as follows : Brig. -Gen. Terry, Col. Guss 
(Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania), Col. Jackson (Third New Hamp- 
shire), Col. Strawbridge (Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania), 2d Lieut. 
Huggins (Forty-seventh New York) . The latter is mentioned else- 
where, and under peculiarly interesting circumstances. 

Several frosts had occurred, and we then felt that the sickly 
season was practically over. What a relief ! 

Hilton Head was getting to be quite a place. In proof of this, an 
order of the 23d directed the organization of a Fire Brigade (wholly 
from Forty-seventh New York) ; and in case of fire each regiment to 
send details (Third New Hampshire, seventy privates for Engine 
No. 3). In all there were 4 engines and 1 hook and ladder. As a 
reminder of the President's order (see 15th), we had a sermon, on 
the 23d, by our Chaplain, the first by him in three months though 
that long period was partially caused by his physical inability to 
preach. 

The 24th (Monday) was a sad day for Pi-ivate Lunt of the 9th 
Maine ; for on that day the order was issued for his execution for 
desertion and highway robbery. A full account of the execution, 
which took place 1 Dec, will be found elsewhere. 

Orders arrived on the 25th, from Washington, for no further 
details to be sent North on recruiting service. Apples at Hilton 
Head, $10 per barrel. 

On the 25th, also, Gen. Terry ordered another detail for Battery 
Mitchel and said: "Go tomorrow, prepared to stay a week." This 
would look as if the weekly tour was then being reinstituted. 

What were we doing about that time in matter of drills? On 
the 26th an order said :".... Company drill 8.30 to 10 . . . . ; 
battalion drill, 3 to 4.30 . . . ." 

The 27th was the old-fashioned New England Thanksgiving. How 
did that old custom affect us? We will see. Gen. Saxton (Military 
Governor) appointed the day as a day of Thanksgiving for Freedinen, 
their teachers, and the .superintendents of plantations. At Fort 
Pulaski, where the Fortj'-eighth New York were happily housed, the 
regiment gave a fete and festival on a magnificent scale, inviting prac- 



284 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Nor. '62. 

ticall^' all the offlcers in the Department. Some of our officers went. 
A steamer conveyed the invited guests (Gen. Terry and Staff among 
others) , and returned them at the close of the festivities. We cannot 
afford more space to the Forty-eighth New York than to say they 
"did it up brown." Our Chaplain passed the greater part of the day 
with the man Lnut, to be shot on the following Monday. 

A diary says : " A lonesome day ; salt horse for dinner, rice for 
supper." This man evidently had some liver trouble. Another diary 
says: "Baked beans, greased pig, base ball." This man had a 
quick flow of blood, with tendency to " buoyancy." Another says : 
"Dress parade in the morning, followed by remarks from Col. 
Jackson, a prayer by the Chaplain ; greased pig in the afternoon." 
This man was all right. 

The whiskey question "bobbed up serenely" from many a stand- 
point. On the 28th Gen. Terry issued an order in which he said: 
"Army Kegulatious provide for issue of whiskey only in case of 

exce.ssice fatigue or exposure — not as a reward of labor 

The ordinary fatigue duty of eight hours per day in good weather is not 
more laborious than the duty of the infantry soldier on the march," 
etc. The order provided that officers must be present whenever 
whiskey rations were issued ; that the men's names must be called ; 
that they- must then drink or refuse it ; no one to take it away or 
give it to another ; all such refused whiskey to be turned over to the 
Commissary. Here was a "pretty how do you do." Supposing John 
Smith was a stout, able-bodied man, and his comrade and tent-mate, 
Bill Jones, was a weakly, sickly chap, and John desired to give Bill 
his ration of whiskey. He was debarred from such a kindly act by 
the provisions of the order. By and by, said one, they'll be requiring 
a chap to take the oath of allegiance with each ration of whiskey or 
shoot him if he refuses to swear. Knowiug how very numerous ( !) 
the cases were where soldiers are anxious to give away their whiskey 
ration, it was to be feared that many a hardship would ensue. 

The Chaplain visited Lunt again on the 29th, and prayed with 
him. He says in his diary, "I fear his penitence is not sincere." 
The Chaplain staid with him all night the 30th — his last night on 
earth. A Mr. Butts preached to us on the 30th, in place of our 
Chaplain, who was with Lunt nearly all day. 



SUPPLENIKNT. 

IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 182 of the r)th directed Gen. Burnside to relieve 
Gen. McClellan (Army of the Potomac). 

General Order 189 of the 18th directed that a regimental armorer 
be appointed by (in) all regiments not armed with the Springfield 
rifled musket of 1855-61, and he to be paid extra pay — 40 cents 
per day. (See Regimental Armorer.) 

General Order 193 of the 22d directed the discharge of all per- 
sons who had been arrested for discouraging enlistments, opposing 
draft, etc. 



Xov. '62.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



235 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 47 of the 1st made the sad announcement of the 
death of Gen. Mitchel. 

General Order 50 of the 5th announced other yellow fever deaths : 
Col. Brown, Third Rhode Island Artillery; Capt. Warfield, Depot 
Commissary; Capt. Williams, Aide-de-Camp, of Gen. JMitchel's Staff, 

General Order 51 of the 6th was an order congratulating the 
troops who participated in the action at Pocotaligo, 22d ult. 

General Order 56 of the 24th approved and promulgated the 
sentence of Private W. W. Lunt, Co. I, Ninth Maine (a deserter ; case 
noted elsewhere). 



Department Statistics : Total troops, 14,031 ; wounded and 
sick, 3,201 ; died, 24 ; caseswounds, etc., 89 ; died of wounds, etc., 1. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 



Field and Start' 
Co A 




. . 4 m 

95 


en, 9 oft] 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
39 
38 


cers. 


B 






9'> 




C . 






. . 83 




D . 






. . rn 




E 






. . S-t 




F 






. . 92 




G . 






. . 09 




H . 










I 






. 8,S 




K . 






. . 74 




Present aggregate . . 
Aggregate last report . . 


. . S27 
. . 853 


" BUG 
" 892 



Three have been discharged, to enlist in regular army (B, F, K). 

Private V. E. Chase of Co. E died 21 July last in New York, 
but notice of same was not received at regiment till this month. 

One man, Principal Musician N. W. Gove, was discharged, at 
Concord, N. H., b}' an order from the War Department. (See Gen- 
eral Order 126 of Sept. 1862, which does not provide for a principal 
musician. Supplement.) i "xL' 

Lieut, Hynes, who was dealing out our rations, — i. e., detailed for 
that purpose, — was appointed (commissioned) Regimental Quarter- 
master, vice Nesmith, discharged. 

Prisoners of war, same as last month. 





A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 1 


otal 


Sergeants . . . 


. 5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 




Corporals . 


. . 8 


s 


s 


S 


s 


s 


ji 


- 


».; 


s 




Discliarged for di 


sability 1 


2 


1 


4 


I 






1 





2 


15 


Died of disease . 


... 





1 





1 


2 







1 





i'> 


Officers detached 


. . . ) 








1 


1 










2 


() 


(i 


Men detached . 


. 5 





1 


2 





9 




3 


2 


1 


24 


Absent in arrest 


. . . 











4 







2 





1 


8 




(236) 



DECKMBER, 18B2. 




HE opeuing day of this winter month was a peculiarly sad 
one, for at 11 a.m. the deserter Lunt was shot. Full par- 
ticulars elsewhere. Mail. The weather Avas sufficiently 
cold to remind us briefl}' that it was winter. On the night 
of the 6th we had ice a quarter of an inch thick. Lieut. 
W :idlia got a 20 days' leave on the 8th on account of ill health. 
The same day three steamers of the Banks' Expedition to New 
Orleans put into our harbor for coal. 
The War Department on the 9th issued an order (General Order 
202), fixing the price of clothing, etc. ; and as the reader may be de- 
sirous to know the prices, we gratify him by extracts from the 
order : — 

Brass Letters and Xos., each, .S .01 Wall tent fly .§17.00 

Uniform coat 7.21 Forai^e cap .56 

Chevrons for non-com- Trowsers 3.75 

missioned stall" . . . 1.25 Shirts 1.4G 

Chevrons for 1st Sergeants, .35 Drawers 95 

" •' Sergeants . . .2-1 Stockings 32 

" Corporal . . .20 Great coat 9.50 

Bootees, sewed 2.05 Knapsack and strap . . . 2.14 

" pegged 1.48 Haversacks, painted ... .56 

Blankets 3.60 Camp kettles 55 

" rubber 2.55 Fife 50 

Canteen and strap 44 Drum, complete 5.50 

Mess pans 23 Common tent 21.50 

Wall tent 35.00 Shelter tent 3.25 

Annual allowance for clothing (volunteers), .$42.00. 

Co. E on the 11th went to Pinckney Island via Seabrook, as an 
escort to a surveying party under charge of Maj. Butts of the Engi- 
neers. The companj' was directed to take its camp and garrison 
equipage and be prepared to stay a week (see l.Dth). Mail. 

On the 11th also, Gen. Terry relieved the Third New Hampshire 
detail from further daily duty at the receiving magazine (see 20 
Dec.) , and the order severely scolds the entire details (regiments) for 
inefficiency. What did Gen. Terry expect? Did he expect soldiers to 
put in 10 hard solid hours a day with shovel, when they were hired to 
shoulder a musket? "Go to!" w^hatever that may mean. The 
movements of Co. E during its brief sojourn on Pinckney Island are 
not deemed of sufficient consequence to record. 

(237) 



238 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. {Dec. '62. 

Mail, 12th. The Steamer Prometheus, with four companies of 
Fifteenth New Hampshire, put into our harbor on the 13th, in dis- 
tress (the distress is applied to the vessel) . They landed, accom- 
panied by their Colonel and Chaplain ; and they all visited us on 
parade. That was on Saturday. Next day they visited us again 
and, with the Forty-second Massachusetts (another regiment of the 
Banks' Expedition), formed on our flanks at parade and during 
services. 

Co. E returned to the regiment on the 15th. The diaries were 
conflicting at this point. One says Co. E returned 15th ; and another, 
under date of 16th says : " Second platoon of Co. E went to Pinck- 
ney." Another diary, 18th, says : "First platoon to Pinckney Island 
today." Under date of 16th a letter says : " Eight deaths in regiment 
to date." 

On the 18th Co. F went to Battery Mitchel and relieved Co. D 
(a week's tour) . 

The length of time since last payment of the troops had substan- 
tially exhausted even the officers' money ; and to relieve them, Gen. 
Brannan ordered on the 19 th that two rations be issued to officers under 
certain restrictions. 

On the 20th (see 11th also) Gen. Terry again placed Third New 
Hampshire on detail of daily duty at the receiving magazine, the Third 
Ehode Island and the Third New Hampshire to furnish all, beginning 
22d inst. with Third Rhode Island. Mail. 

A diary of the 21st says, " Co. E'back to camp ; " and that is un- 
doubtedly correct, as the next day (22d) a Co. E diary says, " A 
battalion drill on beach." Sunday, the 21st, was so rough a day 
(very high winds) that we had no services at parade. The Drum Corps 
had its full complement of 20 on the 2 2d. 

We find the Zouaves drilling ou the 23d. They were of the Banks' 
Expedition, and are the One Hundred and Sixty-second (Duryea's) 
New York. 

On the 24th we reflected that the morrow would be Christmas ; 
but what difference to us? Co. F was relieved from duty at Battery 
Mitchel ou the 25th. We had Christmas services at 9 a.m., and a 
mail in the afternoon. (Co. F arrived about 4 p.m.) 

On the 27th a diary says : " The Star of the South sailed today, 
taking all the sick from the General Hospital and many on leaves of 
absence. Capt. Randlett goes on a sick leave, and Lieut. Nesmith 
(recently discharged : Regimental Quartermaster) goes home, not to 
return." 

An order of the 29th, by Gen. Terry, regarding the approaching 
muster, named the following troops ; and presumably all named were 
at Hilton Head : — 

New York Vohinteer Engineers. Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania. 

Detachment First Mass. Cavalry. Third New Hampshire. 

Light Co. E, Tliird U. S. Artillery. Forty-seventh New York. 

Third Rhode Island Artillery. Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. 

Co. C went to Battery Mitchel. On same daj- we find our Chap- 
lain busily engaged in assisting a Mr. Boston of Newport, N. H., in 



Bee. '62.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 239 

collectiDg historical matter for a book Mr. Boston was about to issue, 
containing the histor}' of all the New Hampshire regiments. Next day, 
the Chaplain very properly remarks that he finds it will require several 
days to complete the matter. 

Co. Kwent to Battery Mitchel on the 31st for (it was said) a ten 
days' tour. The event of the last day of the year was the sinking of 
the famous Ilonitor., on its way to our Department. She left Hampton 
Eoads (Fort Monroe) at 2.30 p.m. on the 29th, in tow of the U. S. 
Steamer Rhode Island; and during a severe blow was sunk with her 
crew, except 2 officers and 12 men, who were saved by almost super- 
human efforts. 

The following data, not especially of Third New Hampshire, but 
of interest nevertheless, is given, as a fitting close of the year : — 

DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

During the year 1862, 215 officers resigned, besides 10 while under 
charges, 3 for incompetency, and 5 dismissed by general court-martial. 
1,726 enlisted men w-ere discharged, and about 750 died. 

These figures do not include Key AVest for the month of 
December. 

The year 1863, which we are about to enter, proved to be an 
eventful one, far exceeding in importance the year just passed. 



SUPPIvElVIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 202 of the 9th gave prices of clothing (see Clothing 
or similar title). 

On the 2 2d (this is inserted for its great historic value, though not 
directly connected with the Third New Hampshire) the President issued 
a circular letter to the Army of the Potomac, concerning the battle of 
Fredericksburg, saying that although unsuccessful, the attempt was 
not an error, nor the failure other than an accident. He congratulated 
them on their small loss, and tendered the thanks of the nation. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

In General Order 57 of the llih. Gen. Brannan announced that 
he learned with regret that medical officers had been misappropriating 
hospital supplies, and funds too, to their personal use, and forbade 
it in future in no uncertain language. 

General Order 58 of the 19 th said that, owing to the length of time 
since some of the troops had been paid, rations might be issued to 
officers who lacked the necessary funds to purchase their own, and 
the paymaster to deduct for same at next payment. 



240 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



ID. 



Department Statistics: Total troops, 15,724 ; wounded and sick, 
2,412 ; died, 16 ; cases of wounds, 102 ; died of wounds, etc., 0. 



The Montlily Return 
Field and staff . 


shows : — 


4 111 


Co. A . 






. 94 ' 


V> . 






. 88 ' 


c 






82 ' 


D . 








E . 






. 82 ' 


F . 






. 90 ' 


G . 






. 65 ' 


H . 






. 70 ' 


I . 






. 86 ' 


K . 






. 72 ' 



Present aggregate . . . 805 36 

Aggregate last report . . 

Two men of Company G (Fuller and Sessions), d 



841 

66 



opped as dis- 
charged, have been taken up on rolls, the previous record of discharge 
having been proved to be an error. 

Wiggin of G died of wound. 

Surgeon Moulton, (^)uarterniaster Nesmith and Lieut. Cody, have 
all been discharged during the month, by Special Order 36'J of the 
War Department. 



Sergeants .... 

Corporals 8 

Present sick 

Officers in arrest . . . 
Men absent in arrest . . 
Officers absent with leave 

Absent sick 

Discharged for disability 
Died of disease .... 



A 


B 


C 


D 


E 


F 


G 


H 


I 


K 


Total 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 




8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


^ 


8 


8 


49 


1) 


1 


























1 














1 





1 


2 





1 


5 








u 








1 


1 











2 

18 


1 


3 


1 


4 


1 


1 


4 





2 


2 


19 





1 








1 


1 


1 











4 










CALENDAR, 


1862. 












1 


•a 

S 

1 


1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


1 

1 

CO 




1 
1 


1 


1 

H 


1 ^ 
1 

> 


1 . 

II 
1 


1 


1 

s i 

1 


JAN.... 








1 

8 


2 
9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


JULY... 






1 

8 


2 

9 


3 

10 


4 
11 


5 
12 




5 


6 


7 




6 


7 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




9(5 


97 


28 


29 


30 


31 






97 


98 


99 


30 


31 






FEB... 












1 
8 


AUG... 












1 

8 


9 

9 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




10 


U 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


.... 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


2!) 


30 


MARCH 














1 

8 


SEPT.. 


31 














2 


3 


4 


5 


G 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




23 


24 


25 


26 


.27 


28 


29 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




30 


31 














28 


9<) 


30 










APRIL . 






1 


2 


3 
10 


4 
11 




OCT .. 








1 


2 


3 


4. 




6 


7 


8 


9 


12 




5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




97 


?8 


^9 


30 










9,(1 


97 


9,R 


29 


30 


31 




MAY... 










1 
8 


2 

9 


10 


NOV. . . 














1 

8 




4 


5 


6 


7 




2 


3' 


4 


5 


6 


7 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 • 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


JUNE.. 
















DEC... 


30 














1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




T 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




"1 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




21 i 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




29 


30 














28 


29 


30 


31 































Calendar, 


1863. 








1 
3. 


•0 

1 




1 

1 


1 
H 


1 


1 




1 

c 


1 

c 


I 


1 
1 


1 


■a 


1 


JAN.... 










1 

8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


JULY.. 






1 


1 

8 


1 ^ 

9 


3 
10 


4 
11 




4 


5 


6 


7 




5 


6 


7 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 




FEB.... 
















AUG... 














1 
8 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 




9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




"16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


2'.) 


MARCH 
















SEPT. . 


30 


31 












1 

8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


4 

11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


7 
14 


1 

8 


2 

9 


3 
10 


4 
11 


5 

12 




6 


7 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




90 


80 


81 












27 


28 


99 


30 








APRIL . 








1 
8 


2 


3 
10 


4 
11 


OCT. . . 






.... 

1 
8 


2 
9 


3 

10 




5 


6 


7 




4 


5 


6 


7 




12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 




11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 




19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 




18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 




"^fi 


97 


28 


29 


30 










26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 


MAY... 












1 

8 


2 
9 


NOV... 






3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 




10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 




8 


9 


10 


111 


12 


13 


14 




17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 




15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 




24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 




22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


28 




81 
















29 


30 












JUNE.. 


7 


1 
8 


2 

9 


3 

10 


4 
11 


5 
12 


6 
13 


DEC. .. 




1 
8 


2 
9 


3 

10 


4 
11 


5 
12 




6 


7 




U 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 




13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 




21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 




20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 




28 


29 


30 












27 


28 


29 


30 


31 















JANUARY, 1863. 




jE started in on the new year with a welcome mail on the 
Steamer BlarJcstone. Another event of that day was 
the calling together of the otiicers of Company G, by 
Capt. Emmons, under a paragraph of the Regulations. 
The records of that meeting show the otiicers to be : 
Capt. Emmons, 1st Lieut. Handerson, and 2d Lieut, 
^adlia. Present, Capt. Emmons, who called the meeting to 
ler, introduced and passed certain resolutions in regard to 
the company fund (the vote appears to have been a unanimous one), 
and adjourned. This is not inserted for frivolous reasons alone : 
there is a moral to be extracted from this strict compliance with 
Army Regulations. 

The famous " Lumber Expedition" was ordered on the 2d. Col. 
Jackson was ordered to supply two full companies, but instead made 
up its equivalent as follows : 50 men from Co. D ; 26 from Co. F 
and 24 from Co. A, as one company, under Capt. Maxwell, who 
commanded the two companies. The other hundred was made up 
of 61 of Co. I and 39 of Co. E, under Capt. Burnham. The other 
officers accompanying were 1st Lieuts. Smith and Jackson, 2d Lieut. 
Flanders, Adjt. Libby and Acting 2d Lieut. Ackerman (of D). The 
men were directed to the Steamer Delaware and to report to Capt. 
Chas. E. Fuller, Acting (.Quartermaster, though the expedition proper 
was under a Capt. Coryelle. Besides our regiment, there were about 
30(» of the Third Rhode Island. The expedition sailed about 4 p.m. 
of the 3d (Saturday), and the experiences and results are worth 
relating, under the head of 

THE LUMBER EXPEDITION TO FLORIDA. 

The object of the expedition was to secure a certain large lot of 
lumber on the Nassau River, prepared by and in the hands of the 
rebels. The reports were to the effect that the lumber was practi- 
cally unguarded and that a " surprise party" could take it : hence the 
attempt. The men were supplied with 10 days' rations. The expe- 
dition arrived at Fernandina at 11 a.m. the 5th, and the men landed 
for exercise for two hours. At 3 p.m. the Cosmopolitan arrived with 
Dr. Buzzell (our Regimental Surgeon) on board, and he joined the 
regiment. His being sent to us appears to have been an afterthought. 

> (241) 

18 



242 THIRD NEW HAMPSHmE REGIMENT. [-/«?;. '63. 

The Cosmopolitayi also bad on board the officer in command of the 
expedition, Capt. Coryelle. The "fleet" lay in the stream all night. 
On the 6th they left Feruandina at daylight, and arrived off the 
mouth of the Nassau River at 10 a.m. The Cosmopolitan then went 
down the coast after a gunboat, returning at 7.30 a.m. on the 7th, 
with the gunboat Uncas. At 9 a.m. all three vessels went in over 
the bar. The Uncas ran aground at a bend. The other two passed 
the Uncas and then anchored the 8th. The Uncas floated at 10 a.m. ; 
and at 11 all three boats went up the river. At 1 p.m. the U7icas 
went ahead to a mill, and returned at 3, reporting that the lumber we 
were after had been burned. The smoke from it had been seen by 
us during the forenoon. All then started down the river, the Dela- 
ware in the rear, with a schooner lashed alongside. The Uncas was 
ahead and ran aground again near the same spot as before. The 
other two passed by her. About 5 p.m. an ambushed party of rebels 
fired at our men, who were on the deck of the Delaware. Most of the 
men were for the moment unarmed ; but as soon as they could seize 
their muskets, they returned the fire. Two rebels were seen to fall. 
The following men were wouuded : — 

Private R. M. C. Hilliard of Co. E, in left lung (dangerously). 
John Mears " Co. A, " left leg (severehO- 

" Rody Robinson " Co. E, " left leg (slightly). 

The Cosmopolitan was said also to have been fired into. Dr. 
Buzzell removed the ball from Mears' leg during the eveniug. All 
anchored in the river. At 9 a.m. on the 9th all started down and out 
of the river to the coast, the Cosmopolitan going down the coast, and 
the Delaivare going to Hilton Head, with two empty schooners in 
tow. Arrived at Hilton Head the 10th at 2 p.m. ; and after sending 
the three wounded to the General Hospital, the details rejoined their 
respective regiments. The results of the expedition do not appear 
to require any summing up. 



Gen. Terry on the 5th established the hours 8 to 11 and 1 to 5 
as the working hours for fatigue paities. The same day a diary 
says "Work beguu on new meeting-house." 

On the 10th Gen. Terry ordered the details of 22d December 
(see) discontinued, and in place thereof to be a daily detail of an 
officer and 30 men each from the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Third 
New Hampshire, vSeventh Connecticut and Forty-seventh New York, 
for duty in the Engineers Department alternately, begiuuing the 12th. 
He also directed same day that religious services be held at the uni- 
form hour of 11 A.M. on Sundays. On the 12th there was good news 
for the men of volunteer regiments who had received commissions in 
the colored regiments. Heretofore they had been a sort of half man, 
half officer; but Gen. Brannan then directed (by orders from the 
War Department) that all such men be mustered out as enlisted men 
when mustered in as officers. About 200 recruits for the colored 
regiments arrived about the 13th from Feruandina, where tliey had 
been recruited by Lieut. -Col. Billings. Co. B Aveut to Battery Mitchel 
on the 14th, and it appears that the company went by Steamer 
3Iayftower. 



Jan. '^5.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 243 

All wagons and teamsters (excepting certain named in the or- 
der) were ordered to report on tlie IGth to the Post Quartermaster, 
Lieut. David Jones. The particular service they were to or did per- 
form does not appear. 

The night of the 16th produced ice half an inch thick. Think 
of that, ye people who dwelt in houses and lay on feather beds ! 
though some have the faculty of being able to lie anywhere. 

Gen. Hunter and Staff arrived on the 18th on the Arago., to as- 
sume command of the Department again, relieving Gen. Brannan, 
who was originally temporarily appointed by Gen Mitchel to assume 
command while he (Gen. Mitchel) was temporarily sick. The poor 
man was mistaken, though his sickness was in reality of very brief 
duration. The same steamer brought us a good mail. 'Twas Sun- 
day ; and we had a Sabbath School at 1 , a prayer meeting at 6 ; 
and a diary says, "We had meetings afternoon and evening in our 
new church." The Arago was also the bearer of a lot of commis- 
sions for our regiment. A regimental order of the 19th tells the 
story, as follows : — 

1st Lieut. Hynes, R. Q. M., dating in Nov. 

2d " Flanders, IstLient., " If! " (ass'dtoE). 

Libby, Jr., " " " 1(5 Jan. ( " "A). 

Stearns, " " " 1 " ( " " F). 

Sergt. Wadsworth (F), 2d Lieut., " 1(^ Nov. ( " " F). 

Q.M. Sergt. Brainard, •' " " 17 " ( " '• E). 

Sergt. -Maj.Copp, '' " " 1 Jan. ( " " B). 
Private Wm. Ladd Dodge (B), Sergt. -Maj. ?;/ce Copp ("to rank 1 Jan.) 

Varnuin H. Hill (K), Q. M. Sergt. " Brainard" " 

The same day, the Ironsides, Passaic and others (ironclads) 
came into the harbor. It began to look like business. Their ar- 
rival, so soon after Gen. Hunter, appeared to be in connection with 
his arrival and future intentions. 

Gen. Hunter formally assumed command of the Department on 
the 20th, and announced his Staff. The same day Col. Jackson re- 
ported by letter to the Governor of New Hampshire that the "offi- 
cers were full." Presumably he meant the offices. The other alter- 
native might have led to a suit for libel. 

It really looked as if something was to be done in the Depart- 
ment, for on the ^Oth several of our extra duty men were ordered to 
return to the regiment. Our regimental detail for Battery Mitchel 
was again fixed, on the 21st, at 1 officer and 27 men, with privilege 
of making up the detail with men already there. The same day we 
were very busy in getting ready for a special muster. Gen. Hunter 
evidently meant to ascertain what troops he had got, and look them 
over a little prior to ordering them to Charleston or Savannah. 

On the 2 2d we had a general inspection by Capt. Jackson of the 
Regular Army. Several gunboats and other vessels, warlike and 
otherwise, arrived daily, at that period ; and the excitement was on 
the increase. Gen. Hunter had a grand review of all the troops on 
the 23d, nearly opposite our camp. Mail. Co. B arrived from Bat- 
tery Mitchel 23d. 



244 THIRD NEW HAMrSHIUE REGIMENT. {Jan. '63. 

Gen. Hunter's General Order 5, of the 22d, was aimed, in its 
first part, at sutlers, directing that Post Councils of Administration 
be at once appointed, to fix prices, etc. The latter part of the order 
was aimed at the sutler's foe, the general trader, who carried his 
wares in his pocket or his tent ; for he said that all officers were 
strictly prohibited from engaging in au}' species of trade, huckstering 
or sutling with the men of their command. All such to be arrested ! 

Several gunboats left the harbor on the 24th ; and during the 
day we heard heavy firing in the direction of Pulaski, though there 
may have been no connection between the two events. Gen. Hunter 
visited our Sunday School on the 25th. 

We had a slight " flurry" of snow on the 28th, in the morning; 
but it only lasted an hour or two. Some of the boys were expedi- 
tious and ambitious enough to make a few snowballs, and covered 
themselves with glory by snowballing in South Carolina ! 

On that day Gen. Terry directed that company and battalion 
drill cease, and that the forenoon be devoted to the school of the 
soldier and the afternoon to bayonet exercise ; and a school to be es- 
tablished in every regiment for the instruction of officers and non- 
commissioned officers. Bayonet exercise, indeed ! It would appear 
that Hunter really meant that we should get near enough to the 
rebels to use our bayonets. Long-range fighting is the most con- 
ducive to safety and comfort ; but he evidently meant to eliminate 
those two elements from the Department. But just think for a mo- 
ment that the other fellow was drilling in bayonet exercise, too, and 
perhaps has a gun an inch or two longer than yours ! Ugh ! Its too 
unpleasant a thought. Who does n't remember that bayonet exer- 
cise? Why, we had more fun to the square yard than before in all 
our service. Leap frog was as nothing to it. One of the move- 
ments was to take your gun by the breach, as near the butt as possi- 
ble, then waltz around, and at about the third or fourth turn sud- 
denly thrust your gun full length horizontally at an imaginary foe, 
sticking him amidships or right where his vitals are located. This 
little movement is very pretty and unique when a hundred men are 
essaying to do it in unison. They sometimes did not turn the same 
number of times, and the thrust would very nearly deprive a com- 
rade of his life or his reason. There were a hundred other quite 
pretty moves, only one more of which need be given. This was 
called "guarding against cavalry." We were obliged to get into a 
penitent attitude (on our knees) , and then to place the butt of our 
musket on the ground and against our knees, holding the musket 
firmly with both hands, at an angle of 45 degrees, and calmly wait 
for the enemy's cavalry to impale itself on the points of our bayonets ; 
and in case they strictly complied with our wishes, we were to hold 
them there in mid-air while we called for the Corporal of the Guard 
to come and formally invite them to surrender. Some cruel soldier 
has suggested that while the impaled horseman is impatiently await- 
ing the arrival of the Corporal of the Guard, the victor shout at him 
derisively, at intervals of say five minutes, these magic words : 
" Kum Orf !" Bayonet exercise is a very, very pretty drill. Mail. 
Cold and stormy. 




Jan. '^.?.] TIHUn NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 245 

Tlie Princess Jtoi/al, a blockade runner, was captured off Charles- 
ton the •28th, laden with two large steam engines, propellers, 8 
Armstrong 100-pounders, GOO barrels of gunpowder, together with 
iron, steel and other stores. (She was utilized on 3 Feb., taking our 
mail, etc., north.) The Isaac Smith, which barely escaped the se- 
vere storm of November, 1861, was cap- 
tured by the rebels on the 30th, in the 
Stono River. She was afterwards repaired 
and named the Stono, and was used about 
Sumter later on. The New Ironsides sent 
all its rigging and spars to Hilton Head 
for storage ; and sevei-al troops-laden 
transports arrived. 

The last da^' of the month was full of 
interest. The rebel rams Palmetto State ^ a/\ockin6 b^d. 
and Chicora, came out from Charleston and 
attacked our blockading fleet. They first 

captured the Mercedita, and paroled the officers and men. They next 
attacked the Kei/stone State, which after a little hauled down its col- 
ors, but soon hoisted them again. The rams then retreated, exchang- 
ing shots with the Housatonic. This sortie was not so prolific in 
actual results as was expected ; but the fact that the fleet of block- 
aders hoisted anchor the better to fight, and some put off a little 
way, knowing they could not successfully compete with an iron ram 
at short range, led to the issuance by Beauregard of a proclamation, 
for diplomatic effect, stating that the fleet had been driven out of 
sight, and therefore the blockade had been raised. The local papers 
stated that the foreign consuls had investigated the affair and were 
satisfied that the blockade had been raised. All this created a rum- 
pus, not only in the fleet but at Washington as well ; and all over the 
North, all the people who were inimical to the government were at 
once lively enough in their remarks. The fleet officers got up affida- 
vits setting forth the facts, denying in no weak language the asser- 
tions of the enemy. Sixteen steamers came in the 31st with troops. 
They were from North Carolina, and were under Gen. Foster, and 
came as reinforcements. Mail. 

We were having about that time what might have been called a 
"concert season" at Hilton Head. A "troupe" of minstrels, of the 
" burnt cork" and other varieties, composed of men of talent from 
the various regiments, were holding forth in one of the government 
buildings at the Head and were creating quite a furore. It was an 
oasis in our great desert and much appreciated. The attendance 
was good and the enthusiasm unbounded, and in consequence the 
" encores" eventually extended the performances to an unwarranted 
hour, so Gen. Terry had come to think. He ordered (31st) that all 
concerts, etc., be closed at fifteen minutes before tattoo. In the 
same order he directed sutlers and traders to close at retreat. 

The liquor question — that ever recurring and vexed conun- 
drum — came up again for legislation ; for in the same order referred 
to above. Gen. Terry directed that no spirituous liquor be sold by any 



24G THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [./an. '63. 

trader, and no malt liquor or wine be sold by the bottle or glass. The 
latter to be sold by the case or basket, and only on order approved 
by the commanding officer of the Department or of the Post. The 
Provost Marshal was directed to enforce the same. 

Our Chaplain, who was in quite poor health, left the 31st for 
Florida on a short leave. 

We had fun all the month at the expense of one of the recruits, 
who brought a new pair of skates with him. For obvious reasons 
his name is withheld from the public. 

A New York Herald letter, dated 26 and published 30 Jan. 1863, 
notes the case of Lieut. Huggins, Forty-seventh New York, who was 
recognized by Lieut. Maxwell, Third New Hampshire, as a deserter 
from the Regular Army. Further particulars may be found in Capt. 
Maxwell's personal. 

The month saw the completion of the organization of the First 
South Carolina (colored) Volunteers, composed of 10 companies of 
about 86 men each, officered entirely by whites. All the men were 
volunteers. The organization of the Second had begun, and that was 
to be commanded by Col. Montgomery. Every man of the First 
South Carolina was supposed to say "Fuss Souf," if asked "what 
regiment?" 



SUPPLKNIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 
General Order 2 of the 3d created the Department of the East, 
embracing the New England States and New York, with headquarters 
at New York city. Gen. Wool assigned to its command. 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 2 of the 12th promulgated instructions from Sec- 
retary of War, that when enlisted meu of white regiments were 
appointed officers in colored regiments, they be mustered out as en- 
listed men when mustered in as officers. 

General Order 3 of thfe 20th was the order of Gen. Hunter 
resuming command of the Department and announcing his Staff. 
As an example of the possible size of such a staff, the list is here 
given : — 

Brig. -Gen. Truman Seymour . Chief of Stiitrand Chief of Artillery. 

Lieut. -Col. Charles G. Halpine Asisstant Adjutant-General. 

Maj. Edward W. Smith . . . Assistant Adjutant-General. 

Lieut. Israel R. Sealy .... Acting Assistant Adjutant- General 

(Forty-seventli New York). 

Lieut. -Col. James H. Wilson . Assistant Inspector-General. 

Lieut. -Col. M. R. Morgan . . Chief Commissary of Subsistence. 

Surgeon Charles H. Crane . ^ Medical Director. 

Maj. E. E. Paulding .... Chief Paymaster. 



Jan. '63.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMEXT. 



247 



Capt. James C. Duaae 
Capt. John W. Todd . . 
Col. James D. Fessendeu 
Maj. Edward Wright . . 
Capt. R. W. Thompson . 

Capt. William R. Dole 
Capt. Yolney Hickox . . 
Capt. Samuel W. Stockton 
Capt. Arthur McKenzie . 
Lieut. Charles E. Hay 
Lieut. Richard Skinner . 

(To the above it is poss 



Chief of Engineers. 

Chief of Ordnance. 

Aide-de-Canip. 

Aide-de-Camp. 

Acting Commissary of Subsistence 

and Acting Aide-de-Camp. 
Aide-de-Camp. 



Acting 
Actini 



Aide-de-Camp. 
Aide-de-Camp. 



ble to add a chief mustering odicer, a 
quarantine officer, a chief quartermaster, a consulting engineer, a 
provost marshal general, a topographical engineer, a chief signal 
officer, etc., etc.) 

The order called attention to the importance of the bayonet, and 
forbade any officer or man to leave the (a) battle-field to carry off 
the wounded. 

General Order 4 of the 20th developed the fact that Lieut. -Col. 
Greene had arrived on a special mission, from the Headquarters of 
the Army, to inspect and report on the condition of the Department. 

General Order 5 of the 22d was about sutlers. (See Sutlers.) 



The Department Statistics for January, 1863, are: Total troops, 
14,646 ; wounded and sick, 2,187 ; died, 2 ; cases wounded, etc., 126 ; 
died of wounds, etc., 0. 



The JMouthly Return shows : — 

Field and Stall' 4 men, 8 officers. 

Co. A 94 " 3 " 

B iiii '' 3 " 

C 81 " 3 " 

D 71 " 3 " 

E 80 " 3 '• 

F 89 " 3 " 

G 61 " 3 " 

H G9 " 3 " 

I 88 " 3 " 

K _70 " 3 " 

Present aggregate 795 38 833 

Aggregate last report .... 805 36 8-11 

One man (Sessions of G) has enlisted in the regular army, under 
provisions of War Department Orders. 

Three enlisted men have received commissions, namely : — 

Sergt.-Maj. E. J. Copp as 2d Lieutenant, B. 

Quartermaster-Sergt. C. F. Brainard, " " " C. 

Sergt. David Wadsworth (F) . . " " " F. 

Private Wm Ladd Dodge of D has been promoted to Sergeant- 
Major, and Private Varuum H. Hill of K to Quartermaster-Sergeant. 
But one man, Private Buckmiuster of B, has died of disease. 



248 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



IJan. '63. 



Two men of G, Trotter and Miles, are (wrongfully) reported as 
deserters. Both of these men were wounded IG June last and sent 
to hospital at New York, and had been ordered from the hospital to 
regiment in October and November respectively, probably having 
recovered. (See next month.) 

Lieut. Hynes of Co. A, who has been Acting Regimental Quarter- 
master, has received his appointment. Lieut. Marsh has resigned. 

Present sick, 50, all the companies being represented : the small- 
est, 2 (G) ; the largest, 9 (A and B) . One officer in arrest (Capt. 
Wilbur of B) . 

ABCDEFGHIK Totals. 



Sergeants . . . 
Corporals . . . 
Absent sick . . 
Absent in arrest 
Prisoners of war 
Detached . . . 
Oflicers detached 
Present sick . . 
Recruits received 
Discharged for disability 



5 5 

8 8 



8 8 



5 4 

8 8 



2 ;3G 
0001000001 



1 2 
10 2 110 1 




rflK/iC£ap 



^^^^ CAP l^^o 



"Sf© 




FEBRUARY, 1863. 



^ HP] important event which opened February was the ad- 
^> vent in camp of five white women. They were the wives 
of the following officers : Maj. Plimpton, Capt. Rand- 
lett, Capt. Clark, Lieut. Flanders and Adjt. Libby. 
They arrived at the Head on the previous night, on the 
express steamer Mary Sanford. The gunboat Kpysfone State 
put into Hilton Head for repairs the same di\y^ having been 
^ attacked yesterday off Charleston, and had her boiler burst, 
killing 20 and wounding 22 men. More troops arrived from North 
Carolina. 

We were pleased to hear on the ith that the Arago had arrived, 
bringing money to pay the troops. Capt. Randlett arrived from 
leave, getting to camp on the 5th. Foster's troops still lying in the 
harbor, their transports being near St. Helena. It was reported that 
Foster himself had arrived, but was unwilling to report to and be 
under Hunter. More will be said later on upon this subject. 

Capt. Wilbur's sentence w^as published on the 6th, by General 
Order 7, Department of the South, but not read on parade till the 
9th (see his Personal) . There was a clashing of forces aside from 
Hunter and Foster. It was between Hunter and the government 
officers who represented the Treasury Department and had advertised 
certain confiscated land to be sold. 

Hunter on the 7th ordered all such advertising and sales to be 
suspended until the pleasure of the President could be made known. 
A Xew York Herald letter of 9 Feb. 1863, published the 13th, 
said: " Hilton Head today has a very different aspect from what 
it had when it was captured in November, 1S61. At that time all 
that stood on Hilton Head was an old dwelling house, occupied by the 
rebels as headquarters, a large two-story shanty hospital, an old cot- 
ton packing house, now used as the post office, and a few negro huts. 
[This only referred to the northerly end of the island, exclusive of the 
plantations. — D. E.] Fifteen months of occupancy by our troops has 
brought a change over the scene. The old dwelling house has been 
rejuvenated, modernized, painted, etc., and is occupied by chiefs of 
departments. Large storehouses — each three or four hundred feet 

(249) 



250 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[_F,'h. '63, 



long, ordnance buildings, provost guard barracks, a large and mag- 
nificent house for the commanding general, and one of the best and 
largest army hospitals in the country. These houses are built along 
the margin and facing the river, on both sides of 
I Fort Welles. In addition to these are a long line 

of frame stores, occupied for various purposes. 
This row of stores enjoys the soubriquet of " Rob- 
bers' Row," in compliment to the occupants. 
.... The point is environed by a semi-circle 
of formidable fortifications .... the govern- 
ment has built a wharf about a fourth of a mile 
in length. It is accessible for the largest vessels 
at any stage of water." 

Under authority of the War Department, 
Gen. Hunter on the 10th convened an Examining 
Board, to inquire into the capacity, qualifications, 
propriety of conduct and efficiency of such officers 
as might be brought before it. The Board con- 
sisted of Brig. -Gens. Terry and Stevenson, Col. 
Strawbridge (Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania), Col. 
Metcalf (third Rhode Island) and Maj. Josiah I. 
Plimpton (Third New Hampshire), and were or- 
dered to convene the 13th. Here was another 
pretty " how d'ye do I" John Smith, who holds a 

captain's commission in the Australia Zoos, 

who has mortally offended his brother officers by 
insisting on getting grossly intoxicated and swear- 
ing in a very profane manner on frequent occa- 
sions, can now be ordered before this Board ; and 
, I the Board may opine in writing that the aforesaid 
John Smith has not the proper efficiency requisite 
for the position he holds — ergo, he'd do well to 
at once signify his great desire to immediately 
surrender his right to stay. Or a Chaplain, 
who may have been a very excellent and exem- 
plary man and a credit to his regiment and the 
service, might on some frivolous pretext be 
ordered before the Board. But it is safe to say 
that the Board itself might have been deceived as to facts, 
and unwittingly do a great wrong to an officer. 

The affidavits referred to in latter part of January last were 
dated 10 Feb., and signed by Capt. W. R. Taylor of the Housa- 
tonic, Comdr. J. H. Strong of the Flag, Comdr. J. M. Frailey of the 
Quaker City, Comdr. P. G. Watmough of the Memphis, and Comdr. 
C. J. Van Alstine of the Stettin. 

Co. C was relieved at Battery Mitchel on the 10th by Co. I. 
Same day, a detail of Co. F were "up" for misdemeanor, before 
Gen. Terry. It appears that four of them, being on duty on the 
8th, had in a wicked and cruel manner thrown some dirt or sand on 



Feb. '63.~\ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 251 

some negroes. These four persisted in not " giving each other 
away," so they were all put in Provost Guard for trial. We were 
paid off during the 10th and 11th. 

The New York Herald correspondent wrote on the 11th about 
Lieut. Huggins (see last month) thus : " Lieut. Huggins, alias Sergt. 
Wade, is to serve out the (his) old term in Hamilton's Battery, here 
at Hilton Head." 

The troops having laid long enough in the harbor to suit Gen. 
Hunter, he on the 11th ordered them to make reports and returns. 
The first part of his order assumed command of the troops. Col. 
Jackson was ordered on the 13th to proceed with six companies to 
Pinckne}' Island, to cover the operations near Fort Mitchel. Next 
day. Col. Jackson sent to Gen. Terry for needed articles for use on 
Pinckney and suggested that he desired to march four of the six 
companies to Seabrook on Monday afternoon and stay there over 
night ; then to cross to Pinckney with four companies Tuesday morn- 
ing. The other two companies to leave Hilton Head Tuesday by 
steamer or tug, landing on Pinckney near where Co. H was captured. 
Simultaneously with the landing of these two companies, to send one 
company from Seabrook to scour the island. He also suggested a 
small gunboat be sent up the creek in rear of Pinckney, to prevent 
escape of rebels, if any. To these suggestions Gen. Terry replied 
that Gen. Seymour intended Third New Hampshire to start Sunday 
(15th) and land on Pinckney at noon; but he would attempt to pro- 
cure delay of a day to accommodate Col. Jackson. The six com- 
panies left camp for Pinckney on Sunday afternoon. Evidently four 
companies marched to Seabrook and the other two went by Steamer 
Maijflower. Next morning (Monday) the programme as laid out hy 
Col. Jackson was carried out very nearly, though no gunboat is 
found recorded as taking part. 

The six companies at Pinckney were : A, B, C, D, F and K. 
Co. I went to Pope's, on Hilton Head, opposite the six companies. 
Cos. G and H remained in camp at Hilton Head, under Capt. Em- 
mons. Co. E was at Provost, Hilton Head, detached. Co. I acted 
as guard over the commissary and quartermaster stores. 

As it may not be amiss to give a sample morning report from an 
outpost, we venture to select one of the 1 7th : — 

Headquarters Thihd New Hampshire Vols., 
PixcKXEY Island, S. C, 17 Feb. 1863. 

Sir : I have the honor to report that everything remained quiet during 
the night. Several camp-tires were seen on the mainland, and one picliet 
reports having seen on tliis island, about daylight, three men with a large 
dog, supposed to be rebels. We greatly need a saddle horse, as the circuit 
of the posts if travelled on foot not only occupies much time, but is extremely 
fatiguing ; and we find it necessary to visit the ditterent posts during the 
night. Respectfully, etc., 

John H. Jackson, 
To ADRLA.N Terry, Colonel Commanding. 

Captain and A. A. A.-G., Hilton Head. 



The Ericsson arrived 17th with machines, said to be specially 
adapted for destroying torpedoes, etc., in creeks. It would appear 



252 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IFeh. '63. 

that Col. Jackson got the horse desired ; for the 19th was mostly spent 
by the Chaplain in selecting a horse, as he says, for Col. Jackson. 
We were having good times at Pinckney. We expected to stay there 
for some time, and we fitted np onr tents with the lumber which we 
obtained from different parts of the island. 

About the 2 1 st we were treated to a rumor that a rebel ram was 
about to be sent down to us from vSavannah. In consequence more 
haste was made in preparing Battery Mitchel. Old hulks were sunk 
in the creek. The masts in one of them were so tempting that Col. 
Jackson obtained permission to take them. One of them served as 
a flag- staff for our camp. 

The Chaplain brought a mail to Pinckney on the 22d. He was 
stopping at the camp at Hilton Head, where Cos. Gr and H were 
(Capts. Emmons and Ayer). We heard (22d) that "Gen. Hunter 
and Gen. Foster don't mix worth a cent," and that the latter had gone 
to Washington to get the kinks taken out. One fact is worth relating 
here. On Gen. Foster's arrival (/.e., the troops). Gen. Hunter sought 
to amalgamate them with his Department, thereby destroying their 
identity as a Corps ; and at this particular phase of the matter they 
"kicked," and they were evidently in the right. They had achieved 
a reputation as the Eighteenth Army Corps, and they didn't propose 
to let the designation and the badges and the distinction float away 
with the tide. Gen. Foster went North on his fastest steamer, the 
R. B. Forbes; and the result was that Gen. Hunter countermanded his 
order and recognized the fact that it was a part of the Eighteenth Army 
Corps, temporarily in the (his) Department. Meanwhile the troops 
had nearly run out of provisions and there was danger of much suf- 
fering. The snarl was straightened out none too soon for their comfort. 

A confidential letter was received by Col. Jackson on the 24th to 
the effect that his regiment was to be employed on the operations about 
to commence. 

Maj. Plimpton (and his w^ife) went North on the 25th. His 
health had been poor, and he had been granted a leave. 

Gen. Hunter issued a circular on the 25th in reference to em- 
barking. Each man to have 5 days' rations and GO rounds. Each 
transport to have 10 days' rations and 140 rounds for the troops on 
board. He concluded his circular by admonishing the troops not to 
give undue publicity to the details. 

Cos. G and H got orders on the 2Gth to pack up, though the 
order didn't reach Pinckney and the other companies till next day. 
The 27th and 2Sth were busy days. " Pack up ! Pack up !" One of 
the great questions to solve at such times was. What shall I destroy 
or abandon ? In the excitement of getting ready and the thought that 
we were to do something, we were comfortably happy. We were 
somewhat stirred by hearing that, during the few previous days, the 
heavier guns at Hilton Head had been placed on board vessels ready 
to be sent to whatever point Gen. Hunter might desire. It really 
looked like business again. Several monitors were in the harbor, and 
certain regiments had been drilling in embarking. Truly, these all 
portended a coming storm. 



Feb. '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



>53 



A letter written during the latter part of the month said a cap- 
tain's pay was as follows : — 

Pay proper $00.00 

For responsibility of arras, etc. . . . 10.00 

" four rations 36.00 

" pay and allowance for servant . . 22.50 

Total 128.50 

Less war tax 2.35 

Net monthly $126.15 

The month ended, leaving the Third New Hampshire and other 
troops packed up, waiting for the order to embark — a not very 
pleasant condition to remain in a great while. 



SUPPIvKMKNT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 33 of the 6th added New Jersey to the Depart- 
ment of the East. 

General Order .35 of the 7th was about sutlers. (See Sutlers.) 
General Order 38 of tiie 10th revoked General Order 162 of 1862, 
authorizing enlistments from volunteers into the I'egular army. (See 
Session's case in last month's Supplement.) 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 7 of the 6th promulgated the sentence of our 
Capt. Wilbur of B. (See his Personal, or General Court-martial 
Cases, or both.) 

General Order 9 of tlie 7th directed a suspension of all advertised 
sales of lands for unpaid direct taxes. (This was really a quarrel 
between General Hunter and the Tax Commissioner, and into the 
merits or particulars of which it is not our province to enter. ) 

General Order 10 of the lith ordered a thorough registration of 
all persons not in the military or naval service in the Department, 
within five days, or be arrested by Provost Marshal. If so registering, 
to be given a pass certifying them to be loyal (if so proven, of course) 
and that they had taken the oath of allegiance. The order also said 
the Commanding General had learned with regret that furniture was 
being sent North without authority and forbade it in future. (He 
reall}' meant to cut off the inestimable privilege of sending home 
pianos, bookcases, whatnots, sideboards and such things as little keep- 
sakes, having captured them from our erring brethren.) 

General Order 12 of the 10th created and convened a Board of 
Officers (Gens. Terry and Stevenson, Cols. Strawbridge and Metcalf, 
and Maj. Plimpton), to hold a sort of inquest on the live bodies of 
such officers as might be brought before them. (Alluded to else- 
where.) 



254 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Feh. '63. 

General Order 13 of the lltli was an assumption of the command 
of all the troops (reinforcements) then recently arrived from North 
Carolina, and amalgamating them with the Department of the South, 
Tenth Arni}^ Corps. Further details of the order had in view the 
entire obliteration of their identity as the Eighteenth Army Corps, 
and need not be repeated here. These troops demurred, from Gen. 
Foster at the top to the rearmost private at the bottom. They would 
not (they did not) . To a certain extent, as they lay on their trans- 
ports or were in part landed on St. Helena, they were helpless. They 
were hungry, and had no food except what they could draw from the 
Department of the South, and no requisition for rations would be 
approved till made in the proper form, and that form was incidental 
to and indicative of subjugation. The semblance of surrender was 
shown, the hard tack and coffee were issued and the inner man 
appeased ; but the esprit de corps of the Eighteenth had not yet sur- 
rendered. Gen. Foster had, instead of proceeding in true military 
subordination to Gen. Hunter and laying his sword at his feet, saying, 
" Here am I; what would'st thou?" steamed away North as fast as 
his fastest steamer would take him, and at nearest point communicated 
Avith the authorities at Washington, Avith the result that an embassador 
(a War Department officer) was at once sent down to pour oil on the 
troubled waters. 

Result: Feb. 23, by General Order 15, Gen, Hunter took it all 
back, and said : ' ' Such reinforcements will hereafter be regarded and 
I'eturned as a detachment of the Eighteenth Army Corps serving in 
the Department of the South and forming a portion of this command, 
etc." Thus (and this) ended the bloodless fight. 

The same order (No. 15) forbade any further enlistments into 
the regular army from volunteers, and also forbade a continuance of 
the practice of issuing rations to families of those who were in the 
rebel service. 

The Department Statistics for P'ebruary, 1863, are: Total 
troops, 26,34<S; wounded and sick, 3,477; died, 8; cases wounded, 
^tc, 143; deaths, 0. 

The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and stall' 4 men, 9 officers. 

Co. A 1)3 " 3 

]} 88 '• 3 

C 7!l " 3 

D 71 " 3 

E . . . . (on provost iiuard at Hilton Head). 

F 8i) men, 3 officers. 

G (;3 " 3 

H (;8 " 3 " 

I 88 " 3 

K (W " 3 

Present airgregate .... — — 

Aggregatehist report . . . 795 38 833 
(A meraorandnm shows Co. E to have 83 aggregate.) 



Feh. '6S.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



The two men of Co. G reported last mouth as having deserted, 
are now reported as in the Convalescent Camp at Fort Hamilton, New 
York Harbor, and are taken up again on the rolls. 

Another ease of the same nature is that of Private Elisha J. 
Goodwin of Co. G, who had been previously dropped as having en- 
listed in the regular army, is this month taken up on the rolls of Co. 
G, under a Special Order of the Department, dated 22d ult. Whether 
this man was rejected by the regular army after having enlisted in it 
is the leading question, for on no other theory is it apparently possi- 
l)le to account for this case and condition. 

Six men have been discharged for disability, two of them in 
September last, though the notifications have only recently arrived. 
The six are from A, 1 ; C, 2 ; H, 1 ; K, 2. One man (Fuller, recruit 
for (t) has been discharged by order of the Secretary of War. Asst. 
Surg. Chas. A. Burnham has reported for duty. As a i)ersonal mat- 
ter, the writer ventures to say that in stature Dr. Burnham was as 
much shorter than the average man as our Dr. Kimball (who came to 
us later — June, 1868) was taller; and whenever the two doctors 
chanced to be together, the difference was quite observable, and com- 
ment was in oixler, generally of a jocose variety. 

Officers in arrest, 1 (('apt. Wilbiir) ; oflicers absent with leave: 
G, 1 ; Field and Staff', 1 : total, 2. (K not included.) 



Ser,sreants . . . 
Corporals . . . 
Absent in arrest 
Officers detached 
Prisoners of War 



A B C I) E F G H IK Total ;■ 

5 5 5 .5 .") T) 5 4 5 5 

S 8 8 8 8 8 8 G 8 8 

1 1 ;^ 1 1 7 

1 1 () 1 1 4 

2 22 24 








(asii) 



IVIARCH, 1863. 




T,E enter the month like a lion; but the lion is couchant 
and someAvhat impatient. Ready for a spring is he, but 
the order is delayed. The rebel Steamer Nashville was 
captured 1 March, in Savannah River. The fighting 
at Fort McAllister was heard by us, and more or less 
excitement was occasioned by it ; for we did n't know 
it a defeat of our force might not mean that a rebel ram 
■ould come right down our little creek and annihilate us. 
The McAllister tight continued the 2d and 3d. 

The Arago left New York on the -Ith, having on board Sergt.- 
Maj. Dodge, Lieut. Dow, Band Master Ingalls (with the new Second 
Brigade Band) , and several lady nurses for the hospitals in the Depart- 
ment of the South. The latter were to report to Mrs. General Lan- 
der. Capt. Buttcrtleld of K was discharged the 6th for disability 
(see his Personal), and Lieut. S. M. Smith was placed in command. 
So many days having elapsed since we had been ordered to pack 
up, that we had begun to unpack and were practically over the '' pack 
up " order and settling down to the regular routine of camp life, and 
actually begun fixing up again as if to stay. A sad event, on the 
Arago, is mentioned by Band Master Ingalls. A little girl of 8 
died on the 8th from sea-sickness, the mother, a brother and a sister 
being on board. This little unfortunate was the daughter of Lieut. - 
Col. Hall, Provost Marshal at Hilton Head, who knowing his family 
was coming must have anticipated much pleasure ; but one can only 
imagine his grief upon the arrival of the steamer. The passengers 
on the Arago were treated to a scare upon the arrival off Port Royal 
(9th). The steamer ran aground, but was soon otT again, and the 
Captain informed the passengers that the buoys were displaced and 
the lightships destroyed, and that without doubt the rebels were in 
possession of Hilton Head ! The steamer was then run out to sea, 
and the four howitzers on board were loaded. At noon, observations 
were taken, when it was found that they were some 20 miles north of 
the desired haven. No further difficulty was had. As the Arago 
arrived on the 9th (with mail, etc.) , the officers and others mentioned 
as having left New York in her arrived and reached their posts the 
next day (10th). 



258 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[3Iar. '63. 



We had a town iiieetiug ou Piuckney on the 10th and voted for 
Governor, the majority being for Eastman, democrat. A diary says : 
' ' There were few among ns politically sound enough to endorse the 
resolutions adopted by the committee which nominated Harrison." 

AVe were getting sliort of officers, and in consequence, on the 11th, 
First Sergts. Ackerman (D), Kirwin (C), Trickey (G), Edgerly (K) 
and Sergt. "Woodbury (A), were all ordered to act as 2d lieutenants 
and command the Camp Guards. Same niglit we got a little excited 
by the beating of the long roll. The rebels made a dash ou Spanish 
"Wells (on Hilton Head), not far distant from us (six companies, 
Pinckney), and captured, so it was said, a lieutenant and S men. 
"We were kept in line till sunrise. The official report of the affair 
said the attack was by 70 rebels, and was a complete surprise ; that 
the capture was of a lieutenant and 3 men of the signal party, and 
in addition five pickets. 

Sergt. Roger "W. "WoodUny of Co. A, in charge of the picket 
guard on the 13th, had three negroes come in in a boat : — 

Cyrus, owned by Wm. Richardson, Svunter Dist., S. C. 
Wiggin, " " Joseph Stouey, Hilton Head, " 
Robert, " " Dr. Puflingtoii, Goose Creek, " 

The second named was at Hilton Head when it was captured. 
Our camp (the six companies) was located nearly opposite Battery 
Mitchel, Skull Creek lying between. We had a small earthwork out- 
side our camp, behind which 
we rallied at the slightest sign 
of danger. At one of these 
frequent alarms, it is related 
of a waggish private (name- 
less here forevermore), that 
as the Colonel was hastening 
from tent to tent to arouse 
the men, he shouted after 
him, asking " Shall we wear 

di'ess coats, or blouses ? " He 

~ was a cool one, and we had 

no occasion to buy a refrigerator for him. Pinckney Island was pro- 
lific in many things — among others, deer, though they were not 
numerous ; and there were no game laws to deter us from at least 
firing at one. Our means of communication with Hilton Head Island 
was by a row boat manned by negroes, and Richard Thomas of K was 
the coxswain in charge. In order that we should not feel isolated, 
two men from each company were permitted to go to the Head daily. 
Sometimes they returned in as good condition as when they started, 
sometimes otherwise. The shooting of deer had become an infatuation, 
especially among the shoulder-strapped gentry. One of our own offi- 
cers was gone so long after deer that his case was reported to Head- 
quarters. He brought back several deer and was forgiven. 

Capt. Clark, on the 15th, reported the result of a reconnoissance 
up the May River, with detachments of Cos. A and F. The "re- 
sult" : not a rebel was seen. Capt. Randlett was with the party. One 




Mar. '63.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 259 

of our most important picket posts was on the westerly side of the 
ishmd, at wliat was called Chimney Point and from which Ave could 
plainly see our opponents on the other side of the creek. 'Twas in- 
tensely interesting to watch a man who might at any moment raise his 
loaded gun and aim in your direction. 

We had a boat race on the IGth, and though the boats collided, 
it was conceded that C and D were the better crews. Piles were being 
driven in the creek to prevent rebel rams from passing through. The 
boat racing named above was preliminary only to the great race of 
the next day (St. Patrick's Day). 

The 17th was a day to be remembered. How everybod}' enjoyed 
it. A potato race between John Crosbie and Mike Mulligan, both of 

C, was won by the latter. He picked up 100 potatoes laid a j^ard 
apart, one at a time, in 44 minutes, travelling about live and three- 
fourth miles during the ceremony. There was also a foot race and 
boat races. In the latter, K and D made time as follows : K, 8-47 

D, 8-59. 

A serenade band was gotten up, consisting of five of the Drum 
Corps and five of Co. A. The list was as follows : — 
Charles H. Derby .... Manager and Bones. 

Joel Veasey Musical Director and Violin. 

Michael E. A. Galviu . . . Treasurer and Triangle. 

John C. Hagan Basso. 

Wm. Hammett First Singer. 

Thos. McEnry Flute. 

Sergt. John N. Chase . . Violin. 
John G. Graham .... Basso. 
Geo. W. Spencer .... Tenor. 
Fred Waters 

This most excellent troupe serenaded Col. Jackson, Capts. Al- 
len and Clark and others. The following programme was for their 
opening and deserves a place in history : — 

1. Overture Baud. 

2. " We Roam thro' Forest Shades " . . . Chorus. 

3. Selection Band. 

4. " Seeing Nellie Home" Spencer. 

5. " Twinkling Stars " Hammett. 

6. Overture Band. 

7. "GirlinBlue" Derby. 

8. Selection Band. 

9. "PompeySnow" Hammett. 

10. Overture Band. 

11. " I 'm Leaving Thee in Sorrow " .... Spencer. 

12. " Faded Flowers " Hammett. 

Here was a good round dozen set pieces, and they were well 
rendered and elicited unbounded applause. In fact, the serenaders 
made their mark. The writer is indebted to Spencer's diary for the 
full list, etc., as given. Had a printed programme been distributed, 
there is no doubt whatever that several would have asked ' ' How the 
dickens can Mike Galvin play on a treasurer and a triangle at the 
same time? and what sort of an instrument is a treasurer anyhow." 

Spencer's diary relates the vicissitudes of the troupe, how they 
tried to keep up the organization, and were prevented by the activi- 



260 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3Iar. '63. 

ties of the service. The troupe never, later, were in better condi- 
tion than at Pinckney Island. Tradition has it that we had a cock- 
fight that day, but there is no confirmation of it. We had more 
boat racing on the 18th, the boys having got warmed up on the sub- 
ject. Cos. A, C and F contested, the latter getting the prize. 

On the 18th we were again ordered to get ready to move. The 
cooks began to prepare the five days' rations. A part of the drum- 
mers were directed to go with the Surgeon, and the others with the 
colors. At evening all orders to get ready were countermanded. 

Col. Jackson began the building of a wharf on the IDth — a very 
much needed convenience. 

The monitors and mortar boats all left the harbor on the 25th, 
and we were again led to believe we would soon be called for. 

The Second Brigade Band, the new organization previously al- 
luded to, were invited up to Pinckney to make us a little visit, and 
reached there the 26th. They were composed in part of our old 
band, and hence our regard for them. The Band Master (Ingalls) 
had gone to New York to buy new instruments and further recruit 
for the Band, not yet full. During his absence the leadership fell 
upon Mr. Tottingham, who did himself credit. Col. Jackson, ever 
on the alert to please the men, went to the Head on the Wasliivgton^ 
bringing back the Band. They staid with us four days ; and to say 
that we enjoyed their music and their presence would be superfluous. 

Hearing that prowlers had been seen on the island, a detail of 
one officer and twenty men were sent to scour the island on the 27th, 
but found nothing. That day, also, troops left Hilton Head for the 
destined point, and the movement was fairly inaugurated. The 
band served at dress parades and at guard mount, and also serenaded 
somebody every evening while with us. 

On the 30th Col. Jackson announced by an order the following 
newly-arrived commissions and consequent changes : — 

1st Lieut. H. C. Handerson to be Captain and to K. 
2cl " J. J. Donohoe " 1st Lieut. " C. 

Sergt. J. W. Ackerman " 2d " " D. 

1st Lieut. Jackson was transferred to G. 
" " Dearborn " " " H. 

2d " Head " " " C. 

Capt. Handerson relieved 1st Lieut. Smith in the command of K. 

A letter to the New York Times, dated 30th, said that a brigade 
of troops had already been sent to a rendezvous conveniently near 
the place of expected operations, and most of the monitors had fol- 
lowed them, leaving only three at Hilton Head. The same day 
there was quite a storm, which did great damage to material ready 
to ship for the field of operations, chief among which were the surf 
boats, which were considerably damaged and probably delayed prepa- 
rations for at least a day or two. Many of the steamers in the 
harbor dragged their anchors. Co. E returned to the regiment 
(really to the old camp-ground, where only Cos. G and H were) 
from Provost duty, preparatory to the onward movement which 
seemed to have been fully set in motion. The regiment (the various 
companies) got the expected order on the 31st to move. 



Mar. '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 261 

March ended with us in a packed-up condition and in a state of 
mind fully made up that Ave were simply to start for Charleston. 
Just how and when we were to get there was of minor importance. 
We shall see, later, that the path was a thorny one and beset with 
difficulties, the magnitude of which we hadn't then the slightest con- 
ception. 



SURPLEIVIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 5S of the 10th was a proclamation b}^ the Presi- 
dent, permitting all soldiers absent without leave to return on or be- 
fore 1st day of April next, with only a loss of pay and allowances 
during their absence. Report to .... at Concord, Maj. J. H. 

Whittlesey, U. S. A to be sent to regiments without delay. 

This was a very generous offer, and produced the personal presence 
of a large number of men who were willing to be forgiven. 

General Order 73 of the 24th (really a Resolution of Congress : 
No. 61) directed the Paymaster-General to take immediate steps to 
pay all sick and wounded soldiers in convalescent camps, hospitals 
or elsewhere, within 60 days from the od inst. The same order 
authorized brevets. 

General Order 80 of the 31st directed that all surgeons and as- 
sistant surgeons who were absent on other than regimental duty to 
return at once to their regiments, and not to be detached thereafter 
except in cases of necessity. 

IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 16 of the 5th was a sort of proclamation b}^ Gen. 
Hunter, the language of which it is deemed best to insert in another 
place (see Gen. Hunter's Personal). 

General Order 17 of the 6th ordered a draft of able-bodied male 
negroes, between 18 and 50, in the Department, who were not em- 
ployed in the Quartermaster or Commissary Departments or were not 
private servants to officers. These drafted men to serve as non- 
coms, and privates in the various regiments and brigades now organ- 
ized and in process of organization under Gen. Saxtou. This draft 
was to furnish acclimated men to garrison the forts while the others 
(whites) were to take part in the campaign then soon to open. (See 
General Order 24.) 

General Order 18 of the 7th was full of instructions as to dis- 
embarking from vessels into boats, and how to " pull for the shore." 
At one whistle (if towed), the steamer starts for the shore; at two 
whistles, prepare to cast loose ; at three whistles, cast loose and 
" pull for the shore." Soon as the boat strikes the shore, jump out 
and rush up the beach, and form line facing the land. Leave knap- 
sacks under the seats ; the boat in charge of a coxswain and two 
rowers. After troops land, these men to put the knapsacks ashore, 
and pile them up carefully above high water. The troops to have 
four days' cooked rations and 60 rounds of ammunition. 



262 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [3far. '63. 

General Order 19 of the 10th cut down our otficers to one paltry 
gallon of commissary whiskey per month. How sad ! And no soldier 
is to have any except on certificate of proper medical officer that it is 
necessary for medical pui-poses. The order then very heartlessly said 
pickets were not entitled to it (whiskey) under any circumstances, 
and ordinary fatigue duties did not justify its issue. All oflicers were 
called upon (including those who have and use that paltry gallon per 
month) to discourage the general use of the aforesaid whiskey. The 
order also fired a hot shot at sutlers (see Sutlers), and made bold to 
mention that the expedition was about to start, etc. 

General Order 20 of the 11th fired a round of grape and canister 
at the Company Fund, that valuable friend of the soldier in time of 
trial (not by general court-martial. See Company Fund). 

General Order 22 of the 14th said, owing to the great expense 
of fresh meat the issue to be limited to three times in ten days, and 
so far as was practicable to be, during ten days (of meat) : 3 issues 
pork, 2 issues bacon, 2 issues snlt beef, 3 issues fresh meat. Other 
details were in the order, but the above are the most important. 

General Order 23 of the 16th appointed three officers of the 
Regular Army as mustering officers, viz. : Maj. E. W. Smith (1st 
Lieutenant Fifteenth U. S. Infantry), Commissary of Musters for the 
Department; 1st Lieutenant Guy V. Henry (First U. S. Artillery), 
Assistant Commissary of Musters, and 1st Lieutenant John R. Myrick 
(Third U. S. Artillery), Assistant Commissary of Musters. These 
officers were appointed under General Order 48 of the War Depart- 
ment, and were to muster in and out all volunteers (officers and men) 
requii'ing such service. Lieut. Henry was assigned to Port Royal 
Island, and all others in Department were to be looked after by Lieut. 
Myrick. (See also General Order 27.) 

Up to this time, officers who had been promoted from one grade 
to another, instead of being mustered out of former and in in new 
grade, had simply been sworn to faithful discharge of those duties, 
generally before a field officer of the regiment or by some other officer 
who held a sort of quasi appointment as judge advocate or similar 
distinguished title. Therefore a search for the dates of musters in 
and out of officers previous to this time will be futile. 

General Order 24 of the 19th modified General Order 17 so as to 
exempt negroes employed in the Engineer Department on permanent 
fortifications from the draft. The same order warned plantation super- 
intendents, tradesmen, sutlers, landholders, speculators and others that 
they must not secrete or harbor negroes who were liable to the draft. 

General Order 26 of the 20th developed the fact that so large a 
number of refugees were then coming in that they needed regulating ; 
and all such were ordered to be sent to the Provost Marshal General 
at Hilton Head at once. Capt. A. M. Kinzie, Aide-de-Camp, and 
Lieut. Richard Skinner, Acting Aide-de-Camp on Gen. Hunter's Staff, 
were to examine all such, with a view to obtaining information regard- 
ing the enemy. 

General Order 27 of the 25th revoked the appointments of Lieuts. 
Henry and Myrick as Assistant Commissaries of Musters, and ap- 



Mar. '63.^ 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



263 



pointed in their stead 1st Lieut. Charles H Hay, Third U. S. Cavalry, 
for all the Department except the Eighteenth Army Corps (reinforce- 
ments under Brig. -Gens. Ferry and Heckman) : and these to be in 
charge of 2d Lieut. Richard Skinner, Tenth U. S. Infantry. 



The Department Statistics for March, l-sGo, are: Total troops, 
26,538; wounded and sick, 3,802; died, 10; cases wounded, etc., 
178 ; died of wounds, etc., 2. 



The Monthl}' Return shows : — 

Field and Stafl" 4 men, officers. 

Co. A 90 " 3 " 

B 87 " 3 " 

C 78 " 3 " 

D m '' 3 " 

E (On Provost Guard.) 

F 86 men, 3 officers. 

G 02 " 3 " 

H G7 " 3 " 

I 85 " 3 " 

K (!8 " 3 " 

Present aggregate 833 Avitli E. 

Aororeo-ate last reoort ^ '^^'^ without E. 

A^^ie^ateiastrepoit . . . . ( 833 with E. 

One, of I (Burgess) , enlisted in the regular army before the 
order was received forbidding further enlistments. 

1st Sergt. J. W. Ackerman of Co. D has been promoted to 2d 
Lieutenant and assigned to same company. 

Two men have died of disease : A, 1 ; B, 1. 

2d Lieut. Handerson of Co. K has been commissioned 1st Lieu- 
tenant and assigned to same company. Capt. Butterfield of K and 1st 
Lieut. Cornelius of D have been discharged for disability. 

OfHcers in arrest, 1 (Capt. Wilbur). Officers detached: C, 1 ; 
H, 1 ; K, I : total, 3. (E not included.) 

ABCDEFGHI K Totals. 

Sergeants .5554555455 

Corporals 8 8 8 7 8 S s G 8 8 

Absent sick ....110 022100 7 

Absent in arrest ...0 01002101 5 

Prisoners of war . 2 22 24 

Detached 7 5 10 7 110 1 29 

Discharged for disability 2 002031120 11 




3 



r°^ 




CANISTER 



zT 



^ STRETCHER, ^ 



(264) 



APRIL, 1863, 




'LTHOUGH March came, and left ns, as a lion (couchant), 
April came in, at least, in the same manner. We were 
packed up, with all that these words impl}'. A regimental 
hospital diar}' shows that the sick were turned over to the 
General Hospital at Hilton Head the first day. Troops 
were then arriving at Hilton Head from various points, 
and almost at once leaving for the point of concentration. 
The double-turreted monitor Keokuk left the harbor the 
1 St. Five days' rations arrived for the regiment, and new clothing 
was issued. 

On the 2d several men detailed on extra dut}' at the Head returned 
to the regiment for duty. Same day, Capt. Allen shot himself in the 
leg, by accidentally discharging his own revolver. (See his Personal. ) 
The six companies on Pinckney Island and Co. I (at Pope's, 
opposite) broke camp on the 3d and went on board the George Wash- 
ington^ and with their baggage were all settled thereon before dark. 
During the evening we started for Hilton Head ; but on coming into 
Broad River Ave struck a gale, and had to steam over to near Bay 
Point, where we anchored. The George Washington sprung aleak, 
and the boys had to pump for dear life, the water gaining on us for 
awhile and creating quite an alarm. The companies at Hilton Head 
(E, G and H) embarked same day on the Mary A. Boardman. 

On the 4th the companies were shifted about, probably to equal- 
ize cargoes, so that A, B and D were on the Schooner Rhodella Blue, 
to be towed ; and C, E, F, G, H, I and K were on the Mary A. Board- 
man. The troops on the Rhodella Blue were in charge of Lieut. -Col. 
Bedel, and those on the 3Iary A. Boardman under Col. Jackson. 

The -ith was a day of preparation — of getting matters into shape 
for moving, as will be seen. Gen. Terry issued General Order 2, 
from Headquarters at Hilton Head, concerning troops of the Division 
of the Tenth Army Corps under his command, as follows : — 



First Brigade, 

Col. Giiss. 
Niuety-seventh Pennsylvania. 
Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. 
Eiglitli Maine. 



Second Brigade, 

Col. Putnam. 
Third New Hampshire. 
Fourth New Hampshire. 
Seventh New Hampshire. 
Sixth Connecticut. 



(265) 



266 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

The New South of the same day, as if imbued with the spirit of 
the movement, had a little poetry on the subject, one verse of which 
is inserted : — 

Come fill yonr glasses, boys, 

Aud let the toast be sped : 

A long adieu to sand and fleas 

Adieu to Hilton Head ! 
Thns tenderly and sadly, boys, 

We breathe before we go 

A long adieu to Hilton Head, 

Adieu to "Robbers' Row." 

For Charleston we are bound, boys, etc. 

The same day Gen. Terry assumed command of the Post of Hilton 
Head, by order of Gen. Hunter. 

Col. Putnam, Commanding Second Brigade, issued the following 
same day : — 
Col. .John H. .Jackson, Commanding Third New Hampshire Vols. 

Sir : At 3 a.m. tomorrow (5th) you will make sail with your regiment 
for Stono River. Follow the flagship of the Division. 

We got a mail the last thing before we were to start ; and at 
sitch a time it was very welcome. In accordance with the instruc- 
tions, we weighed anchor at .3 a.m. on the 5th and went directly to 
Stono, getting there about 7 p.m. We waited till 6 for a pilot, and 
we then steamed into the Inlet and anchored, the fleet lying all around 
us. The Rhodella Blue tried to sail, but the Mary A. Boardman 
came up with her and took her in tow. During the 6th, as we lay at 
anchor, some of our boys {pnen would n't have done such a thing) got 
down among the stores and broke open a barrel of sugar and feloni- 
ously and clandestinely abstracted about a third of its toothsome con- 
tents before discovery by the powers that be. It was said that Coles 
Island and Folly Island were well provided with our troops — a part 
of the expedition. We were told that the attack by the navy would 
take place on the morrow, and we might all be called upon to sail 
Charleston- ward. It was estimated there were lyiug there about 
16,000 men. 

The 7th dawned upon us, the day destined to be a noted one in 
history. Four days' rations were issued. These were reinforced by 
purchases from a sutler schooner near by. The expected tiring was 
begun about 3 p.m., a full account of which follows : — 

NAVAL ATTACK OX FORT SUMTER (April 7, 1863). 

This assault, so notable in the history of the war, was begun 
about 3 P.M., and lasted till about 5 p.m. The naval force — for it 
was solely a naval affair — comprised the following : — 
New Ironsides (flagship). Commander Thos. Turner. Arm. : 2 150-pounder 

rifles, 1-1 11-inch. Fired 8 times; hit — times. 
Montauk. Capt. John L. Worden. Arm. : 1 15-inch, 1 11-inch. Fired 27 

times; hit 14 times. 
Passaic. Capt. Percival Drayton. Arm.: 1 15-inch and 1 11-inch. Fired 13 

times; hit 35 times. 
Weehawken. Capt. .John Rodgers. Arm.: 1 15-inch and 1 11-inch. Fired 

2G times ; hit 53 times. 



268 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Aiyr.. '63. 



Patapsco. Capt. Daniel Animen. Arm. : 1 1.5-inch and 1 loO-pounder, rifled. 

Fired 10 times; liit 47 times. 
Catskill. Commander Geo. AV. Rodger s. Arm.: 1 15-inch and 1 11-inch. 

Fired 22 times ; liit 20 times. 
Nantucket. Commander D. M. Fairfax. Arm.: 1 IS-inch and 1 11-inch 

Fired 15 times; hit 36 times. 
Nahant. Commander John Downes. Arm.: 1 15-inch and ] 11-inch. Fired 

15 times ; hit 30 times. 
Keokuk. Commander A. C. Rhind. Arm.: 2 11-incli. Fired 3 times; hit 

90 times. 

Total guns iu action, 23, and firing 139 times. Fuses, 3^ to 15 
seconds. A lo-inch gun required 35 lbs. of powder; the ritled guns, 
46 lbs. ; 11-inch guns, 15 to 20 lbs. Fort Sumter was fired at 125 
times. Fort Moultrie 12 times, and Fort Wagner 2 times. Sumter 
was hit 55 times. 

The Weehawken had a raft rigged upon her bow for a torpedo ; 
but after it (the torpedo) had been prepared, it is said that Capt. 
Rodgers declined to attach it to the projecting raft. 

A Confederate torpedo, containing 2,000 lbs. of powder, was 
under the J^ew Iron.sides for about an hour, in charge of Langdon 
Cheeves, who tried in vain to explode it for over ten minutes, the 
battery being out of order, much to the chagrin of the Confederates. 
The whole matter was entirely unknown to the Federals at the time. 

During the evening of the same day, the commanding officer of 
the fleet received an order from the Navy Department, dated April 
2d, directing that all iron-clads, in fit condition to move after the 
attack, be sent directly to New Orleans, reserving only two. 



CONFEDERATE ACCOUNT. 



Fort Johnson 00 00001 1 

" Sumter 4 2 2 8 7 1 13 7 41 

" Monltrie '.» 5 5 2 21 

Battery Bee 5 10 6 

Beauregard ... O 1 1 2 

Fort at Cumming's Point .110 2 

" Wagner O O 1 1 

Totals 10 3 2 1!) 7 8 18 10 77 

Fired shot 385 80 80 731 140 321 343 

Fired shell 5 45 93 

Total shot and shell, 2,229 ; powder used, 21 ,093 lbs. 3 killed, 

11 wounded. 151 shots fired by fleet, all but 24 at Sumter. Struck 
vessels, 520 times. 



Apr. '(55.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 2G9 

A Confederate aeeount of the bombardment is as follows : — 

The monitors, 8 in number, led by the Passaic, with the Ironsides in the 
center, in one line. The flght opened by Moultrie at 3 p.m. Fight ended at 
5.30 P.M. The flagstaff of Fort Moultrie was shot away, and in falling 
wounded a man, who died. Capt. Wigg, A. C. S., placed a regimental flag 
in place of the flagstaff, etc. 

During the bombardment a double-shotted 10-ineh Columbiad 
was by its own recoil thrown into the parade ground of Fort Sumter. 



The following from the Neiv York Times of 30 July 1863, 
headed "Gen. Hunter at Charleston — The Battle in the Harbor" 
(7 April 1863), in connection with the memorable bombardment, is 
inserted as worthy a place here : — 

Washington, Monday, 27 July 18(53. 
To the Editor of the N'eii- York Times : 

Permit me to correct an error which appeared in an editorial upon the 
siege of Charleston, published in the Times of last Saturday .... The 
Times states that previous to the first attack upon Charleston by the iron- 
clads, Gen. Hunter notified Admiral DuPont that the navy need expect no 
help from the laud forces. Mho on account of the paucity of their numbers, 
could only act as a garrison for any capture made by the navy. Let me 
state a few facts which would not have been proper to have divulged at an 
earlier date. On the night previous to DuPont's attack upon Fort Sumter, 
Col. Howell's brigade was thrown across from Coles to Folly Island, while 
Gen. Terry's division was also partially landed and partially retained on 
board light-draft transports in the Stono. On the day of the bombardment 
troops were massed on the northern end of Folly Island, behind the screen 
of timber immediately facing Lighthouse Inlet, and were under the imme- 
diate superintendence of Gen. Truman Seymour, Gen. Hunter's Chief of 
Staft" and of Artillery. All arrangements were made for a crossing the next 
night. Surf and india-rubber pontoon boats were in readiness, and three 
fuilbatteriesof rifled guns were upon the ground to cover the crossing .... 
it was arranged between the Admiral and Gen. Hunter that the crossing of 
Lighthouse Inlet, and the attack upon Morris Island, should not be rnade 
until the day following the iron-clad's attack upon Fort Sumter, as the ex- 
pected reduction of the work would not only save our troops from its en- 
filading fire while advancing up the island, but would also, in all probability, 
greatly demoralize the garrisons, both of Wagner and of Cuuiming's Point. 
[He then speak§ of the complete failure of the iron-clads. — D. E.] Admiral 
DuPont resolved to abandon the attack until further reinforced by iron- 
clads .... 

It was upon the communication of this resolve by the Admiral to Gen. 
Hunter that the crossing of Lighthouse Inlet was countermanded, a copy of 
the Admiral's letter being carried by Col. Halpine to the northern end of 
Folly Island, where Gen. Seymour was then busily engaged with Maj. Duane 
(U.S. Engineers), Capt. Hamilton* (U. S. Artillery), Capt. Balch (U.S. 
Steamer Pawnee), and Cols. Dandy, Guss and Howell, superintending the 
final preparations for pushing across Lighthouse Inlet. 

Gen. Seymour, after consulting with Gen. Hunter, visited Admiral 
DuPont to induce him to aid with such of the iron-clads as were fit for 
service. In this mission he failed. But so earnest, almost passionate, was 
Gen. Seymour in his desire to be allowed to attempt the crossing and attack, 
that he urged Gen. Hunter to allow the attack to proceed, even after it was 
known that no co-operation from the navy could be hoped for. To this 
Gen. Hunter strongly and peremptorily objected ; and it was for the purpose 
of impressing his views upon the Administration that Gen. Seymour, imme- 
diately after the abandonment of the attack, proceeded to Washington, 
where he had interviews with Gen. Halleck, Sec. Stanton and the President. 



270 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

Gen. Hunter was relieved 12 June 18fi3 by Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, 
and Admiral DuPont about the same time by Admiral Dahlgreu. 

After the attack on Fort Sumter by the iron-clads, Hunter says 
(see page 12, "Miscellaneous: Conduct of War," Vol. IV., 1865), 
in letter to President, that the troops on Folly Island were ready to 
cross to Morris Island, and had practically started, the boats being 
in readiness, when they were recalled, — as he then hoped, only 
temporarily, — by the announcement that DuPout had resolved to 
retire, and the army could expect no assistance from him (the navy). 
Hunter says he at once sent a staff officer on board to confer with 
DuPont, and represent the forwardness of preparations by the army 
and the evidently unprepared condition of the enemy, and that now, 
our preparations being unmasked, any delay would give the enemy 
time to prepare. DuPont declined to fire another shot. A lodge- 
ment, says Hunter, was therefore made impossible. Hunter then 
says he held on for expected assistance, improving the batteries and 
keeping the troops on Folly, Coles and Seabrook Islands. Hunter's 
letter bears no date ; but it appears to have been written the latter 
part of May. He asked the President to relieve him from co-opera- 
ting with the navy against Charleston, for that meant co-operating 
in inactivity, and opined that DuPont distrusted the iron-clads. He 
says: "Relieve me thus, and I will place 10,000 of the best drilled 
troops in the country \_i. e., those in this Department] in the heart 
of Georgia at once." 

On that eventful day, the Ironsides dropped her anchor at a 
time when she was in danger of running ashore, and in doing so 
swung around, stern shoreward, and directly over a rebel torpedo. 
The spot was nearly due east from Wagner. In vain the electrician 
in Wagner tried to explode the torpedo ; but fate was this time in 
favor of the Ironsides. The garrison had, almost to a man, their 
eyes upon what they considered the ill-fated iron-clad ; but the tor- 
pedo would not explode. Had the wires and battery been in good 
condition, our monster Ironsides would with its entire crew have been 
destroyed ; for the force of that immense torpedo was almost im- 
measurable. The lucky iron-clad very soon thereafter was away 
from the immediate vicinity of its would-be destroyer. 

The Hth found us still at anchor in the Stono. In the evening, 
Col. Jackson went with Gen. Seymour to some rendezvous, with 
others, for a consultation. 

On the day following the naval attack, and singularly too, Col. 
John Hay, the President's Private Secretary, arrived at the fleet, with 
confidential letter dated 2d, signed by Gideon Welles, Secretary of 
the Navy, instructing DuPont to send all his iron-clads fit to move, to 
the Department of the Gulf. Accompanying this was a letter from 
Asst. Sec. Fox, saying, "Retain only two iron-clads." It can hardly 
be conjectured what the condition of things would have been had 
Col. Hay arrived, say at noon of the 7th. Gen. Hunter, it would 
appear, had no knowledge of Col. Hay's arrival or of his letters ; 
for at night he proposed to DuPont to land the army on Morris 
Island, if the navy would co-operate. (See "Rebellion Record.") 



272 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

Ou the 9th, being still at anchor, two days' rations were drawn and 
cooked, and we were instructed to be ready to land. The 3fary A. 
Boardman moved toward Folly Island (the schooner in tow), and 
landed a part of the regiment, when an order came to cease ; but 
this was soon after revoked and the landing of the regiment was 
completed. We were on Folly Island, nearer than we had been to 
the rebels since Secessionville, in June 1862, so far as force and force 
was concerned. Later in the evening we moved farther into the 
woods, or thicket, more properl}' speaking. 'Twas there we found 
the wood-tick, a little, burrowing, industrious insect which imbedded 
itself in our soil (flesh) unknown to us until (and we didn't have to 
wait long) an itching sensation led to an investigation, and — there 
he was. The boys will not soon forget the wood- ticks of Folly Island. 
In general shape they resembled sheep-ticks. 

We disposed of ourselves as best we could for the night. Next 
day we cleaned up a little, preparatory to pitching camp, digging 
wells and removing underbrush, levelling off the ridges, etc. Mail. 
Special muster of all the troops. A diary says : "Evening : We've 
got to make out a special muster roll tonight. We are back on the 
Mary A. Boardman., after being on shore 24 hours." 

Re-embarkation began during tlie night, the same companies and 
officers on the same vessels as we went up there in. Corpl. Hall of 
Co. C was taken suddenly ill, and died during the evening of the 
10th, while the embarkation was going on. The necessities of the 
service required that he be buried at once, and he was so buried on 
Folly Island, our Chaplain and others going on shore expressly for 
that purpose. Even they were hurried back by explicit orders, and 
the fleet got off for Hilton Head. The burial took place about noon, 
and the fleet was well under waj' at one, arriving oft" Hilton Head 
by dark and anchoring for the night. Next morning (12th), we 
went into Hilton Head and landed, our regiment returning to its 
former camp-ground in rear of the General Hospital. We found 
that during our absence (really the short absence was of Cos. G, 
H and E only) the One Hundred and Fifteenth New York had helped 
themselves to our lumber and shades and other things we had left 
there. In fact, our camp looked barren indeed. Did the boys 
articulate in a profane manner? No, but there was Are in their eyes 
as they walked over to the camp of the One Hundred and Fifteenth 
New York ; and when they returned, shortly after, they were laden 
with "fixins." Mail. Today (12th), Gen. Hunter ordered Brig.- 
Gen. Heckman, with his brigade (Ninth New Jersey, Twenty-third 
Massachusetts, Eighty-first and Ninety-eighth New York), to New 
Berne, N. C, to help Foster out of his difficulties, and then return. 
It will be seen that owing to our receding from offensive position, the 
Department could spare some of its tro(jps. On the 13th (probably 
arriving about the 17th), the President sent DuPont instructions 
thus: "Hold your position inside the bar. If you have left it, re- 
turn to it and hold till further orders. Do not allow the enemy to 
erect new batteries on Morris Island. If he has begun it, drive him 
out," etc. This shows conclusively that he could not have known 





Lieut. Eluuidge J. Copp, 

Adjt. (War). 



Lieut. Eluridge J. Copp, 
Adjt. (Peace). 





C.\PT. Michael P. Doxley 

(War). 



Capt. Michael P. Doxley 
(Peace). 



Apr. '63.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 273 

that the Secretary of the Navy had sent the major part of the fleet 
of iron-clads away. We again began settling down to camp life ; 
but were alleged to have made frequent visits (reluctantly, of course) 
to the One Hundred and Fifteenth New York. 

Lieut. J. J. Donohoe of C got his discharge on the 14th, to 
accept the Adjutancy of the Tenth New Hampshire, which was to be 
commanded by his brother, Michael T., formerly Captain of Co. C 
of our regiment. He went North next day, with the hearty con- 
gratulations of his company on his promotion. 

Cos. D and E were directed on the 14th to proceed to certain 
outposts for duty there, but did not go till next day, and returned 
to the regiment on the 17th. They went to Jenkins Island, relieving 
a company of the Ninth Maine. Another proposed move cut short 
their stay. Same day (14th), the President sent despatch to Hunter 
and DuPont, saying in substance that no ceusure was upon them 
(referring to 7th April bombardment of Sumter) , and that there was 
hope that Morris and Sullivan's Island and Sumter would yet be taken. 



A NOVEL NAVAL MACHINE SHOP. 

The wants of our navy were fully illustrated and fully met in 
the establishment of a well-appointed and supplied shop for repairs, 
etc., as will be seen by the following from the Xew York Herald of 
the 14th. It says in substance that the shop consists of two of the 
stone fleet (sunk off Charleston) which escaped the fate of the 
others and floated into Hilton Head. The Edward has a machine 
shop and store room, hammocks, etc. The Bidia has several 
furnaces, and is also used as a store-house and for contrabands' 
quarters. Nearly 100 men employed. The material was shipped 
to Port Royal in the winter of l.SGl, in charge of Wm. B. Cogswell, 
a master mechanic. The foreman was Mr. D. Campbell. The 
Avhole was under W. S. Kimball, master machinist. The two vessels 
were chained together. 

The first intimation we had of another move was the issue of 15 
days' rations on the loth. 

Again the One Hundred and Fifteenth New York. A diary says : 
" With the assistance of Cos. A and C, we moved our hospital tents 
today over from the One Hundred and Fifteenth New York and partly 
got them up." It will be seen that there were other regiments in 
the service outranking the Third New Hampshire in point of modesty. 
Today our Asst. Surg. Farrar was ordered on special duty, to take 
charge of all the sick at certain outposts (see his Personal). On 
the IGth the following curiouslv worded order was issued by Gen. 
Terry (G. O. 7) :— ^ 

The temporary suspension of the expedition against Charleston being 
now at an end, this Division Is organized as follows : — 
First Brigade : 

Col. Gnss, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania. 

Eighth Maine Coi. Rust. 

Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania . . Col. Strawbrldge. 
Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania . . Lieut. -Col. Duer. 



274 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

Second Brigade : 

Col. Louis Bell, Fourth New Hampshire. 
Third New Hampshire .... Col. Jackson. 
Fourth New Hampshire . . . Lieut. -Col. Sleeper. 
Sixth Connecticut Maj. Meeker. 

Though this order was dated 16th, it was to a certain extent 
misleading ; for during the evening of the same day, the Ninty- 
seventh Pennsylvania embarked, as a part of the new movement. 

DuPont (16th) wrote the Secretary of the Navy that he was 
doing all he could to forward the cause, and said he felt painfully 
struck by President Lincoln's order, and requested the Department 
not to hesitate about relieving him by an oflicer who, in its opinion, 
was more able to execute that service in which he had had the mis- 
fortune to fail — the capture of Charleston. Under date of the 16th 
Gen. Hunter offered a reward of So. 00 each for capture of Lieut. 
Keith, Twenty-third New York, and Lieut. Moffat, Ninth New Jersey, 
both Acting Signal Officers and reported as deserters. None of our 
regiment skirmished for those two men, so far as is known. 

What we had been looking for (since issue of the 15 days' 
rations) arrived on the 17th: for on that day orders were issued 
relieving all of Third and Fourth New Hampshire and Sixth Connecti- 
cut on fatigue, guard, outpost or special duty. This it will be seen 
covered the new brigade and relieved Dr. Farrar and Cos. D and E. 
Four days' cooked rations were ordered, and we were directed to 
pack up. The whole camp was in a quiver of suspense and anxiety ; 
for it was fair to presume that we were to proceed more aggressively 
than before and somebod}^ get hurt. 

Lieut. Hopkins was discharged the 17th, he having resigned on 
account of ill health. 

We Avere paid oft" on the l<sth, for four months. The Chaplain, 
as was his custom, got a large slice of the money to send home for 
the men, by express ; and we were informed that the morrow's sun 
would see its embarking for Charleston ; and before night we were 
ordered to embark at 7 a.m., next day (19th). The yen- South 
(18th) said, editorially: "The reinforcements now ordered and on 
their way from the North will soon elevate this Department to the 
first rank in public interest and military importance. We are not at 
liberty to give further indications ; but this much is certain, that the 
greybacks along the Southern coast are about to have some lively 
and interesting times." The same issue said Gen. Seymour and Gen. 
Viele were expected on the Arago. Gen. Viele did not arrive, how- 
ever, though ordered. The order was revoked (see his Personal). 

The embarkation took place as ordered, and on three vessels, as 
follows : — 

Field and Stafl'and Cos. F, G, H and K, on steam propeller Seniiiwl. 

Cos. A, B, C and D, under Lieut. -Col. Bedel, on schooner Hiijldander. 

Cos. E and I, under Maj. Plimpton, on steamer Boxton. 

The regiment left the harbor about 4 p.m., the schooner in tow of 
a tug. As Cos. E and I, under Maj. Plimpton, did not absolutely go 
with the regiment at this time, they will be accounted for separately 
and now. It would appear by various diaries that these two com- 



Aj>r. '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIKE REGIMENT. 275 

panies were joined by two others of the Seventh Connecticut : and 
these four companies (on the Boston) were to have been Gen. Terry's 
body-guard. There was some "hitch "in the matter; for on the 
20th tiie two companies of Third New Hampshire (and probably the 
two of Seventh Connecticut) landed, at Hilton Head and went to 
their respective old camp-grounds to await developments. 

On the 26th they were on post guard at Hilton Head, and on the 
28th they were on picket at Hilton Head. It may safely be said that 
ver}" soon thereafter these two companies were sent over to Bay 
Point (opposite Hilton Head), where they occupied the works there, 
and so remained until June, when they rejoined the regiment, then 
at St. Helena and not far distant. The dates, etc., will be given 
later on in their appropriate places. Here these two companies 
drilled as heavy artillery, using the mounted guns. A Regular Army 
Ordnance Sergeant was stationed there ; and it is presumed that Cos. 
E and I became skilled, so far as could be during their brief stay, 
as heavy artillerists. We now return to the regiment proper (/. e., 
eight companies). 

We reached Edisto Inlet about 9 a.m. on the 20th, and dropped 
anchor within the Inlet. Several monitors were there, and a large 
number of troops. 

Nothing of interest on the 20th and 21st except that the 
Chaplain was still collecting money to be sent home. Some of the 
boys thought it the proper caper to reserve a sufficient sum to enable 
them to intelligently^ play the game called " bluff." (Jur brigade was 
inspected (all at anchor) on the 22d by Col. Louis Bell of the 
Fourth New Hampshire, our new brigade commander. There was a 
sutler's schooner near us, and it was astonishing to see how many 
men wished to be introduced to him. He was a popular man and 
generally on hand. Our men almost invariably left a small pittance 
with him, just to recompense him in some small degree for his hospi- 
tality, the evidence of Avhich was readily seen on their return. Some 
of the troops had been landed (prior to 22d), as there was a slight 
skirmish the 22d on Edisto, and one or two of our men (not Third 
New Hampshire) got hit. 

Band Master Ingalls arrived from the North the 22d, with re- 
cruits for the Second Brigade Band. 

On the 23d Col. Jackson and 45 men went ashore to skirmish 
on an island adjoining Edisto, the skirmishing being under the 
immediate charge of Lieuts. Stearns and Wadsworth. Deer and 
cattle were seen, but no rebels. 

We were permitted to go ashore on the 24th to bathe and stretch 
our legs. Mail — a big one. The Nahant arrived same day, making 
five monitors lying in the Inlet. Scouting parties had shot cattle, 
and as a result we had fresh beef for our stomachs. 

No "favorable mention" has been made of the Sentinel, that 
beautiful steamer on which the Headquarters of regiment and five 
companies were quartered so long. It was one of that class of 
steamers which have a peculiar roll, in a high sea, from side to side — 
so fearfully eccentric that unless one holds on to something sub- 



276 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

stttutial he will be pluugecl headlong into the seething sea. It 
would n't and did n't pitch to any appreciable degree, because the 
boys said it had n't been taught it when young. Advauciug age 
was only too apparent. The officers' quarters were hardly as good 
as the men's, and as for speed of the craft, it was never spoken of, 
and there was probably ample proof that it was not one of its attri- 
butes. The boys will all remember the Sentinel. 

On the 25th, Gen. Hunter (Special Order 235) directed the 
Sixth Connecticut and Fourth New Plampshire to be landed on Folly 
Island, reporting to Brig. -Gen. Yogdes for duty; and also ordered 
the Third New Hampshire aud Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania to be 
landed at Botany Bay Island, and these, with the Ninety-seventh 
Pennsylvania (to be sent from Seabrook Island), to constitute a 
Post, under Col. Henry R. Guss, Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania. 

The above order was in part revoked on the 27th, by Hunter: 
ordering the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania to remain on Seabrook 
Island ; and the Third New Hampshire and Seventy-sixth Penn- 
sylvania to be (upon landing) in charge of the senior officer present 
(Col. Jackson, Third New Hampshire), who must report for orders 
to Gen. Stevenson, Commanding U. S. Forces on the Edisto River. 

Sunday, the 26th, we had services between decks by our Chaplain 
and the men sung a few sacred songs. 

We began to land on the 28th, on Botany Bay Island, about 
half being landed before dark. Those landed had to face a violent 
rainstorm all night. 

The War Department on the 29th issued an order (General 
Order 110) giving the "make-up" of a regiment and a company of 
volunteers (infantry only given here) : — 
One Regiment of Infantry (10 companies) : 

1 colonel, 1 chaplain, 

1 lieutenant-colonel. 1 sergeant-major, 

1 major, 1 regimental quartermaster-sergeant, 

1 adjutant (extra lieutenant), 1 regimental commissary sergeant, 

1 quartermaster (extra " ), 1 hospital steward, 

1 surgeon, 2 principal musicians. 

2 assistant surgeons, 
One Company of Infantry : 

1 captain, 4 sergeants, 

1 1st lieutenant, 8 corporals, 

1 2d lieutenant, 2 musicians, 

1 1st sergeant, 1 Avagoner, 

G4: privates — minimum. 82 privates — maximum. 

The same order treated of Chaplains. (See Chaplain Hill's 
Personal.) 

The 29th saw us all landed and busily engaged in cleaning up 
the place selected for our camp. The Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania 
also landed and went into camp near us. Botany Bay Island deserves 
some notice. The name itself is suggestive, but not more than the 
facts warranted. The spot selected by the Third New Hampshire was 
the site of an old rebel earthwork called in its day " Fort Seabrook." 
A diary very irreverently says: "Such a place the Lord seldom 
makes .... part of an old magazine — the entrance — was in sight. 



Apr. '63.'] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



Dug it open and crawled in." (What courage ! ) Another writer says : 
" The island took its name from the fact that some 1 ,r>00 negroes 
were sent here to keep them out of the reach of the rebels at the time 
Edisto Island was taken possession of by our gunboats. It was for- 
merl}^ known as Point of Pines. It is principall}' covered with pines, 
live oaks, cypress, palmettoes, cedars, magnolias and palms." Another 
writer says: "A little speck of land, inhabited only by pests that 
bite, stino- and crawl." 




CAMP MISERY, BOTANY BAY ISLAND S.C. (SPEtVCEl 



Col. Jackson established his tent on the parapet of the old work, 
giving him a sort of " overlook" both ways, mland and seaward. 

The ditticulties, in the way of unevenness of the ground, the 
underbrush, stumps, trees, etc., were greater than we had ever before 
encountered ; but all these rapidly disappeared, and we soon had a 
very good and clean camp. Col. Jackson being in command of Post 
(Third New Hampshire and Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania), Lieut. -Col. 
Bedel was in command of the regiment. Adjt. Libby was Acting 
Assistant Adjutant-General on Col. Jackson's Staff. The small flies 
troubled us exceedingly. They were legion and their sting was too 
large by far when one considered their size. The sutler's schooner 
still remained at anchor near us. This was significant and worthy 
to be specially noted. 

Capts. Randlett and Allen joined the regiment (visit, probably) 
on the 30th ; also Private Thomas Hanson of Co. A. The two former 
were from Hilton Head (Randlett sick, and Allen wounded by acci- 
dent). Private Hanson was fresh from recruiting service in New 
Hampshire. 

The eight companies were mustered on the 30th by Col. Jackson, 
and the two companies at Hilton Head bj" Major Plimpton. 



278 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Apr. '63. 

We heard a rumor on the 30th that the Third Regiment of colored 
soldiers was almost full. A letter of that date to the yew York Times 
said : — 

The main bodj- of Hunter's army did not return to Port Royal after the 
failure of the late attack, and yet remain in strong force at North Edisto 
and Stono Inlets. Kiawah Island is occupied completely, and the troops on 
Coles and Folly Islands are intrenching. Reinforcements and supplies were 
still going forward from Port Royal. The iron-clad fleet has been repaired. 
Two monitors at Port Royal and one at North Edisto. The JVpvj Ironside.^ is 
blockading Charleston. Drafting all the able-bodied negroes into the army 
is being prosecuted vigorously. On Friday last, a meeting was held at Hilton 
Head, to which tlie blacks were invited. A crowd came to listen to addresses 
from several gentlemen, explanatory of the object of the government in order- 
ing a draft. The enthusiasm of tlie negroes was excited, and upon a call for 
volunteers every able-bodied man in the audience stepped forward and asked 
to have his name entered on the roll. One hundred recruits were thus 
obtained for Col. Bennett's Third South Carolina regiment. On Hilton Head 
there are (100 blacks capable of bcaiing arms, and they are at once to be 
organized into companies — to pass half their time in drilling and half in the 
Quartermaster's Department. The First South Carolina (Col. Higginson) is 
doing good service on outpost duty at Port Royal Ferry. The men are in 
plain sight of the rebels, who express great disgust at having to contend 
against tlieir late servants. The Second Regiment (Col. Montgomery) is en- 
camped near Beaufort. It numbers 600 men. 



SUPPLKNIENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 82 of the 1st ordered that a special muster be made 
of all the troops on the 10th inst., or as soon thereafter as practicable. 
Rolls to be sent in at once. These were to be the basis for drafts to 
fill up regiments and batteries to their proper complements. 

General Order 83 of the 2d (under Act of Congress) provided 
that any volunteer or militiaman then in service who may re-enlist for 
one year, at the expiration of his present term, be paid a bounty of 
$50 — one-half cash, one-half at expiration of new term. For those 
who re-enlist for two years, $1 00 bounty — one-fourth cash. In both 
cases furlough for 30 days at and from re-enlistment. 

General Order 86 of the 2d provided (Act of Congress) that any 
regiment of infantry now or hereafter reduced (as set forth in Sects. 
19 and 20 of Act of 3d March) shall be consolidated into five com- 
panies or less, and the colonel, major and one assistant surgeon be 
mustered out. (The reduction was one-half in total members.) 

General Order 92 of the 8th provided that officers and men then 
on signal duty (it does not say "in Signal Corps"), whose terms 
expire before they can be examined, may be retained under act of 
3 March 1863 if their conduct and qualifications are satisfactory. 

General Order 99 of the 24th provided that upon the expiration 
of term of a volunteer regiment, it be returned to the State where 
raised and promptly paid and mustered out ; that they turn over their 
arms and equipments before leaving the army ; to be transported and 



A2»: '63.] 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



fed to place of and to final payment ; the Paymaster-General to pi'o- 
vide for their payment immediately on their arrival and before they 
disperse. 

General Order 102 of the 25th provided for an extra allowance 
of candles to regimental adjutants in the field — 10 lbs. per month. 

General Order 105 of the 2.sth created the Invalid Corps, after- 
ward called the Veteran Reserve Corps. (See Invalid Corps vs. 
Veteran Reserve Corps.) 



IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

There appears to have been none of interest to the general reader 
except such as have been noted in the body of the work. It may, 
however, here be stated that a rigid quarantine was ordered on 27 
April (by General Order 34), to take effect 10 May, and Surgeon A. 
Crispell, U. S. Volunteers, was appointed the health officer, and St. 
Helena Sound selected for the quarantine ground. 



Department Statistics for April, 1863, are : Total troops, 23,514 ; 
wounded and sick, 2,844; died, 10; cases wounded, etc., 122; died 
of wounds, etc., 0. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 



Field aud Staff 
Co. A . . . 



(Hiltou Head). 



(Hilton Head). 



■i men, 

89 " 



9 officers. 
3 



Present aggregate .... 768 37 805 

Aggregate last report . . . 

Cos. E and I were on temporary duty at Hilton Head (landed 8 
May, at Baj^ Point) ; the others were on Botany Bay Island. 

One recruit has been received : Musician Livingstone, who went 
to Co. I. 

There have been five men discharged for disability : A, 1 ; H, 4. 

1st Sergt. John Kirwin of Co. C has been promoted to 2d Lieu- 
tenant and assigned to same company. 

One unfortunate — Corpl. Hall of C — has died of disease. 

1st Lieut. J. J. Donohoe of Co. C has been discharged, to accept 
the Adjutancy of the 10th New Hampshire (his brother, M. T., being 
Colonel). 

2d Lieut. Hopkins, Co. H, has been discharged for disability. 



280 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[Aj^r. '63. 



Officers in arrest, 1 (Capt. Wilbur). Officers absent with leave: 
G, 1 ; field and staff, 1. Officers absent sick: D, 1. 

ABCDEFGH IK Totals. 

Sergeants 555555. 5 5. 5 5 

Corporals 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 C 8 8 

Absent sick 4 4 C :] 1 5 5 C 1 3 38 

Absent in arrest . . 10 2 10 1 5 

Prisoners of war . . 2 13 15 

Detached 7 5 5 6 3 5 3 (5 7 7 54 




MAY, 1S63. 




'AY was ushered in with a mail and the announcement 
that strawberries were ripe. The other event of the day- 
was the beaching of our beloved Sentinel, and the hereto- 
fore invisible parts were scraped. " She will sail more 
rapidly hereafter without doubt," said one of the boys. 
Scouting parties went out nearly every day on Edisto, but 
generally saw no rebels. Each part}^ brought back what we 
called " plunder." On the 2d Gen. Hunter issued an order 
for the furloughing of not over five per cent of the enlisted men, for 
not over 30 days, for good conduct in line of duty, and directing lists 
to be made and sent to him for approval. Thirt3'-seven of our men 
got the coveted grants and went home later. 

On the 3d a scouting party (really for plunder) on a much larger 
scale than ordinarily, went over to Edisto, and with good results. 
Though it was Sunday the Chaplain was " in it," and it is to be pre- 
sumed he went under orders and under protest. He lived to return 
and preach that same day and superintend a Sabbath School. (The 
latter was reorganized.) The scouting party visited Mr. Bailey's 
plantation among others. There was a little flutter of excitement in 
Co. K on the 4th, Sergt. Campbell being reduced to the ranks and 
several corporals resigning their warrants. We, isolated as we were, 
— banished, so to speak, — had to make the most of whatever happened. 
The hours of relieving guard were changed the 4th from 4 p.m. 
to <S A.M. Capt. Ayer (the redoubtable Ayer) took the first tour under 
the new rule, as Officer of the Day ; and he got in some work worthy 
of his steel. He detected the Captain of the schooner Gen. Boyd 
bringing liquors ashore. He placed him and others whose general 
appearance indicated collusion with this smuggler in durance vile. 
The next morning he placed this Captain in a boat with a crew and 
sent him aboard his vessel, under an agreement that he should make 
sail and be off at once. He did ; but Capt. Aj'^er, from the heights of 
our battlements, saw the schooner go ashore, accidentally or pur- 
posely, on the opposite shore and beyond his jurisdiction. How 
unhappy was Ayer : once in his clutches, but now escaped ! 

The weather was getting hot ; and as we were not quite sheltered 
from the winds, the sun beat upon us fearfully. 

(281) 



282 



THIRD NE^Y HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



\_Maii '63. 



Col. Jackson, Commanding Post, was relieved on the 6th, and 
Col. Guss of Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, then on Seabrook Island, 
was placed in command. The furloughs arrived Gth. and much 
happiness resulted. 

Cos. E and I went from Hilton Head on the 7th by Steamer Phila- 
clelpliia to Bay Point (landing next day), where they were to garrison 
and learn heavy artiller3^ These two companies had been doing post 
and picket duty on Hilton Head temporarily. 

Band Master Ingalls' diary says: "7 May 1863: The two re- 
maining companies of Third New Hampshire went over to Bay Point 
today, to garrison the place." 

The Colonel himself went on one of the raids on the 9th, as far 
as Eddingsville ; but the partv was not so successful as was usual. 
Mail. 

Sunday, the 10th, Rev. Mr. Woodruff (or Woodward), of the 
Sanitary Commission, preached to us. 

The furloughs previously announced as having arrived were 
probably the blanks; for on the 12th a diary says : "All the fur- 
loughs arrived today, except for Co. G." Cos. D and F being on 
picket, the furloughed men of those companies were sent for. Only 
three in the hospital the 12t]i. 

A scoiitiug party on the 13th (Capt. Handerson and Lieut. T. M. 
Jackson with them) was ratlier disconcerted by a party of rebels, and 

discretion was considered to be 
the better part of valor. An- 
other flurry of excitement was 
caused same day by the appoint- 
ment of a Board of Investigation 
to inquire into certain charges 
against Capt. Aver (see Capt. 
Ayer's Personal) . 

The firing heard by us on 
the 14th was a rebel tribute to 
the memory of Gen. T. J. Jack- 
son, then recently deceased. 
The 14th saAv the return of Capts. Randlett and Allen (both ill 
and had been to Hilton Head). Maj. Plimpton visited us at Botany 
Bay. As if to punish the rebels for their doings of the 13th, Col. 
Jackson, Maj. Plimpton and about 80 men essayed to make a sortie 
on them, but instead ran into a party of negroes of the " Contraband 
Department." Result of the day : a large quantity of plunder. Gen. 
Hunter and Staff called at Botany Bay 14th ; and as his boat's crew 
were Co. D boys, the latter certainly had a good time. There was a 
change in the programme ; for Gen. O. S. Ferry, who came originally 
from North Carolina with Foster's forces, and latterly had been away, 
probably on leave, moved his headquarters over to our side of the 
river on thel4th and quite near us. He had been assigned to com- 
mand of all the troops on the Pklisto, relieving Gen. Stevenson, who 
was to assume command of his own brigade on Seabrook Island. The 
furloughed men embarked on the 14th on our beloved and graceful 




COOK'S HEAOGUARTERS 

BOTAN/y BA^ 10. S.C 



Mai/ '63.^ THIRD XEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 28S 

Seiifiuel for Hilton Head. The boys had a reasonable fear that 
the 80 days allowed them might be largely passed en route ta 
Hilton Head. 

Blackberries were ripe ; and as we had an experience witli them 
on Edisto in the same month of last year, we knew where they grew, 
and how. A great scout was planned for the liSth, and we got at it 
early. Col. Jackson, C'apt. Wilbur (in arrest, awaiting approval of 
sentence), Lieut. T. M. Jackson, Capt. Allen. Capt. Burnhaui, Lieut. 
Place, Lieut. J. W. Ackerman, Sergt.-Maj. Dodge and about (iO men 
started about 7.30 a.m., lauding the Colonel and a few others on Edisto, 
the boats continuing up the dyke, near our own Botany Bay, to the 
Maj. JNIurray plantation, where all the rest landed. The party did not 
remain together, as a whole, during the day. Blackberries and din- 
^ner had the effect of making the party content to stay ; and stay they 
did all night, establishing a guard and doing all things needful for 
protection against surprise. Among the places visited were the Mary 
Seabrook and Dr. Towusend plantations, a grave-yard and a mill. 
A tlat-boat was found and made good use of in transporting plunder. 
The lattev was in such large quantity that additional help was sent for 
next day to get it home. This was the largest haul we made, and 
much good the material did us. It was principally of lumber, with 
which we fixed up our quarters to a very comfortable degree. Cook 
houses were also built, and no appreciable quantit}' of lumber was 
wasted. Nobody pretended to say he did n't know anything about 
carpentering. 

For a diversion, the following is shown the reader in confidence : — 
[Gen. Ripley (Confederate) to Gen. Lee.] 

24 May 1863. 

The continued occupation and activity of the enemy on Folly Island 
may reasonably lead us to expect an attack from that direction sooner or 
later, unless we are thoroughly prepared to receive it. What their force is 
we have no means of ascertaining; and from the great reduction in our 
numbers, it is impossible to employ scouting parties in such strength as to 
furnish an approximation. Steamers are seen to communicate with them 
from time to time ; but whether they bring or carry away troops, or whether 

they are merely supply vessels, are matters of doubt Preparations 

are going on in the Engineers' Department .... for the defence of ... . 
Morris Island, but are dilatory and will not be pushed .... for a long 
period. The bridge over the first creek south of Fort Johnson is commenced. 
The ferry arrangements over Light-House Creek and the causeways over the 
Soft Marsh are only started. The progress on the battery at Vincent Creek 
[this means at Wagner, without doubt. — D. E.] .... ordered .... six 
weeks ago, consisted a few days ago in the hulk being in position and the 
collection of a few mounds of mud, sand and shells, — about one-fourth 
enough to fill the hulk, and which would hardly be sufflcient material for 
an epaulement .... Work on Fort Sumter .... going on slowly .... 
no work at Battery Bee, nor on ISIorris Island except a little by the troops 
.... uow' seven guns at southern extremity of Morris Island .... four 
commanding the Inlet .... I intend to add one 30-pounder Parrott .... 
There are no magazines there. There are two 42-pounder carronades at 
Secessionville .... two carronades at Battery Gadberry are wanted to 
complete the flank defences of Battery Wagner. 



Commissions arrived on the 25th for Sergts. Morrill and Trickey 
as 2d lieutenants. Morrill was assigned to Co. H, and Trickey to Co. 



284 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Man'63. 

I. The same day our brigade (Third New Hampshire, Seventy-sixth 
PenDS3dvania and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania, under Col. Guss of 
last named regiment) was ordered to embark for Port Royal and to 
laud at Land's End, St. Helena. We did not receive this order till 
the 31st. Gen. Hunter made an attempt ou the 2(Jth to scare the 
hundreds of gamblers, schemers and others in the Department with- 
out apparent business, by directing that all persons found in the 
Department after 20 days without a pass from the President, Secre- 
tary of War, General in Chief or himself, should be drafted (if able- 
bodied) into the depleted regiments of his command. It is sufficient 
to say no such draft was made, because the northerly bound steamers 
carried an unusually large number of passengers within the prescribed 
time. 

A diary of the 21)th says: "Very healthy here: only one in 
hospital." 

To those who read this nai-rative, lest they think we had no 
drill because of our banishment, we would say that that duty was 
continued at Botany Bay as at other places, except that as much time 
as was considered necessary was devoted to fixing up arjd almost 
daily raids. Battalion drill, under Lieut. -Col. Bedel, was mentioned 
in a diary on the 2'.)th. 

So many of our officers were away on the 30th (five went on 
pass that day to Hilton Head), that only eight were left on duty. 

Capt. Wilbur's case was heard from on the 31st, his sentence 
(of dismissal) having been approved. 'Twas Sunday; but we had 
a battalion drill, besides inspection, dress parade and services. At 
the latter, two gentlemen of the Sanitary Commission (Maltison and 
Wilson) made appropriate remarks. 

We got our order the 31st (see 2r)th) ; and rumor had it we were 
to go to assist Burnside at New Berne. 



SUPPLEMENT. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 111 of the 1st provided that volunteer regi- 
ments, at expiration of term, may take their arms to their own State, 
and there turn them over — provided the officers request it and will 
be responsible for safe keeping. 

General Order 143 of the 22d created a new Bureau in the 
Adjutant-General's Office for all matters relating to colored troops. 
The order further provided that none should recruit for colored regi- 
ments except duly authorized by the War Department, and then one 
person should only recruit for a single regiment. 



Maij '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 285 

IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

The first, ii circular, without number, of the 2d, was an evident 
intent to curtail the "leave of absence" mania among the officers. 
They were to be thereafter required to furnish data as follows : 
Number of officers already absent from regiment (with leave, de- 
tached or sick), how many vacancies exist, and how many will be left 
for duty (field or line) if application is granted. Per contra, the 
circular said that enlisted men would be granted furloughs of 30 days 
for good conduct — not over five per cent of total number. 

General Order 36 of the 5th announced the repeal (by Act of 
Congress) of the requirement that sentence of death on spies, deserters 
and mutineers be approved by the Pi'esident, and that such approval 
then rested with the Commanding General of the Department. Gen. 
Hunter assured all concerned that he would not be slow in approv- 
ing such sentences and in having them executed. He also assured 
the troops that " deserters in this Department will not be termed 
'stragglers.'" The order conveyed the information that several de- 
serters had recently escaped North on outgoing steamers, and directed 
the Chief Quartermaster to hold a fast steamer in readiness to proceed 
after such (to Fort Monroe, and telegraph) . 

The General also directed that officers appointed in colored 
regiments were not to be discharged from old regiments, but be 
mustered in both ; and if they resign or are dismissed from the 
colored regiment, they will take old rank and place in former regi- 
ment. (See General Order 42.) 

General Order 40 of the 2 2d was almost wholly devoted to 
sanitation, and directed that straw hats be furnished enlisted men. 
(Keep cool, boys ; we'll perhaps get paper collars next I) 

General Order 41 of the 26th was a broadside against the small 
arm}' of gamblers, possible spies, adventurers, etc., who came down 
to the Department on government transports. All such were for- 
bidden in future, and no one to land except military, naval or 
persons in Government employ, unless they have a pass from the 
President, Secretary of AVar, General in Chief or Headquarters of 
the Department. Those already in the Department will be drafted 
into service in 20 days if found in the Department and are able- 
bodied, and to be put into regiments from the States where they 
belong : if none in the Department, then in the weakest regiment. 
(None such were drafted : they departed in peace.) 

General Order 42 of the 28th countermanded that part of Gen- 
eral Order 36 referring to officers in colored regiments, and provided 
that all enlisted men appointed to colored regiments be mustered out 
as enlisted men when mustered in as officers. 



Department Statistics for May, 1863, are: Total troops, 
21,705; wounded and sick, 4,121; died, 9; cases wounded, etc., 
170; died of wounds, etc., 1. 



286 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[iVff// '60. 



The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field and Staff 

Co. A 

B 

C 

D 

E (Bay Point) . . . , 

F 

G 

H 

I (Bay Point) . . . . 
K 



Present aggregate 
Aggregate last report 



8 officers. 

3 

3 



35 Total, 7S(j 
37 " 805 



Asst. Surg. D. Farrar and 1st Lieut. A. J. Fogg have resigned 
iind gone home. 

No company reported a wagoner ; but such as had wagoners in- 
chided them in the number of privates. 

ABCDEFG HIK Totals. 

Sergeants 5 5 4 5 5 5 5 3 5 5 

Corporals 8 8 8 8 8 8 7 5 8 8 

Discharged for disability 114 12 10 4 3 17 
Absent within Dept. 1 - ^ , ,, . , ^., , .,, 

(EartdlatBayPt.n 
Absent without Dept. . 5 5 7 5 4 3 *]9 4 52 
*The 10 in H are nearly if not quite all prisoners of war. 



^^^^>!?.-*f#^^, 




POSSUtA 



JUNK, 1863. 




N the first day of June we got orders to move (see 25 
Ma}'). We had just got our camp in order — almost 
everj'thing adjusted to our comfort; and — 'twas sad, 
but true — we'd got to leave it all. We went at the 
packing up, braced somewhat with the determination to 
put as much of our "improvements" on the craft that 
y)lr^ should take us as was possible — all we could. On that day 
^^ Gen. Beauregard said his whole force in South Carolina was 
not over 10,000 men. He further said six regiments, under Yogdes, 
were on Folly, and sadly mentioned the fact that Yogdes was at 
Moultrie before the war, and therefore was familiar with the country. 
The da}' was cool and pleasant ; but the packing-up process went 
on, notwithstanding there was to be an eclipse of the moon at night. 
On the 2d the thermometer was 100°, a very important matter. 
Before night a high wind and heavy rain set in and delayed our 
preparations. A diary says: "No mail for twelve days." The 
drill was not omitted during our packing up. We began to put our 
"property" on the 31. A. Boardman the 4th, though the removal 
was not completed till the oth, a large scow being used to carry our 
furniture (!) to the steamer. The men embarked on the 5th, and 
we steamed away for Port Royal, arriving at Land's End, St. Helena 
Island, about 5 p.m., and landed. Our Quartermaster Hynes and 
his boat's crew got left at Botany Bay. Pitched tents before bedtime. 



ST. HELENA. 



A diary says : " Soon after our arrival at St. Helena we were 
followed by the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Forty-eighth New York, 
a regiment of ' ling-swangers' (Enfans Perclu.'<) known as the Inde- 
pendent Battalion, two batteries and two colored regiments. Brig.- 
Gen. Strong is in command of the Post. Our location is the most 
attractive for many months. Instead of sand, we find soil and luxu- 
riant vegetation. It is expected to make this the Headquarters of 
the Tenth Army Corps and that Gen. Hunter will establish his quar- 
ters here, and the army storehouses be removed here from Hilton 
Head. Already the sites have been selected for the various buildings, 
and a railroad has been surveyed for. All the able-bodied male 

(287) 



2S8 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_June '63. 

negroes have been drafted and formed into regiments. There are 
three South Carolina regiments, and another black one from Massa- 
chusetts is at Beaufort. The Seventh New Hampshire is at Hilton 
Head on outpost duty, and they are camped on our old ground of 
last summer. The plantations here furnish us a great delicacy in 
shape of plums. We visit Hilton Head occasionally, on passes, to 
visit the Seventh New Hampshire, to see our old band, and to attend 
religious services in the old hospital building, conducted by Chaplain 
Hudson, Episcopal (of the Engineer Regiment). Have had very hot 
weather lately: several days the thermometer Avas 120°." 



[Gen. Ripley (Confederate) to Gen. Lee.] 

6 June 1863. 
.... abont the 10th of March last it was deterrauied .... to have 
the southern end of Morris Island fortified .... soon after the repulse [of 
navy, 7 April] the enemy began to fortify Folly, opposite Schooner Creek, 
another creek emptying into Folly River north of it, and across tlie neck, 
separating the main island and Little Folly .... I hope to have the works 
(on south end Morris) ready to open tire by Wednesday next so as to cover 
Little Folly .... The Engineers are not under my control .... We have 
been behindhand .... the enera_v has got hii^guns in position on the neck 
of Folly, and has fired several times .... 

The 6th was fully occupied in getting things into shape and un- 
loading our earthly goods from the steamer. We had got under fair 
headway with our camp, when we got orders to move to a spot nearer 
the shore. Though an improvement, we didn't make the change en- 
tirely without profanity. The tents of the officers, hospital, etc., 
were on (near) the river bank, and we were all pleasantly situated so 
far as location was concerned ; and after straightening out matters, 
we were sorry that we had been profane. The Steamer Gen. Hunter 
touched near our camp twice a day on her trips between Beaufort and 
Hilton Head. Negroes and plums were found in abundance, and 
both were said to be ready to eat. The writer only tried the latter, 
and can vouch for their palatability. The tine breeze we got off the 
water was invigorating and seemingly uninterrupted. 

The night of the 6th was a black one and wet and windy, and 
the lightning Hashed, etc., and we stayed up a part of the night to 
hold our tents down. 

We began to eat soft bread again, the big bakery at Hilton Head 
being conveniently near. 

Capt. Maxwell and Lieut. Wadsworth returned from leave on the 
9th, and also several of the furloughed men. The writer will let the 
reader into a secret at this point. St. Helena was chosen as a spot 
where the various troops could be reorganized and drilled, prepara- 
tory to an attack on Charleston ; for (Secret No. 2) the management 
of the Department's affairs had suffered a change, or was about to 
do so. 

DuPont was to be relieved by Dahlgren, and Hunter to be re- 
lieved by Gillmore. It may be surmised that the reader smiles, as 
he reads that we were to get ready to take Charleston ; but we have 



June '6Sr\ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 289 

no control over the facial muscles of the reader. It would be useless 
to try to take Charleston without preparation ; and if one prepares 
more than once, it is not an indictable offence. 

Gen. Gillmore arrived on the 11th ; and on the 12th Gen. Hunter 
formally turned the Department over to him. A part of Co. I re- 
joined the regiment on the evening of the 13th, from Bay Point, and 
the remainder next day. 

Among the numerous eatables for our comfort at St. Helena — 
not all issued by the Commissary, however — the various diaries 
mention green cabbage, green peas, new potatoes, string beans, new 
milk, blackberries, pies, plums — we will not weary the reader by 
extending the list. 



[Gen. Ripley (Confederate) to Gen. Lee.] 

U June, 1863. 
.... Yesterday afternoon the enemy appeared to be at work on 
Little Folly .... Lieut.-Col. Yates opened fire, shelling them about three- 
quarters of an hour, putting a stop .... The main magazine for the de- 
tached batteries is completed and supplied .... 



Gen. Hunter and Staff left on the Arago on the 14th. The same 
steamer had on board Lieut. Smith, who had resigned because he had 
been "jumped," and Capt. Wilbur, who had been dishonorably dis- 
charged. 

Gen. Gillmore on the 15th offered an opportunity to such as 
desired to be examined for positions as medical officers in the colored 
regiments then forming. Signed pay-rolls same day, and were paid 
off on the 18th for months of March and April. Co. E, the only 
company away (stationed yet at Bay point) came up on tug Relief to 
get their pay. 

The IGth being the first anniversary of our fii'st battle (James 
Island), was remembered by us, and we rehearsed its scenes, incidents 
and results. 

The rebel ram Fingal was captured on the 1(3 th in the Savannah 
River. She was towed into our harbor next day (17th) , and anchored 
not far from our camp. This formidable craft was built in the shape 
of a turtle, had four heavy guns, and 160 men each armed with rifle, 
revolver and cutlass. The wounded (about 15) were put on board the 
hospital ship Vermont and the others on the Wabash. 'Twas reported 
that this ram was built by the proceeds of the sale of the jewels of the 
ladies of Savannah, specially contributed. Several of our officers 
visited the rebel ram and, incidentally, the monitor which captured it ; 
and as a result Commander John Rodgers accepted an invitation and 
supped with our officers' mess. It was said that two steamer loads 
of people from Savannah went down the river to see the Fingal retake 
Pulaski, but found their mistake just in time to escape back to 
Savannah. 

Brig.-Gen. George C. Strong arrived the 17th, relieving Col. Guss, 
and took command of our brigade. He made our Adjt. Libby his 
Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. As this was our first introduc- 



290 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJune '6S. 

tioii to him, being a new officer in the Department and one to whom 
we became much attached, we shall devote space to him separately. 
Gen. Strong took hold in earnest, and the drilling began. 

The first record of a review by Gen. Strong was on the 19th, at 
6.30 P.M. The sand blew fearfully and we had a hard time, and were 
sufficiently introduced, as we thought. The orders were very explicit, 
and even the Commissary Sergeant (Miner) and the Quartermaster- 
Sergeant (Hill) were participants in the review. 

We raised a flag-staff in front of the Colonel's tent on the 20th, 
Capt. Clark pulling the stars and stripes to the top amid cheers and 
shouts. 

The thermometer at Hilton Head 100° in the shade the 20th, but 
not quite so hot at St. Helena. We were bound as a regiment to 
observe religious matters, at least so long as we had Chaplain Hill at 
the religious helm. The frame of a new church was put up on 
Saturday, 20th. 

The Baud (Baud Master Ingalls) came over the 21st from Hilton 
Head to pay us a visit. We all felt that the Band was ours, though 
it was the " Second Brigade Band" so far as its technical name was 
concerned. Who the deuce the " Second Brigade" was then, was a 
conundrum. Most all of our officers were away, on pleasure bent ; 
and the Batid only played once for us, being stopped by a shower. 
In the afternoon we had one of those "blows " incident to the locality. 
Blow, rain, and then reverse, and then in conjunction. Had to hold 
our tents down again, though some did not succeed in keeping them 
up. We were to have target practice, so Ave could shoot a rebel off- 
hand when we went to Charleston. Co. E was relieved from duty at 
Bay Point by order dated 18th, but did not reach regiment till 2 2d. 
We were then all together again — a united regiment. 

A review on the 22d by Gen. Strong, in the following order : 
Third New Hampshire, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Fortj'-eighth New 
York, Ninth Maine, One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York. This 
would seem to fix the make-up of our brigade. Mail. 

The startling announcement was made on the 23d that Capt. 
Jackson, recently appointed Captain, and assigned to Co. B, had dis- 
covered the company to be possessed of ten corporals. That Co. B 
should be more highly favored than any other was be^^ond our ken. 
However, Capt. Jackson took the animal by the horns, and at once 
reorganized the corporals so as to have on hand the regulation number, 
eight. Had the ten continued, there's no knowing what jealousies 
might have been created in the other less favored companies ! 

The Fulton arrived at Hilton Head on the 25th from New York, 
bringing nearly all of the men furloughed from Botany Bay, and 
Alexr. La Mudge of Co. H, who had been on recruiting service. 
We fired blank cartridges nearl}'^ every day for practice (at drill). 
Troops were arriving, and munitions of war were being landed at St. 
Helena. Taken altogether the indications were that St. Helena was 
the point of departure of another expedition, and to take place soon. 

The "Zoo Zoos" created excitement and laughter wherever they 
went, either singly, in squads or as a regiment. They were the "lost 



Juno '63.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 291 

children" and technically the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New 
York. There were also there (25th) the Second South Carolina and 
Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, both colored, but quite different iu ap- 
pearance : from the fact that the former were almost to a man from 
South Carolina, and the latter almost wholly from Massachusetts. 
On the 2()th commissions arrived as follows : — 

1st Sergt. Edgerly, Co. K .... to be 2cl Lieutenant. 

" Button, Co. F •' " " 

2cl Lieut. Wadsworth '■ " Lst 

Brainard <.<..» 

Gen. Strong established a line of guards across the island the 
2()th, a little beyond and enclosing the entire encampment, the senti- 
nels being ordered to fire upou anyone Avho should attempt to go 
beyond the line without the proper pass. He evidently meant to keep 
us where he knew we were ready to be called ; and again, the above 
measure was in part attributed to the fact that the island offered great 
inducements to foragers. Mail. 

A new death-dealing machine was received at St. Helena, as a 
part of our outfit (for description see Requa Battery), and we were 
permitted to see and touch the contrivance on the 30th. 

On the 27th and 28th a general detail was made, a few each from 
several regiments, including ours, to drill with the killing machine, 
preparatory to trying it on our adversaries. Let them beware ! From 
our regiment fifteen were detailed ; and to think for a moment only 
of what those fifteen men must answer for in the day of judgment 
is terrible. 

We were confronted on the 2.sth by another death-producer in 
the shape of small-pox, which had broken out among the negroes on 
the plantations of the island. The announcement was made otticially 
and rules laid down for the isolation of the aforesaid negroes. The 
line of sentinels (see 2r)th) was required to be chosen from those 
soldiers not liable to small-pox. With these precautions as comforting 
assurances of protection, we moved along as usual, and were ready 
for the next danger, whatever it might be. The same day we had 
another of those terrific storms, — short, sharp and incisive, — with 
the usual lightning, etc. One man in the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, 
near by, was instantly killed by the electric fluid. The Weehaivken 
(monitor) lying near by, was struck twice, and we had the pleasure 
of again holding down our tents. A negro soldier of the Second South 
Carolina was shot the same day for desertion. 

We had a sham fight on the 29th, and a drill and an inspection, 
the latter by Lieut. -Col. R. H. Jackson of the Regular Army. We 
were getting busier and busier with preparations. Old and worn-out 
or seriously damaged tents, knapsacks, etc., were turned in and 
replaced with new. The men had new clothing, etc., where needed, 
and everything betokened an early departure. The Arar/o arrived 
Avith mail and Avith Gen. Terry and Staff, returning from leave, also 
one of our furloughed men. The latter had then nearly all returned. 
Possibly the arrival of Terry hastened matters, as he was of that 
kind of stuff quite necessary in an aggressive movement. 



292 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIEE REGIMENT. lJune.'63. 

We will at this moment divulge another little secret. Admiral 
Dahlgren sailed 30th from New York to relieve DuPont. Matters 
were fast approaching a crisis. 

The usual muster for pay, etc., took place on the 30th, each 
commanding officer mustering his own command. 

June is ended, and with a crisis just around the corner. 



SUPPLEIVLENX. 



IMPORTANT WAR DEPARTMENT ORDERS. 

General Order 173 of the 11th provided for method of dropping 
men from regimental returns when placed in the Invalid Corps. 

General Order 182 of the 20th provided that when a regiment was 
reduced below its minimum, the colonel and one assistant surgeon 
to be discharged. If a company was reduced below its minimum, the 
2d lieutenant to be discharged. 

General Order 191 of the 25th provided for re-enlistment of 
" Veteran Volunteers." Those between 18 and 45 may do so and shall 
reinlist for three years or during the war. These shall receive : — 

Upon muster-in $13.00 

First instalment bounty (part of $400) . . . 25.00 
Premium 2.00 

Total at muster-in .$40.00 

At first regular pay-clav after 2 months . . .$50.00 bounty. 

" """ "6 " ... 50.00 

1 year . . . 50.00 

'' " 18 months . . 50.00 

" 2 years . . . 50.00 

" 2^ years . . . 50.00 

" 3 years . . . 50.00 

Total $375.00 

Previously paid 25.00 

Total bounty $400.00 

Also to have 30 days' furlough at re-enlistment. If mustered out 
prior to expiration of the three years, the entire balance of the $400 
bounty to be then paid. 

General Order 195 of the 29th provided for a medal of honor to 
all troops who after expiration of time have offered their services in 
the present emergency, and also to all volunteer troops from other 
States who volunteered their temporary services in the States of Penn- 
sylvania and Maryland. 

General Order 196 of the 29th was wholly about brigadier-gener- 
als. Says their number is limited by law ; several are away from 
their commands ; all fit for duty must return at once ; those unfit will 
be mustered out in ten days, the wounded and recovering excepted. 



June '63.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 293 

General Order 200 of the 30th directed all company officers on 
staff duty with any general not now having a command to rejoin their 
companies at once. 

IMPORTANT ORDERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH. 

General Order 4G of the 12th announced that (xen. Hunter had 
been relieved by Gen. Gillmore. 

General Order 47 was Gen. Gillmore's, assuming command. 

General Order 49 of the loth provided that when an officer or 
enlisted man asked to be discharged for disability, the IMedical Board 
shall certify as to fitness of the officer or man for garrison duty. The 
purport of the order was to put officers and men into the Invalid Corps. 
The same order said in substance that any white soldier might be ex- 
amined with view to being appointed a surgeon in a colored regiment. 

General Order 52 of the 25th revoked all furloughs and leaves 
of absence granted by Gen. Hunter. 



Department Statistics for June, 1863, are : Total troops, 22,231 ; 
wounded and sick, 5,457 ; died, 24 ; cases wounded and sick, 172; 
died of wounds, etc., 3. 

The Monthly Return shows : — 

Field aud Statt" 5 men, 9 officers. 

Co. A 87 " 3 " 

B 85 " 3 " 

C 72 " 3 " 

D 67 " 3 " 

E 76 " 3 " 

F 84 " 3 " 

G 60 " 2 " 

H 58 " 3 " 

I 83 " 3 " 

K .^57 " 3 " 

Present aggregate 744 38 782 

Aggregate last report ... 751 35 786 

But two men have been discharged for disability : Abbott of B, 
and Roach of H. 

The following important promotions have been made : — 

1st Lieut. T. M. Jackson to Captain (B). 

2d " L. F. Place to 1st Lieutenant (B). 

1st Sergt. F. L. Morrill (A) . . to 2d " (H). 

E. J. Button (F) . . to " (F). 

Wm. H. Trickev (G) . . to " (I). 

J. Homer Edgerly (K) . . to " (E). 

These promotions changed the officers about considerably from 
one company to another. 

Other changes were: 1st Lieut. Stearns, F to C ; 1st Lieut. 
Smith, B to K (discharged same day) ; 1st Lieut. Brainard, E to K. 

Michael E. A. Galvin, Musician of Co. C, has been made 2d 
Principal Musician (he's a drummer). 

Assistant Surgeon F. B. Kimball reported for duty on the 26th 
(from civil life) . 



294 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[June '6S. 



Capt. Wilbur's case, hanging fire so long, has at last been 
settled by the receipt of the War Department Order, containing the 
approval of the President, and he will soon go home in disgrace. 

Lieut. Smith has resigned, because he was " jumped." He had 
to send in his little missive twice ere it was accepted. 

A B C D E F G H I K Totals. 

Sergeants 5555553 35 4 

Corporals 8888 8 8758 8 

Detached 8 3 4 3 3 5 5 49 

Absent in arrest ...1101002100 

Prisoners of Avar ... 2 10 12 

Officers detached ... 1 1 1 3 




:x 



JULY, 1863. 




WMlS^\ HE writer enters upon this memorable |^month with some 
misgivings as to whether he will be able to weave to- 
gether the various happenings in such a manner as to 
be entirely satisfactory to the reader. Lest he shall 
repeat himself {i.e., relate certain matters twice), he 
begs the regulation number of pardons in advance for so 
doing. Events came thick and fast at that time, and the 
main difficulty the writer has to contend with is to make a 
continuous story. However, he will plunge into the whirlpool of 
events, though he may take a " header" in so doing. 

Davis of A, who died 30 June, was buried the 1st, the first 
since Casey of C, on Folly Island. Several of our sick were sent 
same day to Hilton Head, to the General Hospital. For several 
days we had been sending details of men to Hilton Head to assist in 
loading and unloading stores of various kinds. The details were so 
large on the 2d, that on review we only presented 98 front. The 
same day Lieut. Flanders was discharged for disability, and Lieut. 
Libby, Jr., got a 20 days' leave. 

The expected order reached us about dark on the 3d. We 
were directed to leave nearly everything at St. Helena, and proceed 
in light marching order to the point of destination. The morrow 
would be the "Fourth," and we were apparently getting ready to 
celebrate it. But how, and where? During the night of the 3d, 
and before daylight of the 4th, we embarked on the steamer Boston. 
This was our fourth embarkation with Charleston as the objective 
point. On the steamer with us was Brayton's Battery and 60 horses. 
The glorious Fourth dawned upon us, a warm but beautiful day. 
The harbor presented a scene of activity. Many Hags were flying, 
and much steam was up as the laden transports, etc., awaited the 
signal to leave. Our steamer got away about noon and went direct 
to Folly Island. A little preparation had been made before our em- 
barkation to celebrate the Fourth ; but it remained for the sick and 
others left behind to carry out the programme. We heard afterward 
that they did so carry it out ; but the celebration for a whole regi- 
ment, when participated in by n hundred or so, was too mwohper cajnta, 
and with the usual result. For charity's sake we make no comment 

(295) 



296 THIRD NEW HAMPSHLRE KEGIMEXT. IJuhj '63. 

at this time. lu the hurry of embarking, Capt. Ayer, Lieut. Kirwin 
and twelve men were acciclently left behind. They rejoined us at 
Folly by first conveyance. As a final act before leaving the harbor, 
we took on board, at Hilton Head, Gen. Seymour. 

Another matter worth relating as of that date, was the sailing 
of the Arago for New York, but without any mail. Gen. Gillmore 
having deemed it prudent to have no mail go North at that particular 
time, for obvious reasons. We landed at the lower (southerly) end 
of Folly Island about dark and marched about four miles and 
bivouacked till morning. The Sixth Connecticut was near us. The 
spot was a rough one, we being apparently on a ridge and among 
scrub pines, underbrush and wood-ticks. The latter have already 
been mentioned. 

The morning sun of the 5th opened to our vision a view of the 
blockading fleet. We moved our quarters that morning to the side 
of the island facing the sea and near the beach,- and we worked hard 
to fix up our new camping ground. 

By the 6th we had got fairly well settled. Gen. Strong, the 
Forty-eighth New York, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Ninth Maine, 
and the "Lost Babes," arrived on the island. Dahlgren relieved 
DuPont that day. The crisis appeared nearer and nearer every 
moment. Each bit of information, as it arrived, added new interest 
and intensified the excitement. Had orders on the 7th for three 
days' rations to be kept constantly on hand, and that day we fur- 
nished a picket. Had our first dress parade on Folly that day, on 
the beach. We looked ourselves over and declared we never looked 
finer nor felt better. As if to exhilarate us, the Colonel told the 
otficers, on parade, that "we move tomorrow night." When this 
became known to the men a few minutes later, what a thrill went 
through the regiment ! 'T was like a train of powder lit only at one 
end and traversing the whole line almost as quickl}^ as the fact can 
be written. 

Right here is a phase the writer thinks he has not heretofore 
mentioned. At such times, the number of letters written was almost 
marvelous. There was a desire — an inordinate but perfectly ex- 
cusable desire — to let our friends at home know " the very latest." 

And still another phase. At such times, when the battle was 
imminent, many a man has said to his tent-mate : " Bill, if anything 
happens to me" (he hardly dared trust himself to say " if I am 

killed") "write to my mother at and tell her all about it. 

And send this little package which you will find in my knapsack, to 

, my dearest friend." This is only a sample message ; but they 

were more numerous and varied than has ever been or can be written. 
The beach before us was a splendid one, and we used it for drills 
and parades. Bathing was indulged in largely, and with beneficial 
results. The pickets previously spoken of reported that they were 
stationed in sight of a rebel camp. Mail. 

On the 8th there was a general movement of gunboats, monitors, 
troops, etc., from Hilton Head toward Charleston. A diary written 
by one at Hilton Head that day said: "Gen. Gillmore left here 



JnJij '(?.9.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 2'.)7 

tonight on the Gen. MeUjs. I think the ball will open tomorrow, 
at daylight. We have got batteries up under their noses, and they 
don't know it. All we've got to do is to shovel away the dirt and 
there we are ! " 

Inasmuch as there were so many items of interest, beginning 
with tlie <sth, the writer feels impelled to resort to the general form 
of a diary, but covering only the time to include the evacuation of 
Wagner (7 Sept. 1863). 

July 8 : Gen. Beauregard says a noise was heard that night 
from the lower end of Morris Island, apparently the chopping of 
wood with axes, on Folly. The Third New Hampshire had in line 
about 450 to start that night. A diary says: "The order in line 
tonig^ht in the boats is : Sixth. Connecticut, Seventh Connecticut, Third 
New Hampshire, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Ninth Maine, Forty- 
eighth New York." 



FOLLY ISLAND. 



The rebels had driven piling in the creek on the westerly or 
inner side of the island. These must be removed. Col. Serrell 
about the 1st of July drilled two boat crews in Skull Creek, near 
Seabrook, with saws for cutting off piling under water. About the 
7th, pontoons and various intrenching and other tools and materials 
were shipped at Hilton Head for Folly, arriving there before noon 
the next day. Gen. Gillmore arrived at same time and probabl}^ upon 
the same steamer, the Mary Benton. That night the piling referred 
to was sawed off eight feet below low water, the work on each con- 
suming about seven to ten minutes. All work on Folly was either 
done in the night or in obscure places by daj'. The planting of the 
guns at the northerly end was within speaking distance of the rebel 
picket. The arrangements for the attack was for the assault to 
begin at daybreak on the 9th ; but about midnight of the 8th, it was 
decided to postpone till the morning of the 10th. 

It is said that Gen. Yogdes, upon occupying the island, began 
to fortify at the southerly end and casually asked Gen. Gillraore's 
opinion. Gen. Gillmore, with his characteristic smile of apparent 
approval, said something like this: "It would meet my approval if 
the island were on a pivot." 

A letter of July Gth gives the troops on Folly thus : Thirty- 
ninth Illinois, Sixty-second Ohio, Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, Fighty- 
fifth Pennsylvania, Forty-eighth New York, One Hundredth New 
York, Third New Hampshire, Fourth New Hampshire, Seventh New 
Hampshire, Sixth Connecticut, Seventh Connecticut, Ninth Maine, 
Light Co. E, Third U. S. Artillery (Hamilton's Battery), Light Co. 
E, Third Rhode Island Artillery and others. 

No transport was permitted to approach the island during the 
day, no gun to be discharged, and exchanges between pickets were 
strictly forbidden. On the afternoon of the 8th, Gen. Terry with 
about 4,000 troops moved up the Stono, landing at lower end of 
James Island, suceeding, as was intended, in drawing troops and 
attention from Morris Island. 



298 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJnln '63. 

MORRIS ISLAND. 

This island was a narrow, outlying sand beach, about 3^ miles 
long, of irregular width and not exceeding 800 or 400 yards wide at 
its widest part, and in many places not half that width. The beach 
was completely insulated seaward by the main ship channel, and 
westward by an impassable morass extending landward, say 3,-500 
yards, terminating with the firm land of James Island. The north 
end — Cumming's Point — is the left angle of the entrance to the 
harbor of Charleston. Wagner was three-fourths of a mile from the 
north end, and stretched across the island. From Wagner south the 
beach was nearly level for 1^ miles ; then arose a succession of sand 
hills, where the rebels had placed guns to defend the approaches by 
the Inlet. Sumter was nearly northwest of the north end of Morris 
and about 1,300 yards from it. 

LIGHT-HOUSE INLET. 

Brig. -Gen. Turner said of it, that the place of landing for our 
artillery — and indeed all of our supplies — was at the south end of 
Morris Island, in Light-House Inlet, a narrow, confined stream, ap- 
proached from the sea only through a crooked, narrow channel and 
over a bar, admitting at high water vessels of only 8 or 10 feet draft. 
Nearly one-half of the time there was no ingress or egress to the in- 
let, and much valuable time was lost in waiting for high water on 
which to fioat our transports over the bar. 



MORRIS AND FOLLY ISLANDS. 

The Comte de Paris says Beauregard warned his government as 
early as 25 June that the Federals were threatening Morris Island, 
and asked for more troops. He had at that time about -SOO or 900 
men on Morris. Beauregard, in writing fifteen months later, said 
the preparations on Folly by the Federals were all made within two 
days of the attack. [How mistaken he was ! — D. E.] The Comte 
de Paris says, further, that Terry's division, 4,000 strong, and Vogdes' 
and Strong's brigades (the latter 2,500 strong), including the Fifty- 
fourth Massachusetts (colored) were on Folly awaiting the attack. 
[He is mistaken as to the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts.] Col. 
Graham, commanding on Morris, upon being attacked, put his whole 
force at work on the defensive, viz. : 11 pieces of large calibre, 350 
artillery men and 350 infantry. Of Graham's retreat he says, a 
tardy reinforcement of about a hundred men came to cover him, 
and the retreat ceased at the glacis of Wagner. He lost 294, nearly 
half his force. He says further that the success of the attack was 
largely due to Terry, who made a successful diversion on James 
Island, drawing troops from Graham. 



GILLMORE'S FIRST ORDER FOR ASSAULT. 

Confidential instructions bearing date 8 July 1863, were as 
follows : — 

An attack upon Morris Island Avill be made at the rising of the moon 
tonight, by Brig. -Gen. Strong's brigade, of Brig. -Gen. Seymonr's division. 



Jnlii '63r\ 



THIRD NEW IIAMrSHIRE REGIMENT. 



299 



This force will be embarked in small boats immediately after sunset, and 
will pass through Folly Island Creek to and across Light-House Inlet. A 
small detachment from this force Avill enter the creek to the west of Mor- 
ris Island, and will land just north of the old lighthouse, seize the batteries 
there, and if possible turn 
them upon the enemy's 
encampment north of 
them. The main column 
will land from Light- 
House Inlet, carry the 
batteries on the south end 
of Morris Island, and 
advance to the support of 
the detachment above 
mentioned. Two regi- 
ments and some field ar- 
tillery will be held in 
readiness on the extreme 
north end of Folly Island, 
to be pushed over as re- 
inforcements. To this 
end, Gen. Strong will 
send his boats back as 
soon as he has disem- 
barked his command. 

2. At the same time. 
Gen. Terry, with all his 
division except the One 
Hundredth Ncav York 
Volunteers, will ascend 
the Stono under convoy 
of the navy, and make a 
strong demonstration on 
James Island, but will 
not unnecessarily hazard 
any portion of his com- 
mand. Perhaps one or 
two regiments only need 
be disembarked. These 
should be pushed forward 
as skirmishers, under cov- 
er of the navy. 

3. A naval force is expected to enter the main channel abreast of 
Morris Island, by or before sunrise tomorrow morning, to co-operate with 
the land forces. 

4. Should the night attack fail from any cause, the assaulting column 
will Avithdraw to Folly Island, sending their boats to Folly Island Creek. 
In that event the batteries at the north end of Folly Island Avill open at day- 
break or as soon thereafter as practicable. Brig. -Gen. Seymour will arrange 
all the details . 

FOLLY ISLAND BATTERIES. 

3-inch Field Rifles. 
20-pounder Siege Parrotts. 
30-pouuder Parrotts. 
10-inch Siege Mortars. 
3-inch Field Rifles. 
10-pounder Field Parrotts. 
30-pounder Parrotts. 
10-inch Siege Mortars. 
3-inch Wiard Field Rifles. 
8-inch Siege Mortars. 
The letters refer to the pla 




A . . 


. . 2 


B . . 


. . 4 


C . . 


. . -1 


D . . 


. . (5 


E . . 


. .2 


F . . 


. . G 


G . . 


. . 8 


H . . 


. . 4 


I . . 


. . 6 


J . . 


5 



300 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. lJ^a^| '63. 

These guns were all located at the north end of Folly, and were 
mounted under the direction of Brig. -Gen. Israel Yogdes, being 
completed and read}^ for action 6th Julj^. These batteries were : 

1. To operate against and if possible to dismount the enemy's guns. 

2. To cover the landing of the troops, o. To protect possible retreat. 

GILLMORE'S ORDER FOR ASSAULT OF 10 JULY. 

Confidential instructions, issued 9 July, were as follows : — 

1. The attack on Morris Island, ordered for this morning, but post- 
poned in consequence of the inclemency of the weather and other unfavora- 
ble circumstances, will take place tomorrow morning at break of day, by 
opening our batteries at the north end of Folly Island. Gen. Strong's bri- 
gade, or so much of it as the small boats can accommodate, will embark to- 
night and hold itself in Folly Island Creek, ready to move forward and at 
the proper time occupy the south end of Morris Tslai^d. 

4. Lieut. -Commander Francis W. Bunce, U. S. Navy, with four navy 
howitzer launches, will approach Light-House Inlet at daybreak by way of 
Folly Island Creek, and engage the enemy's rifle-pits and batteries on Morris 
Island in flank and reverse, choosing his own position. He will cover Gen. 
Strong's landing. 

?>. Two regiments of infantry, a battery of light artillery and five 
Requa rifled batteries will be held in readiness to reinforce Gen. Strong 
promptly. Brig. -Gen. Seymour will arrange and order all details. 

TAKING OF MORRIS ISLAND. 

On the 8th an order was received to embark in small boats, 
immediately after dark. During the afternoon a lot of cotton cloth 
was received at Headquarters for distribution. Each man was to 
have a piece three inches wide tied around his left arm above the 
elbow. This was to enable us to know each other and avoid mistakes 
should we chance to fight the enemy by night. This cloth was taken 
from a blockade runner (the lluhn) , run ashore near Light-House 
Inlet and in sight of our camp. Embarked and proceeded a short 
distance only, when we were halted ; and we waited at that point 
till nearly daybreak of the 9th for orders. This was very tedious, 
as there was no opportunity to lie down and hardly to stand with 
ease. Orders came at length to return to camp and hold ourselves in 
readiness to embark again. The duty of the night was harder than 
marching, for it gave us cramps, and the dampness of the marshes 
gave to nearly every man a severe cold. Late in the afternoon we 
received orders to re-embark at same time and place as before. 
The Third New Hampshii-e had about 410 men all told. Afternoon 
showery — rainbow, a good omen. 

It was nearly midnight when all was in readiness to proceed on 
the expedition. Gen. Strong led off with four launches, from the 
Pawnee. We moved slowly through the circuitous windings of the 
creek till about three o'clock (10th) when we suddenly came to a 
halt in consequence of piles driven in the creek to obstruct it. Our 
Engineers soon sawed them off and we passed through. Nothing 
could now be heard save the dip of our oars, and the extreme quiet 
was absolutely painful. We knew not our precise locality, and 
momentarily expected a surprise or possibly worse. By daybreak 



Jnhj 'e.V.J 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



301 



we arrived in sight of Morris Island. A halt was made and we 
rowed our boats close under the bank, and by so doing were almost 
wholly hidden from sight by the tall marsh grass. We could then 
see the batteries on Morris Island and the rebel sentinels walking 
their beats as though no enemy was near. The old light-house was 
used as a lookout; but the sleepy sentinels apparently did not see us. 
Our batteries (fully described elsewhere), which were on the 
upper end of Folly Island and on our right, were^ quickly cleared 
away by the use of many axes and shovels, in willing hands. A 
solitarj' gun belched forth and sent its iron messenger across the inlet 
to the camp of the sleepy rebels, giving them a realizing sense that 
an enemy was near. The solitaty gun was the signal for our gun- 
boats, outside the bar, to draw near and participate. A few minutes 
of silence ensued, during which the rebels could be seen hurrying to 
and fro in great haste. Several boat howitzers which accompanied 
us were soon landed. A few minutes later, and the monitors outside 
and boat howitzers inside opened upon the doomed batteries of Mor- 
ris Island. The Folly Island batteries soon joined, opening a heavy 




j^T LIOHTHOUSE \lii^y 



,,«d^«^^;^"T; 



JUiy 





tWi 






SUPIiEMELY QUIET. 



SHCHTLY OlSTURgEO. 

z 



CON5I0EM61Y /«LAKMED. 

3 



and rapid fire. The rebels were quiet but a few minutes ere they re- 
turned our fire with zeal, sending their compliments mostly across to 
Folly. Our boat howitzers at that moment chanced to drop a shell 
in the enemy's midst, which caused a sudden outburst of enthusiasm 
from the (our) force in the boats, which up to this time had remained 
unnoticed so far as being fired at. We then received special notice, 
and their whizzing shot and bursting shell were hurled into our midst. 
It was deemed best to change our position, and we rowed out into 
full view. As there were several regiments, we made quite a dis- 
play ; and we received shot and shell correspondingly. A solid shot 
cut a boat in two, killing one man and wounding several. Gen. 
Strong was with us (t. e., the force) . Soon his voice was heard above 
the din of battle, calling to the officers who had charge of the boat 
howitzers, "Level your pieces on the lookout! " and every howitzer 
sent a shell at the place designated. Some went directly through it, 



302 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



{Jtihl '63. 



and others fell arouud it, near or distant according to the skill of the 
gunners. The scene was very exciting. The boats were necessarily 
kept in motion, as the tide and a light breeze tended to drive them 
on shore, where we would have been mere targets. Soon the order 
to land was given by Gen. Strong, and each boat load seemed de- 
sirous of being on shore first. We jumped as soon as the boats 
grounded, whether the water was one or four feet deep ; and in con- 
sequence many got wet to their waists. The excitement was very 
high at this time ; and we could see the rebels on their way down to 
their rifle pits, near by and directly in our front on the low ground. 
Then a race took place to see who should first occupy the pits. p]ach 
side succeeded in gaining a part. Then followed a sharp infantry 
fire, which being only an accompaniment to the heavy artillery, made 
the noise almost deafening. The Third New Hampshire occupied a 




kV OF SIEGE OF CHARLESTON. 



position bordering on a mud hole, deep and black. Some of our 
men got into it, sinking to their arm pits, spoiling their ammunition 
and requiring assistance to extricate themselves. A charge was or- 
dered ; and on we went over pit and hole, through water and sand and 
mud, shouting as we ran and firing as we neared the panic-stricken 
rebels, who fied with terror to their works, and beyond (except the 
killed, wounded and prisoners), until they reached the friendly cover 
of Wagner. As we reached the sand bluffs and found ourselves mas- 
ters of the situation, our joy can be imagined but not described. 
The shouts of victory that ascended that morning of the 10th of July, 
1863, were such as that spot would never hear again, and such as we 



July '63.'] THIED NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 303 

who participated will never forget. A few prisoners were taken, but 
principally the sick and those too much infested with the Union spirit 
to run at the approach of the Federals. As we were endangered by 
the fire of our gunboats, they were signalled to cease firing. 

The prisoners were temporarily placed in charge of Maj. (Pay- 
master) Stryker of Gen. Gillmore's Staff. Capt. J. Ravinal Macbeth 
made an indirect but ineffectual attempt to escape. Lieut. John S. 
Bee (rebel) was wounded nine times (captured) . The prisoners were 
removed at once to Folly, where they were "corralled" for several 
days. 

The bluffs upon which the rebel batteries were planted varied in 
height from thirty to fifty feet, and the guns Avere placed at con- 
venient points, without regularity. We followed the retreating rebels 
along the beach, but were soon reminded by AVagner that the retreat 
was fully covered. 

The superior speed of the fl^'ing rebels soon brought them to 
Fort Wagner, which opened fire on us with solid shot, and they 
came bounding and trundling along the beach, some passing directly 
through the regiment, which opened right and left with a deal of re- 
spect, but with a greater degree of alacrity. Others bounded com- 
pletely over us and into the sea. 

We marched a little beyond the bluffs, when we observed a man 
running towards us from the rebel direction and beckoning to us, and 
then halting and repeating. The man was so much excited we 
thought possibly the enemy was near. He proved to be a deserter 
from the rebels. Their most northerly gun was turned upon the 
rebels by our gunners ; but whether the shots reached them before 
they arrived at Wagner, is uncertain. We marched up the beach 
about half a mile and halted. 

A\^e were then instructed to lie down, and protect ourselves as 
best we could. The spot chosen was a little elevated, perhaps three 
feet, and probably caused by storms or heavy winds, or both. As 
we lay, we were invisible from Wagner, but were recipients of Wag- 
ner's iron compliments at too frequent intervals. We laid there and 
thus during the rest of the day, suffering not only from the heat of 
the sun, but there were a few killed and several wounded. 

After darkness had fairly settled over us (for which we were 
truly thankful), we were permitted to stand and move about some. 
We were soon ordered forward, say half a mile, and there halted, 
being told when near daybreak that the fort was to be attacked and 
we were to support the attacking party. 

Following is a list of the guns captured 10 July : — 

A. 1 8-inch Navy Shefl Gun. 

B. 18" Sea Coast Howitzer. 

C. 13" Whitworth Siege Carriage. 
]). 3 10 " Sea Coast Mortars. 

E. 1 30-pounder Parrott (Navv) Siege Carriage. 

F. 1 Broolvs Rifle (siege). 

G. 1 8-inch Navy Gun. 
H. 1 8 " Navy Guu. 

I. 18 " Sea Coast Howitzer. 
The letters refer to a plan showing the locations of the several guns. 



304 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [JkIu'GS. 

The Charleston Daily Courier ot the 10th -had two proelamatious 
by the Mayor : One, requesting the removal of women and children ; 
the other, calling upon the citizens to suspend business till the safety 
of the city was assured. The paper also contained a signal dispatch 
to Gen. Ripley — received by hina !) July, at 11.10 a.m. — from 
Morris Island, to the effect that heavj' works had been unmasked on 
the night of the 8th on J'olly Island, and the enemy was being 
strongly reinforced and had his barges in the creek tied to piling. 



July 10th: Of the capture of the 10th, Gen. Beauregard says: 
"The eneni}' thus gained possession of the lower end of Morris 
Island by rapidly throwing a large number of troops across the inlet, 
which it was impossible for the available infantry on the spot — 
about 400 effective men — to resist. It was not the erection of works 
on Little Folly Island that caused the abandonment of our position. 
It was clearly the want on our side of infantry support, and the 
enemy's superior weight and number of guns, and the heavy support- 
ing brigade of infantry that swept away our feeble and stinted 
means of resistance." He expresses his belief that the guns on Folly 
were planted within 48 hours of the attack. [He was mistaken. — 
D. E.] He further says that during the fight two companies of the 
Seventh South Carolina Battalion arrived, but could not make head 
against the overwhelming numbers of the enemy. 

A diary of the 10th says, as we marched up the beach (after 
taking the batteries), a shot from Sumter or Wagner killed J. J. 
Locke of B. Among others wounded during the day while we lay 
behind the sand ridges (the}^ were not hills) were mentioned, Ira P. 
George, Samuel W. Abbott, W. S. Dearborn, Elisha M. Kempton, 
of Co. B; G. W. Youngman, of Co. I; Wilson killed. Brown and 
Entwistle wounded, all of D. 

As we entered the camp of the rebels many of our men exchanged 
muskets, they having left good (newer) ones of same pattern as ours 
(Enfield) . A diary says : "Whole number killed and wounded, 340." 
That refers probably to the whole command {i. e., the attacking force) . 
The Third New Hampshire loss was given by the same writer as 
" 8 killed and 22 wounded." 

Gen. Strong's plan was to land at Oyster Point with two regi- 
ments and then work towards the sea and the batteries on the bluffs. 
This was carried out very nearly. One account says : "100 prisoners 
captured, mostly by the Sixth Connecticut," which was ahead of the 
Third New Hampshire. 

The monitors Nahant, CatsMll, Montav.k and Weehawken^ under 
Dahlgren, on the CatskiU, went in over the bar very early and assisted 
materially in the fight, paying particular attention to the batteries on 
the bluff. They fired 534 shots. The CatskiU was struck GO times, 
the Naliant 6 times, 3fontauk 2 times, and the Weehaivken not at all. 

The One Hundredth New York Historian says, as soon as Strong's 
brigade had landed on Morris Island, the boats were sent back to 
Folly Island and took over to Morris the One Hundredth New York, 



Jiihj '65.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 305 

Seventh New Hampshire, six companies of Fort}'- eighth New York : 
and that force joined the advance near the Beacon house. He further 
said the flag of the Sixth Connecticut was placed on the Beacon house, 
but was soon shot down and then replaced by the flag of another i"egi- 
ment. He says further, that the batteries on Folly were transferred 
to Morris within five days after capture of Morris. 

Sergt. Hitchcock of Co. I got a bullet through the rim of his 
hat (not painful) . 

The Confederates stated then- loss at 294 killed and wounded, 
including 1(1 otfieers, and that the Federal loss was 15 killed and 92 
wounded. [It must be understood that these figures are given for 
what they are worth and not as absolutely correct. — D. E.] 

It will be seen that one wing of the Forty-eighth New York 
(under Col. Barton) was on Folly during the capture of Morris. It 
was supporting the Folly Island batteries. 

Beauregard says his whole force that da^^ was as follows : James 
Island, 2,906; Morris Island, 927; Sullivan's Island, 1,158; 
Charleston, 850: total, in first division, 5,841. 

In the early morning fight, two of our boats (laden with infantry') 
were sunk. 

The Chaplain's diary says: " Tliird New Hampshire loss was 
4 killed and 2() wounded." 

The launches of the Paumee, having the boat howitzers on board, 
were commanded by Lieut. -Comdr. Bunce and Lieut. Mackenzie of 
the navy. 

A flag captured by the Sixth Connecticut on the lOtli had on it, 
"Pocotaligo, 22 Oct. 1862." 

The Tenth Connecticut and First Connecticut Light Battery 
were landed on James Island early in the morning, to draw rebel 
forces from Morris Island. 

A sailor from a navy launch got ashore and captured a stray 
mule. He loudly proclaimed it was the first craft he ever commanded 
and that he had a right to ride on the quarter deck. 

As we Avere marching toward Wagner a deserter joined us who 
betrayed his nativity thus: "O'ive sarved the Confidricy as long as 
I loike." 

A Confederate account says : ' ' The Federals landed at Oyster 
Point and also in front of the batteries. Our artillery and infantry 
was under command of Col. Graham, Twenty-first South Carolina." 

The Xeiv York Herald of the 19th July gives the losses of the 
10th thus: — 

Killed. Woiuuled. 

Seventh Connecticut 7 

Third New Hampshire 8 21 

• Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania 11 

Seventh New Hampshire 3 

Sixth Connecticut 1 11 

Forty-eighth New York 4 23 

Sixty-second Ohio 1 

Ninth Maine (missing, 1) 2 14 

Totals 15 91 



306 THIRD XEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [July '63. 

MORRIS ISLAND ITEMS. 

The Xew York Herald of 19 July thus places the forces of 
Strong's brigade : — 

Seventh Connecticut Lieut. -Col. D. C. Rodman. 

(Cos. A, B. I and K only.) 

Sixth Connecticut " . . Col. John L. Chatflelil. 

Third New Hampshire Col. .John H. Jackson. 

Seventy-Sixth Pennsylvania . . . Col. D. C. Strawbridge. 

Ninth Maine Col. Sabine Emery. 

Forty-eighth New York Col. Wm. B. Barton. 

(A battalion only.) 

Oue of the captured was reported to have said: " Oi uaither 
want exchange nor parool ; but Oi want to go to Bostin." 

Gen. Ripley (Confederate, in report of 4th Dec. 1863) stated 
that the whole Confederate force on the island 10th July was about 
1,000: Twenty-first South Carolina, 600; First South Carolina Ar- 
tillery (2 companies), 200; 2 companies artillery at Wagner, 120; 
40 at Gregg ; a detachment of South Carolina Volunteers under Capt. 
Haskell ; and a small detachment of couriers. Col. R. T. Graham, 
Twentj'-first South Carolina Volunteers, in command at the Island ; 
Maj. McFee, commanding the infantry ; Lieut. -Col. J. A. Yates, com- 
manding the artillery ; two companies at South Battery uuder Capt. 
Mitchell. ^ 

Says Maj. .Johnson, South Carolina Artillery, in his book entitled 
"Defence of Charleston Harbor," issued in 1890 : — 

The descent on Morris Island was thus a successfully accomplished fact. 
The Union troops were occupying nearly three miles of the southern part, 
leaving the Confederates to hold one mile of the northern part, with two 
strong fortifications (Wagner and Gregg), but with their communications 
with the city seriously threatened and impaired. The defence .... was not 
so vigorous as it might have been, even allowing for the heavy odds against 
the Confederates. The fire of their eleven pieces, mostly of large calibre, did 
little or no execution. Some .... could not be depressed to bear on the 
landings. It would have been better had the gunners not Avearied themselves 
out fighting the Folly Island batteries, for two hours, but had reserved their 
fire to be concentrated on the boats as they advanced to laud the troops. 
Gen. Gillmore remarks in his report that a few Avell-placed field guns would 
have done better. Nor was any stubborn resistance made from the rifle pits 
by the small support of infantry, so overwhelmed was it by the batteries, the 
flanking fire from the monitors and the charge of four times its own number 
from the landing. The shattered and exhausted companies reached Fort 
Wagner in a very disordered condition, which lasted late into the night; 
and if an assault had been made that evening, the whole island might have 
fallen. The Union army certainly lost a great opportunity. About mid- 
night fresh troops Avere brought from Charleston, particularly the Geor- 
gians, and a more determined spirit prevailed at once. The repulse inflicted 
on the enemy the next morning (11th) served to encourage the defenders of 
Morris Island, and to confirm the purpose of the commanding general to 
hold it as long as possible. 

Gen. Ripley (Confederate) , in report of 4 Dec. 1863, said : " The 
attack was not a surprise. The enemy had made himself known as 

early as 24 May It was a surprise so far as the enemy got 

in readiness .... before we were ready to receive him .... the 



Jul;/ '63.^ THIRD XEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 307 

infantry to do this was ordered 8th July from different parts, and 
was expected to be in position on the night of the 9th, to the extent 
of 800 or 1,000 men. None arrived till morning of 10th. Nelson's 
Battalion (Seventh South Carolina) arrived at that time — about 250 
men, and was in time to do some service and assist in covering the 

retreat Four companies of Col. Graham's regiment were on 

picket guard near Oyster Point .... all the others rallied to their 
support when the attack was made I visited the island dur- 
ing the night of the 9th .... an officer was in waiting all night to 

conduct Nelson's men to position From reports received, I 

believe our battery to have been unsupported, except by their extra 
commissions, till late in the action, when two companies of Nelson's 

got up and rendered some support The enemy landed at two 

points . . . . " 

General Order 1 : 

Headquarters U. S. Forces, 

Morris Island, S. C, 10 July, ISGS. 
Pursuant to special orders of this date from Headquarters U. S. Forces, 
Folly Island, S. C, the undersigned assumes command of the troops upon 
tliat portion of Morris Island captured this day ])v the U. S. forces. 

Geo. C. Strong, 

Brig.-(Ten. Comrannding. 



Admiral Porter's book says : " At 4 a.m. the Catsli'U, Montauk, 
Xahnnt and Weehairlien crossed over the bar, the flag of Admiral 
Dahlgren on the Catskill. At o, Gillmore began his attack, and 
after three and one-quarter hours captured the lower end of Morris 
and pushed up to within 600 yards of Wagner. The iron-clads lay 
parallel with Morris and assisted in the first assault. The four iron- 
clads fired oo-i shells and shrapnel. The CatakiU was struck 60 
times, the NaUant 6 times, the Jlontauk twice, and the WeeJiairken 
was not hit at all. 

The attack on the 11th took place as arranged ; but was unsuc- 
cessful, for a variety of reasons, none of which reflected upon the 
support. The troops all fell back to their former positions of the 
day before, with the same accompaniment of hot sun, hot sand, hot 
shot and hot shell. 

The rebels seemed to fire at us as a mere pastime, the big, solid 
shot bowling along, through and over the sand ridges, and carrying 
consternation and perhaps leaving death or mangled limbs to mark 
its course. 

At night our regiment furnished a fatigue detail, and the writer 
went in charge of his company's quota. The march — silent as the 
grave — was to the front, and for a considerable distance — so it 
seemed to us. Arms were then stacked, and each took a shovel : 
a battery was to be built. During the night some men went out fur- 
ther to the front, and returned with a lot of 2-inch oak plank, some 
pieces 30 to 40 feet long and requiring five men to handle them. 
No sound was heard save of the shovels as they were forced into the 



308 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. iJuJij '63. 

sand ; and it seemed almost like a dream, to see at intervals of a few 
moments only five or six men march silently in with a plank, deposit 
it, and stalk silently away for more. At this time a kitten came to 
the writer ; and after petting it a few minutes, this oasis in the great 
desert was allowed to go back to whence it came. Before the morn- 
ino- the detail had returned to the regiment. 



THE FIRST ATTACK ON WAGNER. 

An account of the affair (11 July 1863, morning), from a Con- 
federate soui'ce, is as follows: The garrison comprised — in the 
salient, the Eighteenth Georgia Battalion ; the Twelfth Georgia Bat- 
talion on its right, the First Georgia on its left (the sea face). The 
guns were all manned by the South Carolina Artillery, and the right 
and center of the fort were held by South Carolina Infantry. Capt. 
C. Werner, German Volunteers, was Officer of the Night and was 
killed early in the action. One Yankee who stood alone on the para- 
pet, in front of a 32-pounder, was called to, to come in ; but his re- 
ply was by bringing his piece to his shoulder, and a bullet whizzed 
past the head of the commanding officer. The next moment he was 
blown to atoms. A part of the garrison was the same as at Fort 
Pulaski when it was captured ; and Col. Olmstead, their then com- 
mander [the narrator of these facts], was still with them. The 
Seventh Connecticut, who early occupied Fort Pulaski, was of the 
stormiug party this morning, and several of them were taken prison- 
ers. Each recognized the other. The tables were completely turned. 



Torpedoes were placed in front of Wagner on the 10th of July, 
and Private Dounolly (an Irishman), of Co. G, First Georgia, was 
placed as guard to keep the Confederates from wandering over them. 
It is said that Gen. Ripley unwittingly approached quite near, and 
the guard came near shooting him, as he said, "to keep him from 
being blown up by saltpaders." 

The Comte de Paris says the heads of the columns reached the 
top of the parapet ; but the remainder, crowding into the narrow 
space which it was necessary to go over to reach the fort, was soon 
in disorder, and in its retreat it dragged away the first assailants. 
The Confederates buried, he says, 97 Federals and took 119 prison- 
ers, some 40 of whom were wounded. The Confederate loss he re- 
ports at 12 men wounded. 

11 July: A diary says concerning attack on Wagner, that the 
Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania was in the advance, and their loss was 
206 killed, wounded and missing. The Third New Hampshire was in 
the rear of the Ninth Maine. The Sixth and Seventh Connecticut were 
really in the advance, followed by the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, 
Seventh New Hampshire and Ninth Maiue. The Third New Hamp- 
shire aud Ninth Maine were the reserve. After daylight the moni- 
tors moved up and shelled Wagner for about four hours. Capt. Dil- 
ler of the Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania asserts that his regiment had 
fasted for the 30 hours previous to the assault. 



Julij '63.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 309 

The Wabash left Hilton Head today. 

The Engineers attempted to bridge the Inlet that day, but aban- 
doned the attempt after building nearly a hundred feet. 

We lay behind the sand ridges all day, being under the fire of 
Wagner and Sumter. The Chaplain assisted in bur^'ing the dead of 
the 10th, both Federals and Confederates. 

The Historian of the Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania sa^^s the 
Third New Hampshire loss was 1 killed and 1 wounded on the morn- 
ing of the 11th. If correct, it must have been from stray shots, as 
our regiment did not participate and did not get very near Wagner. 

A Confederate account says: "During last night (10th) Wag- 
ner was reinforced by 550 Georgians under Col. Olmstead, late of 
Fort Pulaski, and a South Carolina battalion under Lieut. -Col. Nel- 
son. Our loss was 1 oflicer and 5 privates wounded. The Federal 
loss was stated at 2 officers and 1 00 men died on the field, and 6 offi- 
cers and 113 men captured." 

12 July : We were still in the sand. Already we saw evidences 
of Gillraore's intention to stay. A fatigue detail of 200 from our 
regiment. Still under fire and several were wounded (a diary says 
G). At night we assisted in throwing up earthworks, quite well ad- 
vanced to the front. Hamilton's Batterj' (artillery) succeeded in 
disabling a rebel steamer. Beauregard says he got a part of Cling- 
man's Brigade that day as reinforcement. The firing was more severe 
than on the previous day. 

Col. Serrell of the Engineers saj^s he moved up the entire En- 
gineer force then present (428 men) near the old rebel hospital in 
front, and at 8 in the evening begun the work afterward known as 
the First Parallel (see Parallels). He worked 3 companies of Engi- 
neers and 200 men of Col. Jackson's Third New Hampshire Regi- 
ment all night, under fire of the enemy. Mail. 

13 July: A diary at Hilton Head (Band Master Ingalls) says : 
"160 wounded came here today, one- third of them Secesh. Played 
in front of hospital [General Hospital] . Among the pieces, ' Yankee 

Doodle.' A Secesh sent me word that it was played well, but d d 

near played out." 

We had the long roll at daybreak. At night, Capt. Payne of the 
One Hundredth New York (a scout) succeeded in firing the disabled 
rebel steamer (see 12th) , and it was burned to the water's edge. The 
Engineers were again at work on the bridge, but decided to make a 
wharf of it. 

The rebel Gen. Wm. B. Taliaferro (pronounced Tolliver) assumed 
command of Morris Island (;'. e., his part) the 13th. He was an old 
Mexican War officer, and served with our own Col. Jackson. These 
facts were, however, unknown to them ; and it was long after the war 
that each first knew of the proximity of the other. 

The regiment went on fatigue at night, though not for all night. 
The shelling from Wagner and Sumter continued all day, though not 
so frequent as on the 12th. 

A Confederate conference, held the loth at Charleston, is treated 
elsewhere. 



310 THIRD XEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. \_Julir6S. 

We pause here to insert the first item about drafting at the 
North. The draft begun in New York City the 18th; and ere the 
officers had fairly got to work a riot ensued, of fearful dimensions, 
continuing two or three days, with great loss of life and property. 

14 July: We were called out (into line) at daybreak; but the 
alarm was a needless one. We had been provided with shovels ; and 
after selecting a spot about half a mile further back, we proceeded 
to layout camp again. The spot was behind a considerable sand- 
ridge, which partially protected us. Our tents and blankets had not 
yet arrived from Folly, where we left them on the night of the 9th. 
We had only our rubber blankets ; and these, with our haversacks, 
were brought to us the loth from the boats, where we left them on 
the morning of the 10th. We had been continually on duty for 
about five days, and felt a great sense of relief at being sent back 
to establish a home. 

The Chaplain went to Folly the 14th after Dr. Buzzell, whom 
we left there in charge of the sick and others unable to move with 
the regiment on the 9th. Chaplain Hill's diary says: "Our men 
have not had the care they should : not one night's rest since we left 
Folly." 

The work of fortifying was going on rapidly. A Confederate ac- 
count says : " Tonight a party was sent out from Wagner for a sor- 
tie, consisting of 150 men under Maj. Eiou of Nelson's battalion." 

15 July: Lieut. Wadlia was detailed for duty in the Ordnance 
Department (see Swamp Angel and his Personal). In our new lo- 
cation we were out of range and could rest a little ; for we had been 
five days and nights, substantially, under fire. Material for sieging 
was being landed and mounted. It looked as if we were to proceed 
that way, little by little ; holding on to each linear foot and reaching 
out for another. We had a detail at work on the wharf the 15th, 
unloading guns and ammunition. The Ironsides came in over the 
bar. We can never forget the Ironsides. Sumter remained silent 
during the entire day, but the James Island batteries opened. Gen, 
Gillmore ordered that his troops be encamped by brigades. 



General Order No. 4, \ Department of the South. 

Spcond Scries. J Headquarters in the Field, 

Morris Island, 15 July 1863. 

The forces on Morris will be immediately encamped into brigades, and 
brigade commanders will give special attention that sinks are dug and a 
thorough police of camps be made daily. 

Regimental, battalion and detached commanders will immediately re- 
port by name every officer and man absent from his command, and by what 
authority and where ; and if absent without authority, to be reported next 
morning as deserter unless known to be a prisoner of war. Note carefully 
all absences, so that it maybe stopped against pay, if without leave. Guard 
mount, parades and roll calls to be strictly observed except by troops on 
duty at immediate front. The Commanding General Avill hold every divi- 
sion, brigade and regimental or company commander to a strict observ- 
ance of the above, and whosoever fails to carry it out will be at once relieved 
and sent to rear. 

This order, except first paragraph, app'ics to whole command operat- 
ing on Morris, Folly and James Islands. 
Edw. W. Smith, Q. A. Gillmore, 

Assistant Adjutant-General. Brig.-Gen. Commnndimj. 



Juhj'6S.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 311 

Four 200-pouuder Parrotts were unloaded the 15th, from the 
Dingo, and taken to the front to pepper the rebels. Wagner pos- 
sessed a Whitworth that sent a screeching shell the whole length of 
the island and make it lively for poor Yankee "Ave uns." 

16 July: We were worked hard on all sorts of details. Col- 
Jackson was Field Officer of the Day, and Capt. Clark was in conir 
mand of the regiment. Gen. Terry Avas attacked in force on James 
Island, near Secessionville (we were there 16 June LS62) , and the fight 
was a brisk one. As we could hear the battle, but diil not know its 
import, we were more or less exercised about it, not even knowing 
that it was not an advance on us in force, and of sufficient force to 
drive us all into the Atlantic. At night we were ordered to the ex- 
treme front -^ the outermost rifle pits — to support the Ninth Maine; 
but what to do we did not know. We " stood on our arms" (feet) 
all night, and in a rain. The night was as dark as well could be, and 
we saw each other by a touch of the elbow. The darkness and the 
danger were almost alike susceptible of being felt. That we had a 
drink that night, all around, is only a cold historical fact. It was 
announced during the day that wharves had been completed on both 
sides of Light-House Inlet and were ready for use. There was con- 
siderable shelling all day. The hard work and exposure and loss 
of sleep were having their effect, and man}' of our men were sick — 
practically worn out. 

The only remaining monitor at Hilton Head left that harbor toda^^ 



17 July: Tlie regiment returned to camp at daybreak. Two 
details for I'atigue, soon after, took nearly every available man, a 
part of them being kept out all night. When not at work or asleep, 
our men were fixing up the camp. We were located near the high 
bluffs where the captured rebel batteries were, in the rear and behind 
what might be called sub-bluffs, being a part of the same system, 
but considerably lower : a difficult spot to describe. It rained hard 
all night, and Gen. Gillmore mourned over the fact that Ids ammu- 
nition got wet. During the day we were on fatigue, and during the 
night unmasked some batteries. AVe got some of our tents the 17th 
from Folly. Terry's forces were ordered to withdraw from James 
Island. There was a visible concentration of forces going on, and 
it was evident we were approaching another crisis. In what shape 
it would come we could onl}^ conjecture. 

Gen. Gillmore ordered the establishment of an Engineer Depot 
at the south end of Morris. 

General Order Xo. 7, \ Department of the South. 

Secmid Series. ) Headquarters in the Field, 

Morris Island, 17 July 1863. 

A depot at which to collect, mauufacture, preserve and distribute en- 
gineer tools and material will be immediately established at the south end 
of Morris Island, to be in charge of Capt. Cruso, New York Volunteer 
Engineers. 

At this depot will be immediately collected, classified and inventoried 
all the tools and materials not now in use on Morris and Folly Islands, which 
materials and tools will be furnished for the siege works on the order of 
Assistant Engineers at all times of day or night. 



312 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [July '63. 

Tools will be kept constantly in repair and order. Engineer material, 
such as fascines, gabions, magazine frames, i)latform stuff', etc., will be 
manufactured at suitable points and kept constantly at the depot. 

Officers and men for above from the Regiment of Volunteer Engineers. 
Edw-. W. Smith, Q. A. Gillmore, 

Assistant Adintant-GeneraL Brh/.-Gen. Cummandint/. 



18 July: An eventful day. The crisis was indeed close at 
hand. The accounts of the proceedings of the day are so numerous 
that it is difficult to make a selection. They do not vary much, ex- 
cept in detail, and are almost invariably from the standpoint of their 
several writers. One notices and notes certain matters he sees ; 
others the same, but not the same matters ; and so on. The day 
was pleasant. We left our camp about 9 o'clock. We laid in the 
sand back of and near Hospital Hill from about 11 a.m. In the 
charge, we went up by the flank. 

One writer relates the following: " As we laj^ on the beach. 
Gen. Strong came along and said, 'What regiment?' We told 
him ; and he said, ' Don't lire a gun, for you have got a regiment 
right ahead of you.' We soon had orders to march," etc. 

After the fight and return to camp, all had a ration of whiskey. 

Acting Adjt. Copp, who had been very ill for several days, 
attempted to go with the regiment, but was obliged to surrender to 
the inevitable and return to camp prior to the charge (see his Per- 
sonal) ; and it is quite jn'obable that we went into the fight without 
an Adjutant (our Adjt. Libby was with Gen. Strong, and was killed 
during the fight). 

Admiral Porter's book sa3\s : " At 4 p.m. the tide changed to 
flood, and the iron-clads closed in to within 300 yards of Wagner, 
and reopened. No more shots from Wagner that afternoon." 

It was reported that Gillmore had previously planned to attack 
Wagner at daybreak, but was obliged to change the time because of 
the non-completiou of certain details, which were seriously interfered 
with by the rains of the two previous nights. 

Another says : " Colors (Third New Hampshire) went over the 
parapet and returned." 

After the fight was practically over, one of our men, being very 
anxious about the safety of a comrade who was missing, crept well 
up to the front and found him. Another says: "We tried all we 
could to get possession of the fort ; but 'twas no use. Gen. Strong 
said: 'Where is the Third New Hampshire?' We sang out, 
' Here ! ' and then he said : ' Colonel, retreat in the best order you 
can,' and we did so ... . And then the Second Brigade tried it on 
with the same result . . . . " 

Having brought the reader right into a fight, — and rather un- 
ceremoniously, too, — we will retrace our steps and take him in in a 
more formal manner, and with dignity. 



314 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [_Juhj '6S. 

CHARGE ON FORT WAGNER. 

The order for bombardment of 1« July 1863 was as follows : — 

Department or the Soi'th. 
Special Order N<>. D. Headquarters in the Field, 

Morris Island, S. C, 17 July 18G3. 

The several batteries against the enemy's positions on the north end of 
Morris Island are named as follows : Batteri/ Eet/nolds, in advance, compris- 
ing tive 8-inch siege mortars, two 30-poimder and six 10-pounder Parrott 
rifles, fonr ?>-inch"rifles and two Wiard rifles. Battery Weed, in rear of 
right of Battery Reynolds, comprising four 10-inch siege mortars. Battery 
Hayes, in rear 'and on the left of Battery Reynolds, comprising nine 30- 
poiinder and four 20-pounder Parrott rifles. Battery O'liourke, in the rear 
of the right of Battery Hayes, comprising five 10-inch siege mortars. Capt. 
Langdon^ First IT. S. Artillery, is assigned to the command of Batteries Rey- 
nolds and Weed . Lieut. -Col. Jackson [not Third New Hampshire] , Assistant 
Inspector-General, with Maj. Bailey, Third Rhode Island Artillery, as as- 
sistant, is assigned to the command of Batteries Hayes and O'Rourke. 

These batteries will be opened upon Fort Wagner, immediately after 
break of day tomorrow. The ttring must be executed Avith great care and 
deliberation". The object of the rifled guns being principally to dismount the 
enemy's guns, they will not expend ammunition when the view of the 
enemy's works is obstructed by smoke. Both time-fuse and percussion 
shells will be used, preferably the former. Each mortar will flre once in 
every Ave minutes, alternating from the right, in each battery. The shells 
should be exploded in or directly over Fort Wagner. 

By order of 
Edw. W. Smith, Q- A. Gillmore, 

Assistant Adjntant-General. Bricj.-Gen. Commanding. 



The following account was written by the Author in 1865, while 
the whole matter was fresh in his memory : — 

On the morning of the 18th, all available troops were marched 
to the front in different positions near the batteries, where they could 
be protected to some extent from the shells of Wagner. Ere long 
the Ironsides slowly and majestically moved toward Wagner, follow- 
ing which were the monitors, their progress being scarcely perceptible. 
We then knew that an attack on Wagner was in contemplation. 

A bombardment was soon begun, which was kept up all day 
with scarcely any intermission and but little effect. Fort Wagner 
replied, sending its iron compliments to army and navy alike. We 
could see every shot ; and whenever a lucky one was made by our 
guns it was cheered. 

.... Just at this time (say one o'clock) a shot from the 
Ironsides cut the halliards on Wagner's flag, and down it came. We 
supposed it had been hauled down, and every man arose to cheer 
what was thought to be a surrender. Caps were thrown in the air, 
etc. ; but our disappointment and chagrin were great when we saw a 
daring rebel seize the flag, and standing boldly on the parapet, hold 
it to the breeze. They soon fastened the flag to the staff" ; and then 
followed a sharp fire which caused us to " cover" in a hurry. Sum- 
ter, Johnson and Gregg joined the fire, and many of our sand holes 
were demolished and we half buried in the ruins. 



,nihl '63.'] THIED NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 315 

.... The bombardment was kept up till dark, when a general 
movement among the troops indicated a different kind of warfare. 
We were marched forward, up the beach, toward Wagner. The 
Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored regiment) was ordered to lead 
the assault. It was now dark, and the darkness increasing ever}' 
moment. On, on and on we marched, beyond our advanced bat- 
teries, beyond our outer pickets, on toward Wagner, which was now 
silent, as also was everything else. 'Twas the calm before a storm. 
I cannot describe fully the scenes which followed : they beggar 
description ; yet I shall give .... a faint idea of what happened 
on that fearful night. We marched silently along, over obstructions, 
pitfalls, limbs of trees, etc., until we arrived in sight of Wagner, 
whose dim outlines could be traced against the distant sky. The 
Fifty-fourth rushed forward with a yell of desperation, echoed suc- 
cessively throughout the whole force. At the same time our monitors 
drew up nearer and poured in a heavy fire. The batteries in our 
rear threw mortar shells over our heads, the sea roared on our right, 
while iu front Wagner poured out a deadly fire of grape and canister, 
and its infantry used their small arms to advantage. A little to the 
left of Wagner, Sumter poured in a galling fire, and on our left 
flank we were raked by Fort Johnson. The scene was truly excit- 
ing, the carnage terrible, the fire deadly, hot and like hail .... 
After the first halt by my regiment, caused by the first and of course 
heaviest fire, but few were able to move on again. IMy companions 
lay around me, some in death, others fatally wounded, and others 
but slightly. Those of the wounded able to go to the rear were 
advised to do so. 

On we moved again, led by our brave Colonel, who always said 
" Come ! " instead of " Go I " But we had only moved a short dis- 
tance when it was found impossible to move further. The colored 
regiment had been repulsed — almost annihilated, and had retreated, 
and our regiment was apparently in the extreme front. On a slight 
elevation of land we halted, the shot and the shell, the grape and 
the canister, rattling in among us like hail, cutting men down like 
grass. The guns and bayonets seemed to suffer (if indeed they 
could suffer) , and many parts of muskets were shot away and the 
bearer left unharmed. At this period in the fight I was hit in the 
left foot by a grape shot. My foot was taken instantly from under 
me, letting me down to the ground. At first I thought my foot was 
shot away ou account of the pain following ; but on examination 
found it still attached to my leg, the boot upon it, but ripped from 
toe to heel. A further examination led to the discovery of a small 
hole in my boot which led me to think that a bullet lay imbedded in 
my foot. jMv foot was now burning with the reaction ; and I re- 
quested a comrade to examine and report, being determined to stay 
where I was if not seriously wounded. He ... . reported a hole 
in my boot and advised me to get to the rear as fast as possible. 
This advice was seconded by the Captain (Handerson). The advice 
was good; but the " as fast as possible" was not a 2.40 gait, for 
my left leg refused to do duty. Bidding Capt. Handerson and the 



316 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJuly '63. 

few men there were left a hasty good-bye, I crawled off to the rear, 
dragging my lame leg after me. My march (?) to the rear was not 
so pleasant as one might imagine, for I now really expected to get 
hit. The shots from the enemy ploughed the sand near me several 
times. My path lay by the shore, and I there saw a sickening sight. 
It was of several unfortunate men lying upon the beach, some dead 
and others dying, the rising tide slowly but surely drowning those 
who lived. A look of pity and a silent prayer was all I could bestow, 
as on I crawled, feeling that I was fortunate in being alive and able 
to crawl. Ere I had passed half the distance between my regiment 
and the advanced batteries, I heard the sound of retreat, followed 
by the yells of victory and defiance of Wagner's garrison. Presently 
the troops came rushing past me . . . .1 watched for members of 
my own regiment, for I could see their outlines against the sk}'. As 
I watched my eye fell on my Captain ; but he was too far away to 
hear me if I called. The next I recognized was a member of my 
own company (Co. K), Dudley Colby, to whom I spoke, and he 
readily consented .... to assist me. 

My leg had so far recovered from numbness that I could rise 
and hobble along by resting my arm on Colby's shoulder .... 
the excitement of the occasion probably having a deal to do with 
my ability to retreat (I carried my own gun) . As we neared the 
advanced batteries, which extended nearly to the beach, it became 
evident that another scene of bloodshed was going on at that point. 
It appears that a company of light artillery had been stationed 
between the battery and the water to arrest those who retreated with- 
out orders. They had been furnished with whiskey and were .... 
too drunk to know or do their duty. As the troops arrived at this 
gap, these drunken artillerymen used their sabres quite lively, cutting 
right and left. No arguments were of avail. A colored man was 
sure to be cut down, and a white man unless wounded was not suf- 
fered to pass unmolested. Soon the pressure became so great that 
the artillery meu were overborne by the crowd. Colby and I passed 
through before the crowd gathered, and after getting out of range 
sat down to rest. Ambulances, one after another, passed us in 
quick succession, carrying the wounded to the rear. After halting- 
several times to rest we arrived in camp, and with some assistance 
my boot was pulled oft". This act caused me excruciating pain. An 
examination of the foot resulted in finding no breaJiing of the skin. 
I was greatly disappointed at tlie result and Avould at the moment 
have paid a high price for a slight abrasion of the slin. To be sure 
it was well it was no worse ; but I would that it had been a very 
little worse. This goes to show that it does not require the loss of 
a limb or a fracture of the same to constitute a wound. Probably I 
suftered more pain than many who were shot through the arm or leg. 
Time and cold water bandages effected a complete cure. I hobbled 
about camp till I went North for conscripts. Gen. George C. Strong 
was fatally wounded in the charge, and my Colonel slightly — the 
former by a grape shot in the thigh, and the latter by a piece of 
shell in the left breast. Our Lieutenant-Colonel (formerly Major) 
was taken prisoner. 



JuJirOS.^ THIKD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 317 

SEYMOUR'S OFFICIAL REPORT. 

18 Jvily : Seymour's official report says : — 

My instructious were to open fire at daylight ; but an exceedingly heavy 
rain had fallen during the preceding night, so flooding the works and de- 
ranging our aflairs generally that it could not be commenced until after 
nine o'clock .... About an hour before sunset I received instructions 
from Gen. Gillmore to arrange for an assault. It was suggested to me that 
Gen. Strong's brigade would suffice; but it was fiiually understood that all 
the force of my command should be held ready for the work .... It con- 
sisted of three flue brigades .... The Fiftj-fourth Massachusetts, a 
colored regiment of excellent character, well officered, with full ranks, 
that had conducted itself comniendably a few days previous on James 
Island, was placed in front .... Brigade commanders were advised to 
form in column of deployed regiments. The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts 
only, being too large .... was in two lines .... 

More than half the distance was well passed when, present myself 
with the column, I saw that to overcome such resistance overpowering 
force must be employed. Maj. Plimpton, Third New Hampshire Volunteers, 
my Assistant Inspector-General, was sent with an order to the Second Bri- 
gade (Putnam) to forward at once. To my surprise this officer returned 
from Col. Putnam, stating that he positively refused to move, Avith the ex- 
planation that he had received orders from Gen. Gillmore to remain where 
he was. 

At that moment the wounded and many unhurt also were coming 
thickly from the front along the beach. Gen. Strong had urged his com- 
mand on with great spirit and gallantry ; but his losses Avere so severe that 
his regiments Avere much shaken, and the consequent confusion Avas much 
heightened by the yielding of the leading regiment, large portions of Avhich 
fell hastily upon those in the rear. Fragments of each regiment, hoAA'ever, 
— brave men, bravely led, — Avent eagerly over the ditch, mounted the parapet 
and struggled Avith the foe inside .... After a painful and unnecessary 
interval. Col. Putnam .... moved his command forAvard. [During the ad- 
vance of this brigade, Seymour was hit by grape shot and Avas superseded 
by Turner.— D. E.] 

Seymour further says he ascribes the defeat to the unfortunate 
delay of Col. Putnam's brigade, and also to the non-support of that 
brigade after it (Putnam's) had essentially succeeded. 



Gen. Gillmore's account of the assault is as follows : — 
Late in the afternoon I advised Admiral Dahlgren that I intended to 
storm the Avork about sunset. The time of tAvilight Avas selected for the 
storming party to move to the attack, in order that it might not be distinctly 
seen from the James Island and Sullivan's Island batteries and from Fort 
Sumter. Brig.-Gen. Truman Seymour commanded the assaulting column, 
fixed its organization and formation, and Avas charged Avith the arrangement 
of the details for the attack. Brig.-Gen. Strong's brigade led the assault. 
It was composed of the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored) Regiment, Col. 
Shaw, Avhich Avas in advance ; the Sixth Connecticut Regiment, Col. Chatfleld ; 
a battalion of the Seventh Connecticut Regiment; the Fort5^-eighth Ncav 
York Regiment, Col. Barton ; the Third New Hampshire Regiment, Col. 
Jackson ;"the Ninth Maine Regiment, Col. Emery, and the Seventy-sixth 
Pennsylvania, Col. StraAA-bridge. It Avas supported by Col. Putnam's bri- 
gade, composed of his oavu regiment, the Seventh Ncav Hampshire. Lieut. - 
Col. Abbott ; the One Hundredth New York Regiment, Col. Dandy ; the 
Sixty-second Ohio Regiment, Col. Pond, and the Sixty-Seventh Ohio Regi- 
ment, Col. Voris. The regimeuts Avere all small in numbers. As the head 
of the column debouched from the First Parallel, the guns in Wagner, Gregg 
and Sumter, and also those on James and Sullivan's Islands, opened on it 



SIH THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Juhj '63. 

rapidlj' and simultaueously ; and when it approached so near the -work that 
the fire from the navy and from our OAvn mortars and the gun batteries on 
our extreme left had to be suspended for fear of hitting our OAvn men, then 
a compact and most destructive musketry fire was instantly poured on the 
advancing column from the parapet by the garrison of the work, which up 
to that moment had remained within the safe protection of the bomb-proof 
shelter, and now emerged therefrom to meet the exigence of the assault. 
The troops however, went gallantly on ; and although the leading regiment 
was soon thrown into a state of great disorder, Avhich reacted disadvan- 
tageously upon and delayed the progress of those which followed and ren- 
dered it necessary to send in the supporting brigade, the southeast bastion 
was gained and held by us for nearly three hours. The advantage which 
the darkness and a perfect knowledge of the interior arrangements of the 
fort gave the enemy, rendered it necessary for us to relinquish our hold 
upon it. Our loss was very severe, especially in valuable officers of rank. 
Among the latter, who were either killed upon the spot or died subsequently 
of their wounds, were Brig. -Gen. George C. Strong, and Cols. John L. 
Chatfield, Haldimand S. Putnam and Robert G. Shaw. Brig. -Gen Seymour 
and several regimental commanders were severely wounded. The behavior 
of the troops, under the circumstances, Avas unexceptionable, particularly 
that of the commanding officers. 



The Neiv York Times of 27 July I860 says of the assault of 
the 18th: — 

The Sixth Connecticut regiment Avas next in support of the Fifty- 
fourth Massachusetts ; and they also suffered terribly, being compelled to 
retire after a stubborn contest. The Ninth Maine, which was next in line, 
Avas broken up by the passage of the remnant of the repulsed colored regi- 
ment through its lines, and retii-ed in confusion, except three companies, 
which nobly stood their ground. 

It now devolved upon the Third New Hampshire Regiment to push for- 
Avard ; and led by Gen. Strong and Col. Jackson in person, the gallant felloAvs 
dashed up against the fort. Three companies actually gained the ditch, and 
Avading through the Avater, found shelter against the embankment. Here 
Avas the critical point of the assault ; and the Second Brigade, which should 
have been up and ready to support their comrades of the First, were unac- 
countably delayed. Gen. Strong then gave the order to fall back and lie 
down on the glacis, which Avas obeyed Avithout confusion. 

It Avas Avhile Avaiting here, exposed to the heavy fire, that Gen. Strong 
was wounded. A fragment of shell entered his thigh, passing entirely 
through the ffeshy part and making a serious Avound, although the bone 
escaped fracture. The breast of Col. Jackson's coat was torn off* at the 
same time by a piece of shell, slightly Avounding him. Neither of these 
brave men Avould lie doAvn to escape the rain of metal, but stood unfiinch- 
ingly throughout, eliciting the unbounded admiration of their men. Finding 
that the supports did not come. Gen. Strong gave the order for his brigade 

to retire, and the men left the field in perfect order The list of killed 

Avounded and missing foots up 1,530. [This account of the Third Ncav 
Hampshire and Gen. Strong is more nearly correct than any I have ever 
found printed. — D. E.] 

The New York, Times gives the losses as follows : — 

Forty-eighth Ncav York (8 companies) 255 

One Hundredth Ncav York (9 companies) 124 

Sixth Connecticut 139 

Third Ncav Hampshire 14(5 

Seventh Ncav Hampshire 212 

Ninth Maine 113 

Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored) 251 



Juhj '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 319 

The Neu: York Herald had substautially the same figures for the 
above regiments, and added : — 

Seventy-sixth Pennsylvauia 24 

Sixty-second Ohio 151 • 

Sixty-seventh Ohio 125 

Making a grand total of 1540 

The Mu- York Herald of 27 July 1.S63 says : — 

.... Strong's brigade marched in colnnin up past the old building 

on the right of our batteries, then deployed and marched in line a short 

distance, then deployed again, and then marched up the beach in close column, 

Putnam's brigade following at supporting distance, and halting at a point 

Avhere they had been ordered to stop -when Strong's brigade (led by 

hira) had got two-thirds the distance to the fort, the cannonading ceased, to 
avoid injuring our own troops .... a thousand muskets flashed, almost 
together, and poured a deadly tire into our troops .... they never stag- 
gered, never wavered, did not stop for those Avho fell .... they reached 
the ditch and crossed it, some on planks, some rushing down in and toiling 
up, some seeking a better entrance to the left, where the ditch was, however, 
filled with Avater. As they were making the crossing, howitzers in the 
bastions kept up a raking tire, prostrating many but not deterring the mass. 
Over they went, and clambered up the parapets. But grape met them every- 
where, SAveepingthe ditch, the curtain outside, the parapets above; and the 
rebel infantry, seeing all but unseen themselves, peppered them Avith bullets, 
and gave no chance to respond eflcctually. Some retreated Avithout further 
efl'ort; the majority struggled manfully, and charged doAvn over the parapet, 
driA'ing all before them. There Avas certain danger noAv in retreating, un- 
certain danger in staying or advancing. The rebels Avere driven from one 
corner, over a traverse ; and the Sixth Connecticut, Avhose colors Avere 
planted on the parapet .... the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts found a place 
further doAvn (left) and charged bravely over the parapet .... but the 
rebels made a dash at them, Avith all their bitter feeling against negro troops 
aroused, and neglected all else for the moment 



Capt. Ayer (afterward killed in Virginia) said in a letter of 6th 
August: " I marched over . . . . into the trench . . . . when I dis- 
covered that a pai't of my men only were with me. I rushed back 
(to rally the rest), and while standing in an exposed positon .... 
a ball struck me in the spine, at the small of my back. I was at this 
time about 60 feet from the parapet, OA^er which 1,500 rebels were 
firing. . . . . for a week I couldn't lie down on my back." In a 
letter of 31st July he said he had seen the official reports of the 
losses: killed, wounded and missing, 1,507. 

The Historian of the One Hundredth New York says: "The 
colors of the [his] regiment were planted on the fort by Sergt. 
Flanders, Co. A, who was killed ; and the colors were brought away 
by Corpl. Spooner, Co. A." He also names eight officers killed and 
wounded. He further says: "Co. I, Capt. Brunk, was on duty at 
south end of Morris Island at time of assault," and that a complete 
list of killed, wounded and missing was sent to Board of Trade, 
Albany. 

An account of this memorable charge, Avritten by Adjt. Webber 
of the Seventh New Hampshire, is inserted for its historical value : — 



320 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJuly '63. 

On the morning of 18 July 1863, the United States forces were formed 
upon the beach of Morris Island at 9 a.m. The Avhole available strength of 
the Seventh New Hampshire had been detailed for fatigue duty the night 
before, and, during a violent thunder storm, had worked until nearly day- 
break, preparing the batteries which were to pour their iron storm upon 
Fort Wagner on the ensuing day. Brig. -Gen. Truman H. Seymour com- 
manded the forces, which were arranged as follows : First Brigade, Brig.- 
Gen. Strong; Second Brigade, Col. H. S. Putnam (Seventh New Hampshire) ; 
Third Brigade, Brig. -Gen. Stevenson. The Second Brigade was composed 
of the Seventh New Hampshire (Lieut. -Col. Abbott), One Hundredth New 
York (Col. Dandy), Sixty-second Ohio (Col. Steel), and the Sixty-seventh 
Ohio (Col. Voris). The Seventh New Hampshire, as the regiment of the 
ranking colonel, had the right of the line. The dysentery, which prevailed 
among the troops while on Folly Island, had enormously swelled the sick 
list of the Seventh, and the Adjutant reported to the brigade commander but 
four hundred and eighty officers and men present for duty after the line was 
formed. 

The action was commenced soon after by the fleet, the New Ironsides, 
with five monitors, taking position directly in front of the fort; while the 
wooden gunboats, at a distance entirely out of range of the enemy's guns, 
kept up a slow but accurate Are from their large Parrott rifles. It v.'as 
nearly noon when Gen. Gillmore and his Stafl" rode up and ascended the 
lookout on the sand liills, where, perched upon the topmost timber, with his 
feet hanging over and his lorgnette at his eyes, he watched the etiect of the 
shells. The mortars of the First Parallel had kept up a desultory fire for an 
hour or more ; but now the whole line opened, and fifty heavy guns and 
mortars added their thunder to those of the naval force. For a short time 
Fort Wagner answered ; but the fire of the National batteries was too accu- 
rate and heavy, and erelong the south front, facing our batteries, was silent. 
An occasional gun from tlie sea face was fired at the iron-clads or at the 
wooden gunboats, if they appeared to approach, while Forts Sumter and 
Johnson from their barbette guns, and the earthworks on James Island, 
threw 8 and 10-inch shells into our batteries. From both Sumter and 
Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island, a heavy fire was directed at 
the iron-clad vessels, which, lying but a short distance in front of Fort 
Wagner, Avere endeavoring to dismount the guns upon the sea face. The 
damage was but slight in our trenches, which were carefully constructed. 
A caisson was exploded in one of the batteries by a shell, and a few casualties 
occurred. From our position on the beach we could see the shells bursting in 
and around the fort, the clouds of dust rising high in the air as they plunged 
into the loose sand of which it was built. Twice the rebel colors were shot 
away, and twice a few daring men came out upon the parapet and raised 
them again ; but ignorant as every one, from tlie general commanding doAvn, 
was of the construction of the fort, it seemed as if that shower of ponder- 
ous missiles, bursting all around them, must destroy or drive away the 
garrison. We were soon to be undeceived. Long and dreary seemed the 
hours of the afternoon as we lay upon the hot sand of the beach, scorching 
in the rays of an unclouded sun and speculating upon the results of the 
bombardment. About sundown Gen. Gillmore called up his brigade com- 
manders ; and on Col. Putnam's return we learned that an assault had been 
determined on — contrary to his advice, as he said. " I told the General," 
said he, "I did not think we could take the fort so; but Seymour overruled 
me. Seymour is a devil of a fellow for dash." To Maj. Henderson he re- 
marked, " We are all going into Wagner, like a flock of sheep." 

Gen. Strong's brigade was to make the assault, supported by Col. 
Putnam's; while Gen. Stevenson's was to form the reserve. Col. Putnam 
now directed that the caps should be removed from the rifles, as our depend- 
ence must be on the bayonet, should we come to fighting. In the regiment 
behind us (One Hundredth New York) this order was neglected; Col. Dandy 
saying that his " men never fired without orders " — a statement sadly ami 
signally disproved within an hour. The Second Brigade, then moving up 
the beach, deployed in column of regiments a short distance in rear of 
the batteries. The First Brigade moved forward, and, to cover their ad- 



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SIEGE OPERATIONS 

MORRIS ISLAi-ilRLESTOi HARBOR, 

July lOlh-Sepl. 6lh, 1863. 

Coplid (pom B(p«rl of tijmim'l ?. », CILLHORE, ConmaDiHag, 




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Jalij'63.'] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 321 

vance, the fire of the ordnance Avas increased. The guns had been discharged , 
slowly and regularly, to avoid heating, through tlie day ; but now the broad- 
side of the Ironsides flashed a continual flame; and from monitors, gunboats 
and land batteries, every gun that bore on Fort Wagner was plied with the 
utmost rapidity. The reply of the heavy ordnance from Sumter and James 
Island, and the constant bursting of the shower of 8, 10 and 15-inch shells, 
joined in a terrific uproar. In the midst of it a boat's crew was called for ; 
and the old crew of the Colonel's barge, under Corpl. Palmer of Co. F, 
rowed out to one of the advanced monitors, to carry an officer, with a com- 
munication from the General. 

The Second Brigade was now deployed into column by platoons upon 
the beach, in order to pass the narrow defile between the batteries of the 
First Parallel and the rising tide, and again moved forAvard. At a signal 
from the lookout the fire of the National guns now ceased, by sea and land. 
The stoi-ming column was so near the fort as to be endangered by the fire 
of their friends, and for a few moments nothing broke the silence but the 
tramp of the marching column and the swell of the surf upon the sandy 
beach. Then, as if roused from sleep. Fort Wagner opened its batteries. 
Its heavy siege guns, howitzers and 42-pounder carronades, the spoil of some 
of Uncle Sam's navy-yards, poured a cross fire of grape and canister upon the 
narrow neck of sand along which the crowded column of storraers must 
advance, while the profile of the parapet Avas outlined in sparkling •fire 
against the dark thunder clouds rising behind by the rifles of the garrison, 
Avho, secure in their immense bomb-proof during the long hours of the 
bombardment, had sprung to the parapet upon its cessation, to repel the 
expected assault. 

Col. Putnam noAV deployed his brigade to column of regiments, it 
having reached the edge of the fire ; but small as Avas the number of the 
Seventh, so narroAV the neck of solid ground upon Avhich we were advancing, 
that six companies only had dressed upon the line Avhen the salt marsh, lying 
along the creek that divides Morris and James Islands, prevented any far- 
ther extension of the line in that direction ; and four companies remained eti 
echelon to the rear. The order was now given to lie doAvn ; and though the 
missiles whistled overhead, or cut aAvay the grass around us, no one as yet 
was touched. Stragglers now came running back from the front, Avhere the 
yells and cheers SAvelled high amid the roar of artillery : some Avounded, 
some panic-stricken, who, Avhen denied a passage through our line, plunged 
into the SAvamp and made their Avay around. Col. Putnam now rode up be- 
hind us and called, "Seventh Ncav Hampshire, forAA'ard!" Springing to 
their feet, the line pushed on into the storm of shot that seemed to fill the 
air like the drops of a summer shoAver. " What's that they're shooting at 
us?" said one man to me, as I passed along the line to my post. " It looks 
bigger than a hogshead coming." This grape Avas from a •t2-pound carronade. 
The regiment moved at first in excellent order ; but the shot moAved great gaps 
in their ranks, and the flying remnants of the First Brigade, breaking through, 
disordered it still more. Closing up as Avell as possible, the regiment reached 
the ditch — a trench Avith sloping sides, some fifty feet in Avidth, ten in 
depth, and for the Avhole length of the south front waist-deep in water and 
soft mud, though at the southeast angle and along the sea front it Avas dry. 
It Avas enfiladed by heavy hoAvitzers, and strcAvn on its side Avith dead and 
dying; Avhile the less severely Avounded Avere craAvling off toAA^ards the 
beach, Avhere they AA'ould be sheltered from the fire. A portion of the First 
Brigade Avere still upon the parapet at the southeast angle ; and the right of 
the regiment, AA'hich descended into the ditch at that point, crossed. I'hose 
at the left, finding the ditch impassable, croAvded to the- right or, moAved down 
by the enemy's fire, broke to the rear. The companies, en echelon, passed 
clear around the right, and some of them scaled the parapet upon its sea face. 
The regiment behind, Avhich had not removed the caps from their rifles, 
hesitating on the edge of the ditch, poured a heavy volley into their friends 
in front. Lieut. -Col. Abbott, vainly endeavoring to rally and control the 
disorganized and broken ranks outside the ditch, Avas forced back Avith them, 
and all regimental action ceased. 

From this point my narrative becomes a personal one. Crossing the 
ditch near the southeast angle, I found myself, on reaching the crest of 



322 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [J"»?// '6S. 

the parapet, in a corner where the bomb-proof, rising some six feet higher 
than the parapet, atforcled a protection in front from the enemy's lire. 
Crowded upon the parapet, the slope of the bomb-proof and in the corner, 
were one or two liundred men, from all the regiments in both brigades, 
among which the few that I could make out as belonging to the Seventh 
New Hampshire were scattered. It was in vain that I tried, in the tumul- 
tuous crowd, to get them together. All was wild uproar, with the groans 
and cries of the wounded; men calling for their officers, officers calling for 
their men ; and many, in wild excitement, yelling with no apparent object but 
to add to the confusion. Capt. Brown of Co. K stood upon the bomb-proof, 
trying in vain to excite some men to follow him. Capt. Rollins, Co. F, of 
the center, Lieut. Knowlton, Co. D, left flank, and Lieut. Bennett, Co. B, 
had all crossed at the same point; and no two men who stood together be- 
longed to the same company, if by chance to the same regiment. Col. Put- 
nam, delayed by his horse being shot from under him, now entered the fort 
and ordered an attempt to charge and silence one of the guns that flanked 
the sea face and still swept the top and sides of the bomb-proof with grape. 
Lieut. Bennett and myself then joined Capt. Brown upon the top of the bomb- 
proof, and a few men moved to follow us. The position of the gun could 
be plainly seen in the gathering darkness, by the burning fragments of car- 
tridges before its muzzle ; but right across the path yawned a wide, deep, 
blat;k pit, — an opening into the bomb-proof in rear of a seaward em- 
brasure, — up from which came occasional shots. To the left was apparently 
a chance to get around ; but the road Avas blocked by a crowd of men, sitting, 
lying or standing: some disabled by wounds, some apparently paralyzed by 
fear. As we attempted to force a path through them, a shell burst in our 
midst. Bennett was killed; Brown, mortally wounded, Avas carried ofl" by 
his men ; and one of my legs, with a smart shock, went out from under me, 
and refused duty. The men fell back, and I crawled over the edge of the 
bomb-proof again, among the increasing throng of wounded and dying, to 
see how much I was hurt. I was relieved to find it more a bruise than a 
wound, f roui which the numbness soon began to pass away. 

Col. Putnam went up on the bomb-proof, and endeavored to get up a 
charge, but in vain ; after which, drawing his men into the crowded corner 
of the fort, he endeavored to hold out until reinforcements, for which he 
had sent, should arrive. The enemy made one charge upon us; but Avere 
driA'en back by our Are. Shortly afterAvard a ball through the head stretched 
Col. Putnam among the slain, just as he had announced to Capt. Rollins his 
determination to hold out to the last. Maj. Butler (Sixty-seventh Ohio), 
Capt. Rollins and myself, were now the only officers left; and the small 
force of men Avere AvoefuUy thinned, while the dead and dying Avere piled 
over the small space we held. 

So long a time had elapsed since reinforcements were sent for, that 
Maj. Butler began to fear that the officer AA'ho Avas sent had failed to cross 
the belt of fire that still SAvept the outside of the ditch; and expecting a 
charge every moment, to which our small force could oppose but feeble re- 
sistance, he at last gave the order to retreat. Taking a last shot over the 
bomb-proof, we silently skedaddled toAvard our lines. 

We had hardly got into comparative safety outside the fort AA^hen Ave 
met Gen. Stevenson's brigade marching to our relief — the dispatch sent for 
help haA'ing been delayed through some inadvertence of the officer sent Avith 
it; and we had the mortiflcation of feeling that, had Ave held out fifteen 
minutes longer — in spite of Avhat seemed inevitable death or capture — the 
fortune of the fight wovild have been changed, and the fort, Avhich had cost 
so many lives and was to cost so many more, would have been Avon that 
night. 

Admiral Porter's book says : " The assaulting force consisted of 
Seventh Connecticut, Third New Hampshire, Ninth Maine, Seventy- 
sixth Pennsylvania and Forty-eighth New York, under Gen. Strong ; 
the Seventh New Hampshire, Sixth Connecticut, Sixty-second Ohio, 



Jnhj '6.3.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 323 

One Hundredth New York and Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, under Col. 
Putnam." He makes no mention of the reserve brigade, and evidently 
did not take pains to arrange the regiments in their proper order : for 
he goes on to say that the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored) was 
in the advance, that it was supported by the Sixth Connecticut, and 
next in line of assault was the Ninth Maine, and this followed by the 
Third New Hampshire. He also says : "Three companies of the last 
named regiment gained the ditch, waded through the water, and 
found shelter against the embankment." (This is substantially the 
New York Times account, which see.) 

The One Hundredth New York Historian says : "It was not so 
dark that the enemy could not see us forming .... that carnage, 
that carnival of death, that slaughter of loved ones, that hell of terror 
and fire, that thunderous roar of heavy ordnance and din of small 
arms, mingled with one of the most appalling storms of thunder and 
lightning ever seen or experienced — such as only a Southern sky can 
hold, when the faces of the soldiery as they advanced could only be 
seen by the lurid glare of heaven's lightning : this charge of brave 
men, over a smooth surface, flanked by sea and swamp, with not a 
stump, tree, shrub or hillock to ' cover ' for a moment . . . . " 

Cannon to the right of them, 
Cannon to the left of them, 
Cannon behind them — 
Volleyed and thundered. 

Stormed at with shot and shell, 
They that had fought so well 
Came through the jaws of death, 
Back from the mouth of hell — 
AU that was left of them. 

The C'omte de Paris says of it, that the Confederates had 28 
wounded during the bombardment preceding the assault, and 146 
wounded during the assault ; while they buried 600 Federals after 
the assault. 

Of the fort itself he says: "It presented a frontage of 325 
yards, protected by an impassable morass save for about 43 yards — 
the breadth of the tongue of firm land connecting it with the rest of 
Morris Island." He further says : " The ditch was provided with a 
sluice gate, by which high tide water could be retained." 

The "History of the Sixty-second Ohio" (see "Ohio in the 
War" : Vol. II., page 366) says the Sixty-second lost in the charge 
of the 18th July 150 killed, wounded and missing. Officers killed: 
Capt. Paul, Lieuts. Johnson, Fountz, Knoop, Berdling and Brownell. 
A scene of the assault is thus described : " The rear division of the 
Seventh New Hampshire and a portion of the One Hundredth New 
York, massed together, crossed the ditch and essayed to get a foot- 
ing from one point ; while the Sixty-second and Sixty-seventh Ohio 
made an assault at another. One corner of the fort only was occu- 
pied by the National forces, and that was swept by grape and can- 
ister and exposed to musketry. The troops looked back, saw they 
were alone, and began to falter. No relief came, and, sad and dis- 



324 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Juhj'6^. 

appointed, they fell back and left the field and their dead and wounded 
in the hands of the enemy." (This regiment left Morris Island 31st 
October.) 

" Ohio in the War" : Vol. II., page 390, says of the Sixty-seventh 
Ohio : " Capt. Albert and Lieut. Baxter killed at Fort Wagner 18th 
July. Was in the siege seven months, and sustained a heavy loss 
[number not stated] in the attack on Wagner." 

Of the Sixth Connecticut a private letter says it had about 300 
men in the charge. That the regiment's position was at the head of 
the column (i. e., on the right), but at the request of Col. Shaw of 
the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts (colored), the Colonel of the Sixth 
Connecticut, who had command of the First Brigade, gave to the 
Fifty-fourth Massachusetts the right of the line. That the Sixth 
Connecticut, or a part of it, reached the inside of Wagner (really the 
salient) and staid there about two hours. That their loss was 141 
killed, wounded and missing. 

[From private letter from Gen. Seymour, in 1881.] 

". . . . the entire force on Morris Island was to take part in 
the assault .... there were three brigades, under Gen. Strong, Col. 
Putnam and Gen. Stevenson. The decision to assault was made to- 
ward the evening of the 18th at the Signal Tower " 

Query : Why was the advance given to the Fifty-fourth Massa- 
chusetts, and did Col. Shaw request it? 

Arisicer : "Col. Shaw, so far as known to me, was not con- 
sulted, and expressed no choice in the matter. It was believed that 
the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts was in every respect as efficient as 
Siuj other body of men in the command ; and as it was one of the 
strongest and best officered, there seemed no good reason why it 
should not be selected for the advance. This point was decided by 

Gen. Strong and myself The regiments were to advance in 

line, so as to avoid loss as far as possible from the artillery of Fort 
Wagner." 

[From private letter from Gen. Gillmore, in 1881.] 

". . . . the column started from vicinity of the First Parallel, 
about 4,000 feet from Wagner, and exposed to artillery fire only 
from a distance which was not very damaging. When the column 
reached a point about 200 yards from the fort, our vessels were 
obliged to stop the fire on Wagner, and the musketry of the latter 
was at once brought to bear on the head of the column, and was very 
disastrous." 

Query : Why was the advance given to the Fifty- fourth Massa- 
chusetts ; did Col. Shaw request it, or was there some other reason? 

Answer: "I am unable to answer these questions, for want of 
knowledge. Gen. Seymour had command of the forces .... and 
was directed to make the assault, after a conference on the subject 
had been held between him. Gen. Strong and myself. Seymour ar- 
ranged all the details . . . ." 

Query : How long did the engagement last? 



Jahi '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 325 

Ansioer : ' ' The preliminary artillery firing, the march forward 
from the First Parallel, the assault and final withdrawal from under 
fire, consumed a little more than three hours, I think. From the 
journal kept in Fort Sumter by Confederate Col. Alfred Rhett, I 
make the following extract, which refers to this assault: ' 7.20 p.m., 
18 July — Enemy assaulted battery; after engagement of three 
hours and five minutes, were repulsed.' .... Gen. W. B. Talia- 
ferro commanded .... think he had about 1,700 men .... 
23 July, the enemy's force was 1,444 .... our loss was about 
1,500 killed, wounded and missing." 



WHAT CARLETON SAYS OF WAGNER. 
l.National Tribune, 22 Oct. 18.S5.1 

.... The thunder of the cannonade rolls far away. The people of 
Edgefield, 130 miles distant, hear the deep and heavy roll. The shell toss 
up columns of sand, the solid shot plow great furrows in the parapets. 
The fort reaches from the sandy shore of the Atlantic, across the island 
to the green marshes .... on the seaward side there is a traverse and 
curtain protecting a sally-port, from which a flanking fire can be poured 
straight down the level beach, where the surf is gently rolling. The para- 
pets are broad and solid : slaves have thrown them up and beat them 
down hard. Outside is a deep moat. When the tide comes in, the water 
of the sea surges through it. Inside the fort are covered ways, into 
which the soldiers can run for shelter. The fort is built in such a way 
that an attacking force will be enfiladed by a portion of the guns. There 
are brave men in the fort ; but nearly all of them find shelter in the bomb- 
proofs — 1,200 of them, waiting for the assault. 

Gen. Strong's brigade was to lead the assault : Fifty-fourth Massachu- 
setts (colored troops from Massachusetts, commanded by Col. Shaw — 
troops hated and despised by the Confederates, not only because they were 
colored, but because Massachusetts had enlisted them). Sixth Connecticut, 
a battalion of the Seventh Connecticut, Third New Hampshire, Forty- 
eighth New York, Ninth Maine and Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania. The 
Second Brigade .... Col. Putnam : Seventh New Hampshire, One Hun- 
dredth New York, Sixty-second Ohio and Sixty-seventh Ohio. Gen. Sey- 
mour commanded the division. While the sun was going down, the regi- 
ments formed on the beach in columns of eight companies. The Fifty- 
fourth Massachusetts was to have the honor of leading the assault. Possi- 
bly it was a mistake. These troops had had little experience. They were 
brave and marched resolutely. Possibly none of the regiments Avould 
have accomplished more than did they ; but when great deeds are to be 
done, men of nerve, endurance and discipline are needed .... At a signal, 
the Union batteries and monitors become silent. The Confederate sentinels 
send word that the Federals are advancing. The Confederates spring to 
their feet and rush to the breastworks. The artillerymen ram home the 
charges of grape and canister, double-shotting the guns. Three companies 
of the Charleston Battalion man the right; in the center stand the 
soldiers of the Fifty-first North Carolina; two companies hold the left 
over by the marshes. All is silent for a moment. The column is within a 
quarter of a mile of the fort when the storm bursts forth. Solid shot, 
shell, grape, shrapnel, canister and minie balls scream through the air. 
.... "Double quick I " is the order of Col. Shaw, and his regiment goes 
upon the run over the yellow sand into the teeth of the pitiless storm. 
They reach the deep ditch and stand for a moment upon its brink. Their 
resolute commander does not hesitate, but leaps into it. " Forward ! " he 
shouts, and the larger part follow him. Mounting the parapet, planting 
the flag gallantly upon the ramparts, Sergt. Carney, Color Bearer, is 
wounded, but clings to the flag. Col. Shaw falls headlong into the ditch. 



326 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. l-July '63. 

The gronncl is strewn with his brave men. Their leader gone, they lose 
their heads, rush to the rear panic-stricken, charging through the Ninth 
Maine and Seventy-sixth Pennsylvania, breaking their ranks and creating 
confusion in those regiments. Undaunted by the terrilic fire, tlie Sixth 
Connecticut charge upon the southeast section of the fort, cross the ditch, 
climb the parapef, and force their way into the works. Putnam's brigade 
sweeps on : the Seventh New Hampshire leaps into the ditch, climbs the 
parapet, and fights with desperation. The other regiments one by one join 
in the struggle; but the fearful slaughter thins their ranks. The attack 
almost succeeds, but fails at the supreme moment. The soldiers ))y the sea 
fall back in the darkness, leaving the Sixth Connecticut within the works. 
.... The converging fire of the Confederates on the narrow approach pre- 
vents a rally. The darkness deepens, the smoke is dense. It is not easy to 
distinguish friend from foe, and it is impossible to renew the assault. No 
support has come to the Sixth Connecticut. Grape and musketry sweep 
the ground over which it has passed. The Thirty-first Georgia has been 
sent in hot haste to Wagner. With two companies of the Charleston 
Battalion, they charge upon the men from Connecticut, who, finding their 

retreat cut ofl', surrender The Sabbath sun rises upon the sickening 

scene, looking down upon heaps of dying and dead lying in the ditch, upon 
the parapet and among the sand hills, the wounded moaning for water or 

praying that death may come to relieve them of their suflerings 

Eight hundred were buried where they fell, the Confederates scooping 
shallow graves upon the beach. The wind blew the sand away ; the waves 
rolled in upon the bleaching skeletons. Sad and mournful the story ! 



The Historian of tlie Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania gives the 
losses, as follows : — 

KILLED. WOUNDED. MISSING. 

Off. Men. Off. Men. OfE. Men. 

Strong's brigade 10 22 88 436 15 314 

Putnam's " 15 22 34 357 6 206 

The Fifty-fourth Massachusetts went into the fight with about 
600 men and 22 officers. 

The Sixth Connecticut Historian says of his regiment, that 
there were 141 killed, wounded and missing. 

Wliile the Union troops were in the salient of AVagner, they 
actually captured and sent to the rear a rebel lieutenant, one 
corporal and four privates. 

The naval force was as follows : At short range : Ketv Iron- 
sides, Montauk, CatsMl, Nantasket, Weehawken, Patapsco. At 
long range : Ottatoa, Paul Jones, Seneca, Chippeiva, Wissahickon. 

Confederate reports show no casualties in the Thirty-first North 
Carolina. This was the regiment which didn't man the salient when 
desired to do so. Fifty of this regiment arrived at Morris Island 
12th July, from Wilmington, and the rest of the regiment arrived at 
Charleston on the 13th. 



THE HEROES OF WAGNER. 

The New South of 24 Oct. 1863 had the following concerning 
the Union dead at Wagner (1<S July 1863) : — 

They fought with banner overhead. 
Till Wagner's top and floor Avere red 
With blood of foes and leaders dead : 
O memorable battle hour, 
How deep the spell of thy strange power! 



Jnlir6:^.-\ THIRD XEAY HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 327 

Diverse of lines, but one of life, 
What heroes perished in the strife? - 
No! perished not those valiant men — 
In more than life thej' live again : 
Their deathless deeds we grateful own, 
And bid them live in long renown. 

How many noble patriots fell, 

Our history's page shall truthful tell. 

There, wounded, lay our honored Strong : 

His deeds a theme for stirring song ; 

His name in love for aye shall live, 

The Nation's bosom is his grave. 

There Putxam, cheering on his baud. 

With sword and banner Arm in hand, 

Poured on the parapet his blood, 

And made his tomb where martyrs trod. 

There lifeless fell, 'mid battle cries, 

Where yet a monument shall rise. 

The gallant Shaw, whose rude-dug grave 

Was with his sable soldiers brave : 

That bloody trench ordained to be 

The ground of new-born Liberty. 

Alike for Chatfield freemen weep. 
And bid fair fame his record keep : 
Such hero records for our race 
Nor time, nor change, can e'er eflace. 
Oh, yes ! let history proud unroll, 
High on her fair and precious scroll, 
The cherished names of all the braves 
Who sleep thus loved in martyrs' graves : 
For still it is for Earth's best good. 
Comes only through vicarious blood ; 
And men can never let such die 
As give their lives for Liberty. 



On the day after the charge, the Acljutaut aud Chaplain of the 
Tenth Connecticut went out to assist in caring for the wounded, 
under the misapprehension that an armistice prevailed. In this 
they were mistaken and were captured by a Confederate sergeant 
and squad, or rather by a Confederate officer who had been referred 
to for information as to whether there was an armistice. Adjt. 
Camp and Chaplain Trumbull protested against being held under 
such circumstances, and the matter of holding them was in dispute ; 
but still they were held. Finally, after two or three hours of deep- 
est anxiety, they were blindfolded and led into captivity, up past 
Wagner to Cumming's Point, where the}^ remained till night. During 
this time they were told their case was as yet undecided. In the 
evening they were put on steamer, with others, and sent up to the 
city, stopping awhile at Fort Sumter. They were marched through 
the streets with the colored prisoners of the Fifty-fourth Massachu- 
setts, the crowd jeering. They reached jail about ten at night, and 
were put in a small room with colored prisoners. 

A Tenth Connecticut man wrote thus (see "The Knightly 
Soldier") : "The morning of Saturday, 18 July, brought the troops 
(Stevenson's brigade and others of Gen. Terry's James Island 



328 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJuly '63. 

force) to the shore of Folly Island. Marching to its upper end, 
they were ferried across Light-House Creek to Morris Island, just 
as the heavy bombardment of Fort Wagner was begun by the land 
batteries and fleet .... The tired troops from James Island had 
but little time to rest. About 5 p.m. came the order to fall in and 
march down to the shore. We were not the only troops .... re- 
ceiving the same instructions. Far up the beach stretched the long 
column, of which Stevenson's brigade formed less than a third part. 
.... We were to storm the fort .... scarcely three hours' rest 
.... the announcement sent new strength through each vein .... 
We anticipated at first the leading place in the assault. Reaching 
at length the outermost range of sand hills .... our brigade was 
detached from the column and sent into the trenches .... to re- 
main .... till needed .... On our left, a feAv yards from us, 
stood Gen. Gillmore and his Staff." 



THE DEP^ENCE OF WAGNER. 

The following (from Confederate sources) gives a very good idea 
of the garrison, armament, etc., of the fort: — 

Garrison (about 1,700 men) : Fifty-first North Carolina, Thir- 
ty-first North Carolina, Charleston Battalion, First South Carolina 
(acting as artillery). Sixty-third Georgia Heavy Artillery, First 
Company Light Artillery. Gen. W. B, Taliaferro was in command. 
His Staff comprised : Capt. Twiggs, Quartermaster-(ieneral ; Capt. 
W. T. Taliaferro, Adjutant-General ; Lieut. H. C. Cunningham, 
Ordnance Officer ; Lieut. Mazyck, Ordnance Officer ; Lieut. 
Meade, Aide-de-Camp ; Lieut. Stoney, Aide-de-Camp ; Maj. Hol- 
comb ; Capt. Burke, Quartermaster ; Dr. Habersham, Surgeon-in- 
Chief ; Private Stockman, of McEuerj^'s Louisiana Battalion (Clerk 
and Aide). 

Armament (from private letter of Gen. Taliaferro, LS82) : 
On the sea face : 1 10-inch Columbiad, 2 32-pounder smooth bores. 
On the southeast bastion, operating on land and sea : 1 32-pounder, 
rifled and banded. On the south point of bastion, operating on 
land : 1 42-pounder carrouade. On the curtain, with direct fire, 
mounted on barbette carriages in embrasure : 2 8- inch naval shell 
guns, 1 8-inch sea coast howitzer, 1 32-pounder smooth bore. On 
the flank defences of the curtain : 2 32-pouuder carronades, on siege 
carriages, in embrasure. On the southern face : 1 32-pounder car- 
rouade, en barbette. On the southwest angle : 1 10-iuch sea coast 
mortar. On the western gorge : 1 32-pounder carrouade. 

[From private letter of Gen. Taliaferro, 1882.] 

.... Some light field guns, added to the above. My recollection is 
that two of the 8-inch shell guns from the work, with direct fire, and one 
howitzer on the right, outside, and two field guns (or there may have been 
four; but I think not) on the left. Mere all the guns which Avere fired after 
the bombardment ceased. There was (I think) a musketry parapet on the 
northerly side of the work; but it was not used during the assault, no 
enemy having passed to our rear. I think the assaulting column M-as about 



Juhj '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 329 

150 yards distant, when I opened fire. The correct distance can be ascer- 
tained by a coast survey chart, for the flre was not delivered till you 
reached the little creek. We were not driven from the parapet at any time 
.... I do not think there Avere any colored troops among those who 
surrendered on the southeast bastion, although we captured some colored 
men .... The men in the bastion were from Connecticut .... my im- 
pression is that the greater part of our loss was sustained at the beginning 
of the assault, and in front of the curtain, though we sufiered some con- 
siderable loss from [by] the troops who gained the bastion. 

[Extracts from Commanding Officer's Report.] 

Charleston, 21 July 1863. 
Capt. Nance, Assistant Adjutant-General : 

I have the honor to report .... the operations of the troops of my 
command on Morris Island, during the week commencing Monday, the 
13th inst.. and particularly the occurrences of Saturday, the 18th inst., 
which terminated in a most decisive and overwhelming repulse of the 
enemy. On Monday, the 13th, I made .... an inspection of ... . the 
island .... and on Tuesday morning relieved Col. Graham of .... in- 
cluding the garrison of Forts Wagner and Gregg. I found that the Abo- 
litionists occupied the island in force, from the southern point to Griggs 
Hill, upon which they were already erecting batteries and liad constructed 
a signal station : that they had thrown forward their skirmishers to a 
point indicated by a single palmetto tree, one mile and a quarter to their 
front, and about three-quarters of a mile from Fort Wagner, at which 
last post the undulating and successive ranges of sand hills shielded them 
and their operations from our view. In the course of the morning of 
Tuesday, the 14th, their riflemen gave us some annoyance; and during the 
day the wooden vessels of the fleet, aided by one turreted iron-clad, at- 
tacked our works .... I determined to make a slight reconnoissance at 
night (to feel the enemy and add to the confidence of the garrison), and 
ordered a party .... of 150 men .... under Maj. Ryan of Nelson's 
South Carolina Battalion, to push forward, drive in the enemy's pickets, 
and feel its way till it encountered a heavy supporting force .... Maj. 
Ryan pushed the pickets and first reserve back upon a reserve brigade, in 
such disorder that the latter tired upon their retreating companions, in- 
flicting a heavy loss I established rifle-pits some 200 yards outside 

the works (the nearest practicable point) , and made such dispositions for 
holding the post against assault (by assigning each command to its particu- 
lar position) as were necessary. On Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, the 
bombardment was kept up from 10 to 5 daily .... about 300 shots per 
day. [He then says the enemy erected batteries during those days under 
cover of the sand hills, and unmasked them; but all were out of range of 
Wagner's guns. — D. E.] 

On Saturday, the ISth, at 8.15 a.m., the enemy having discharged his 
land batteries, brought up to their support his entire fleet .... with this 
immense circle of fire, by land and sea, he poured for eleven hours, Avith- 
out cessation or intermission, a storm of shot and shell upon Fort Wagner, 
which is perhaps unequalled in history .... [He then estimates that 
" 9,000 shot and shell" Mere fired that day by the enemy. — D. E.] 

The garrison consisted of the Charleston Battalion (Lieut.-Col. 
Gaillard), whose position extended from the sally port, in Light-House 
Inlet Creek [He really meant Vincent's Creek. — D. E.], at the right, to 
the left until it rested on Col. jNIcKethan's regiment, the Fifty-first North 
Carolina. This regiment's line extended to the gun-chamber opposite the 
bomb-proof door, at which point, and extending along the face of the 
work, to the left of the sally port next to Fort Gregg, the Thirty-flrst 
North Carolina (Lieut.-Col. Knight) occupied the work. These positions 
for the infantry were verified by frequent inspections, and the several 
commands were required to sleep in position ; and each man was instructed 
as to the exact position he should occupy and which in any moment of 
confusion, he would be required to gain and hold. In addition to this, a 






330 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [July '63. 

sraall portion of the Thirty-first North Carolina were held as a reserve 
on the parade ground, and a part occupied the parapet just to the right of 
the sail)' port. 

On the outside of the fort, two companies of the Charleston Battalion 
held the sand hills along the beach, their face extending from the sally 
port to the sea beach. 

The artillerists occupied the several gun chambers ; and two light field- 
pieces were placed in battery, outside the fort on the traverse, near the 
sally port. The artillery command consisted of Capts. Tatum's and Adams' 
First South Carolina Infantry, Buckner's and Dixon's Sixty-third Georgia 
Heavy Artillery, and Capt. DuPass, commanding Light Artillery, all under 
the general command of Lieut. -Col. Simpkins, Chief of Artillery. 

" The infantry except the Charleston Battalion, and the artillery except 
the gun detachments, were placed, shortly after the shelling commenced, 
under cover of the bomb-proofs. The first-named battalion, with heroic 
intrepidity never surpassed, animated by the splendid example of their 
field officers, Lieut. -Col. Gaillard and Maj. Ramsay, had no protection except 

such as the parapet attbrded 

__. ..^ .^ them, yet maintained their posi- 

^==^2iil~: - "c-^^^^Si-j^ tion without flinching the entire 

^S; "" The 10-inch gun was fired at 

^ ^^ ^ intervals of ten or fifteen min- 

^si/f^: ' -^ utes affainst the iron-clads, and 

^^^1"f*__ '; B the heavy guns of the land face 

iSlf^**"' Is:- " were fired whenever the working 

parties or cannoneers of the en- 
emy on the land showed them- 
selves within range. The mortar, 
in charge of Capt. Tatum, was 
2 fired every half hour. The casu- 

^ _ CO-Zj^ -^ alties during the day, from the 

~^ , ^ bombardment, did not exceed 

"S?"^' >i\A ,0*''V --/* eight killed and twentv wounded. 

^'-■•''-'^ \^^\^U"M I. -^,.^ .w. .«*' \KhQVi^ 10 A.M., th^ flag hal- 

BEACON HOUSE, MORRIS ISLAND, S.C. liards were cut, and the Confed- 
erate flag blew over into the 
fort. Instantly Maj. Ramsay of the Charleston Battalion, Lieut. Rudick of 
the Sixty-third Georgia Heavy Artillery, Sergt. Shelton and Private Flynn 
of the Charleston Battalion sprang forAvard and replaced the flag upon the 
ramparts, while at the same time Capt. Barnwell of the Engineers dashed 
out, seized a battle flag and erected it by the side of the garrison flag. 
This flag was subsequently shot away and replaced by Private G. Gilliland 
of the Charleston Battalion. 

As night approached, the increased severity of the bombardment 
plainly indicated that an assault would be made, and orders were issued to 
prepare to man the ramparts. At 7.45 p.m., the lines of the enemy were seen 
advancing, and the bombardment slackened to an occasional shell .... As 
the enemy advanced, they were met by a shower of grape and canister from 
our guns and a terrible fire of musketry from the Charleston Battalion and 
from the Fifty-first North Carolina. These two commands gallantly main- 
tained their position and drove the enemy back quickly from their front, 
Avith immense slaughter. 

In the meantime, on the left of the work, the Thirty-first North 
Carolina could not be induced to occupy their position, and ingloriously 
deserted the ramparts, when, no resistance being off'ered at this point, the 
advance of the enemy, pushing forward, entered the ditch, and ascended 
the work at the extreme left salient of the land face and occupied it. I at 
once directed Lieut. -Col. Gaillard to keep up a severe enfilading fire to his 
left and directed the field-pieces on the left of the fort, outside the sally 
port, to direct their fire to the right so as to sweep the ditch and exterior 
slope of that part of the work thus occupied, and thus at the same time 
prevent the enemy from being supported at that point and cut oft' all hope 



JuUrGS.-] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 331 

of his escape. The main body of the enemy, after a brief attempt to pass 
over the field of fire, retreated under the fire of our artillery aud the shells 
of Fort Sumter, and must have suffered heavily as long as they were -within 
range of our guns. Col. Harris of the Engineers, to whose skill I am much 
indebted .... placed a howitzer on the right of the fort, outside the beach, 
and co-operated with the guns on the left. Thinking it advisable to dis- 
lodge the enemy at once, before they had time to communicate their tem- 
porary success, I called for volunteers to dislodge them. This call was 
promptly met by Maj. McDonald of the Fifty-first North Carolina and Capt. 
Ryan of the Charleston Battalion. I selected Capt. Ryan's company, and 
directed them to charge the enemy in the salient. This work they advanced 
to with great spirit; but, unfortunately, Capt. Ryan was killed at the 
moment of advance, and his men hesitated, and the opportunity was lost. 
Whenever the enemy showed themselves, a sharp fire Avas kept upon them 
by the Fifty-first North Carolina ; aud after considerable injury thus inflicted, 
a party of the Thirty-second Georgia having been sent along the parapet to 
the left aud on the top of the magazine to approach their rear, they 
surrendered. 

In front of the fort, the scene of carnage is indescribable. The 
repulse was overwhelming, and the loss of the enemy I estimate at 2,000 
killed, wounded and missing. Our loss I estimate at 50 killed and 150 
wounded, but will forward an exact return. The assailants consisted of 
troops from Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Hampshire, Ohio and New 
York, and the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts negro regiment (under Col. Shaw, 
who was killed), under the command of Brig. -Gen. Strong. The supports 
Avere commanded by Brig.-Gen. Putnam .... In conclusion, whilst I feel 
it my duty to mention the disgraceful conduct of the Thirty-first North 
Carolina, I am proud to bear testimony to the efficiency and gallantry of the 
other troops .... I have the honor to be ... . 

WiLLi.\M B Taliaferro, 

Br if I. -Gen. 

[Confederate letter, from Fort Sumter, 20 July 18('>3.] 

.... When the enemy had reached the commencement of the open 
plain in front of and entirely commanded by the battery [Wagner], the 
First Brigade, under Gen. Strong, being formed in two columns, made a 
dashing charge for our works. They reached the battery, but were re- 
pulsed and driven back in confusion. Immediately, the Second Brigade, 
under Col. Putnam, moved to the assault, and reached and took possession 
of the main part of our works ; but the ditch in front, filled with dead and 
dying, and the scattered dead and wounded across the whole plain, told how 
dearly they had paid for it. The enemy kept possession of the portion they 
had taken for three-quarters of an hour, were there in force even after all 
the rest of their comrades had retreated, and. but for a gallant charge of a 
handful of men of the Charleston Battalion, led by Gen.^Taliaferro m per- 
son, they would well-nigh have taken our works" .... If the enemy had 
been supported, I believe the battery would have fallen. ... I visited the 
battery yesterday .... one pile of negroes numbered thirty .... whites 
and blacks were killed on top of our breastwoi'ks as well as inside .... 
The negroes fought gallantly and were headed by as brave a Colonel as ever 
lived. He mounted the works sword in hand .... the negroes were as 
fine looking a set as I ever saw — large, strong, muscular fellows. 

The Avriter then says of the flag of truce sent out by the Yankees, 
that Gen. Hagood declined the offer to bury, saying we would attend 
to that. He then says that by mutual consent there was no firing, and 
the pickets and burial parties commingled more or less during the day. 

[Extracts from private letter of Gen. Taliaferro.] 

It is hardly possible to describe the effect of the semi-circle of fire 
.... which unceasingly for nearly twelve hours rained destructive missiles 
upon our devoted work; but, fortunately, during that unexampled bombard- 



'332 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [-/»/;/ '63. 

ment only 8 were killed and 20 wounded .... I had taken the precaution 
to train the men to form at a si,i^nal along the faces of the fort .... and 
every man knew his particular spot .... I had also taken the precaution 
to leave some field guns and 8-inch shell guns covered with (buried under) 
sand bags to protect them from inevitable destruction. These were ex- 
humed as soon as the fire of the ships materially slackened, and they were 
ready for use before the assault was made. To these measures of fortunate 
forethought I attribute very much of oar success in repelling the assault. 

When the bombardment had nearly ceased, which Avas, I think, not 
long before eight o'clock, I ordered the troops to their several positions, 
knowing that "the lull in fire portended an assault; and indeed the dark 
masses of the advancing columns coiild be indistinctly seen in the distance. 
.... One regiment, however, I am pained to say, had become to much ex- 
tent demoralized, and the greater part could not be forced from the shelter 
of the traverses andt)omb-proofs. Thesemen were to take position at .... 
the salient next the sea shore, and hence it Avas really unoccupied, and there 
was little or no resistance at that point 

I kneAV the topography of the island immediately in my front better 
than you did. I knew that Vincent's Creek made up from the marsh on 
your [the Federal] left and Avould intercept the left of your line, causing it 
to oblique to the right .... and produce confusion and perhaps delay . . 
. . I have always thought my surmise correct, and certainly thought I dis- 
covered it at the time" Acting on this belief .... I hastened along the 
line and prohibited all firing, as far as it was possible for the officers to 
control it — a thing difficult to do, even with veteran troops — until after 
that point (the point of obliquing and confusion) was reached; and I di- 
rected Col. Gaillard, commanding the Charleston men, to deliver no direct 
fire, but to fire obliquely to his left when the proper time arrived. He 
occupied the extreme rig"ht (next Vincent's Creek). The guns which had 
been .... exhumed Avere made ready for service ; and although the heavy 
guns had all been dismounted or rendered unserviceable and generally 
knocked to pieces by the ships' and land batteries, we Avere, nevertheless, 
in a much better condition to receive your terrible assault than .... could 
reasonably have been expected .... 

You are correct in supposing that every eflbrt was made .... to 
depress the pieces .... sometimes to the extent of taking the piece and 
firing it myself to teach the proper depression. The light guns, Avhich you 
had every reason to suppose had been destroyed, played a very important 
part and, I have ahvays thought, a very unexpected one to you, in stagger- 
ing your advance. My fire .... Avas reserved till you had reached Vincent's 
Creek .... and had become confused .... and then it was delivered 
from cannon and small arms Avith all the rapidity Ave were capable of. It 
was a moment of intense excitement, suspense and responsibility. It was 
aAvful to look upon — the surging mass of assailants Avhich rushed like a 
torrent to overAvhelm us; and I feared that the mere force of momentum, 
independent of the gallantry Avhich characterized you, would overcome the 
obstacles AA-hich our ditch, nearly filled up, and the exterior slope of our 
work, crushed doAvn to an easy angle by the terrible poAver of your shot and 
shell, presented to your approach. 

The onset Avas furious and brave. Although the odds were greatly in 
your favor, so far as numbers Avere concerned, it required nerve, enthusiasm 
and discipline to face the iron and leaden storm which met you. But you 
met it ; and although forced to recoil before it, you neA-ertheless deserve 
full meed of praise for the heroic effort .... 

The account you have heard of the assaulting force penetrating the 
work and holding a part of it for hours is true ; but I do not think they 
held the bastion ionger than tAvo hours. It is certain they gave me great 
trouble to dislodge them, and they fought with a desperation Avhich seemed 
to proceed from an idea that Ave Avould sIioav them no quarter .... In the 
gun chambers Avhich they held they were as well protected as Ave were, and 
they kept up a steady and most determined fire upon the only approach to 
their position. I organized a party to storm their stronghold; but it Avas 
driven back Avith the loss of Capt. Ryan, who commanded it, and several 



Jail/ '63.1 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 333 

men. After this Ave directed our attention to keeping them in until tliey 
would surrender. Parties were organized and sent along the traverses, and 
a fire opened on them from the tops of the traverses and bomb-proofs. 
They at last surrendered. 

.... The carnage was frightful. I have never seen so many dead in 
the same space. My loss was 50 killed, including some valuable officers, 
and 150 wounded, including those killed and wounded during the bombard- 
ment .... I went to Charleston on the morning of the 19th .... leaving 
Gen. Hagood in charge .... Gen. Hagood, with the Thirty-second Georgia. 
Col. Harrison had been sent from Charleston to reinforce me, but did not 
arrive until some time after the assault had been repulsed. His men, how- 
ever, rendered much service in attacking and causing the surrender of those 
who held the angle of the work. 

The following extract from the Philadelphia Weekly Times of 
11th Nov. 1882, is from the pen of Gen. W. B. Taliaferro (Con- 
federate) : — 

The garrison was about 1,700 men ; the earth-Avork solidly constructed, 
with a heavy parapet and deep, dry ditch; embrasures revetted with pal- 
metto logs and turf, and the magazines and bomb-proofs covered with ten 
feet of sand. There was a long row of low, wooden buildings on the west 
side of the fort, for officers' and men's quarters, and the guns were properly 
traversed. [To guard against surprise he says they dug rifle-pits, at night, 
200 yards in advance of the fort, and established pickets on both sides of 
the island.] These pits were detached sinks, with the sand thrown in front, 
and traversed on the side next the ships, and extended across the island, 
and held three or four men each. [Gen. Taliaferro assumed command the 
13th.] 

On the night of the Uth, to protect and also inspire the working 
parties, a sortie, with 150 men under Maj. Rion of the Nelson Battalion, 
was made, and the Federal positions .... ascertained. 

[Gen. Taliaferro mentions the council of war held at Charleston, the 
prime question being, " Shall we drive the Yankees from Morris Island?" 
which was decided negatively, a policy of defence and retardation being 
adopted. — I). E.] 

It was a novel and curious spectacle to witness these monsters [the 
monitors] come into action. Like huge water dogs, their black sides glis- 
tening in the sun, and showing their lines above water, they would apparently 
swim without eflbrt into range, then seem to dive under water, showing only 
their horrid heads, represented by their turrets, above the sea, and then 
opening their red mouths, bark deep-toned defiance at their enemies. Nothing 
could be seen but the drum-like black objects that, like buoys, rested on the 
water, apparently anchored at the bottom ; but they would then by some 
unseen and mysterious power guiding them from the depths below, shift 
their positions and derange the range of the guns trained upon them. Their 
ricochet shots were admirable. Striking the sea they would skip along, 
making what the boys call " ducks and drakes," and then roll into the fort, 
or bound clear over the work and explode in the salt marsh clear beyond. 
On one occasion, one of these shells, striking a shoal of mullets, hurled some 
of them into the fort, the men who fired that gun becoming unconscious 
rebels by giving aid and comfort to the enemy ; and thus, although belonging 
to an iron-clad fleet, debarred themselves literally from taking an iron-clad 
oath 

On the morning of the 14th, Capt. Waring was shot through the body 
by a stray musket ball, and expired almost instantly. The nearest Federal 

was three-quarters of a mile away For fear that communications 

with the city and the mainland, which was had by steamboat at night to 
Cumming's Point, should be interrupted, rations and ordnance stores had 
been accumulated ; but there was trouble about water. Some was sent from 
Charleston, and wells had been dug in the sand inside and outside of the 
fort ; but it was not good. Sand bags had been provided, and trenching 
tools supplied sufficient for any supposed requirement. 



334 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. [Juhj'63. 

[He theu goes on to say that he did not, as reported, have the key to 
the Federal signal code prior to tlie assault, but says he afterward obtained 
it and read the signals Avith ease. He then refers again to the attack itself 
and quotes the language of Chaplain Densmore, of a Northern regiment, at 
its reunion] : " Words cannot depict the thunder, the smoke, the lifted sand, 
and the general havoc which characterized that hot summer day. What a 
storm of iron fell on that island ! The roar of the guns was incessant. How 
the shots plowed the sand banks and the marshes ; how the splinters flew 
from the Beacon House; how the whole island smoked like a furnace and 
trembled as from an earthquake 1 " 

If that was true outside of Wagner, it is easy to conceive how intensi- 
fied the situation inside its narrow limits, toward which every hostile gun 
was pointed. The sand came down in avalanches; huge, vertical shells, 
and those rolled over by the ricochet shots from the ships, buried them- 
selves and then exploded, rending the earth and forming great craters, out 
of which the sand and iron fragments flew high in air. It was now a fierce 
sirocco, freighted with iron as Veil as sand. The sand flew over from the 
seashore, from the glacis, from the exterior slope, from the parapet, as it 
was ploAved up and lifted and driven by resistless force, now in spray, now 
almost in waves, over into the work, the men sometimes half buried by the' 
moving mass. 

Our chief anxiety Avas about the magazines. The profile of the fort 
miftht be destroyed, the ditch filled up, the traverses and the bomb-proof 
barracks knocked out of shape, and the protecting banks of sand Avould 
still afl'ord them shelter : but if the coverings of the magazines Avere blown 
aAvay and they become exposed, the explosion that Avonld ensue Avould lift 
fort and garrison into the air and annihilate all in general chaos. The 
magazines" Avere carefully watched and their condition frequently reported. 
" . . . . The Avant of water was felt ; but now again, unconsciously, the 
enemy came to the assistance of the garrison : for water was actually 
scooped from the craters made by the shells. Several men were killecf by 
concussion alone. Capt. TAviggs, a stafl" officer, was seen to fall, and was 
apparently dead Avithout a scratch. He was, however, reanimated by the 
use of strong restoratives. 

Coneeruiug the introduction to the first monitor, in the bom- 
bardment of Fort Wagner, Col. Olmstead (Confederate) says : — 

I well remember the approach of the first monitor. How deliberate 
its movements; hoAv insignificant its appearance! the deck almost level 
Avith the water, and the liftle black turret giving small promise of its hidden 
poAver for attack. My curiosity about the vessel Avas great, but Avas soon 
to be satisfied without stint. There Avas a slow, revolving motion of the 
turret, a cloud of smoke, a deafening roar: and then, with the noise and 
rush of an express train, the huge fifteen-inch shell, visible at every point 
of its trajectory, passed overhead and burst far in our rear. The next 
exploded in the parapet. The introduction was complete. 



AFTER WAGNEE. 

The Historian of the One Hundredth XeAv York says: "The 
casualties .... changed the command. Gens. Seymour and 
Strons; .... wounded and unfit for duty, and Gen. Terry placed 
in command on Morris Island; and Gen. Vogdes, who previously 
had command at Folly Island, was now placed in command of 
Strong's brigade ; and Col. DaA'is, One Hundred and Fourth Penn- 
syh'ania, assigned to Folly Island. 

Beauregard giA-es the losses as 3,000 on the Federal side, and 
his loss at llA during the assault and bombardment of same day. 
He says, "We buried 800 bodies in front of Wagner next morning." 



July '63.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 335 

The Century's War Book, "Battles aud Leaders," gives the 
following-: "The two assaulting brigades, of 5,000 men, had — 
killed, -Hd ; wounded, 880 ; captured or missing, 389 : total, 1,515 ; 
while the other side lost a total of 174." 



] 9 July : Now^ that the account of the fight is completed and 
the night has passed, we find ourselves up betimes ; and every man 
able to stand is gazing Wagner-ward, as if entranced, and each, uo 
doubt, wondering if the night before was a hallucination or a reality. 
The dead, the w^ounded and the dying, and the busy scenes going on 
before our eyes, soon brought us to a realizing sense of stern reality. 
Such is War. The iron-clads lay calmly at their anchors ; the sun 
shone serenely ; the waves of the sea broke monotonously upon a 
smooth and peaceful shore. But, oh, the horrors of last night! 
We must up and at it, however. There 's much to do. The dead to be 
buried, the wounded to be cared for and sent away to the General 
Hospitals at Hilton Head and Beaufort, Avhere they can receive 
better care than can possibly be given them on Morris Island. And 
amid all this work it must not be lost sight of by the reader that a 
bristling front must be kept up. Men must work also at prepara- 
tions against a possible attack. Though weakened numerically, we 
must not let that fact be too apparent to our foe, and he attack us 
on that basis. He too may have been weakened ; but we have our 
doubts as to whether he has been weakened to any alarming extent. 

Here are several items of the 19th. It was Sunday, and the 
incidents of the day only tended to make the day all the more solemn. 
Dahlgren says in his book that the navy sent a flag of truce by 





BAR5H0T. CHAIAI SHOT. 

Lieut. Preston and Surg. Duvall, to ask for the wounded or to ask 
privilege of sending medical assistance; both of which offers the 
enemy declined, saying they would bury the dead and care for the 
wounded. 

Band Master lugalls' (at Hilton Head) diary says: "Two 
steamers loaded with wounded arrived here tonight." The wounding 
of Gens. Strong and Seymour aud Col. Jackson, and the non- 
appearance of Lieut. -Col. Bedel (we didn't know where he was for 
about three days), caused changes in the commands. Maj. Plimpton 
was placed in temporary command of the First Brigade, with Lieut. 
Dow of our regiment as Acting Assistant Adjutant-General. Our 
regiment was called on to furnish a burial detail, and Lieut. Morrill 
went in charge of it. A diary says: "Went up with flag of truce, 
and got permission to bury a part of the dead, and obtained an 
armistice for 24 hours." 



336 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJuUj '63. 

Gen. Taliaferro was relieved in the morning from the command 
of Fort Wagner (and Morris Island forces) by Gen. Hagood, Gen. 
Taliaferro's tour of duty having expired. 

One of our hospital nurses says : "I worked all night last night 
dressing wounds." We heard the Forty-eighth New York had only 
four officers for duty, and the Sixth Connecticut was not much better 
off. 

The Neiu York Herald of 29 July said a Confederate report 
was that they buried 600 of our dead and had 276 prisoners. 



FORT WAGNER VS. FORT SAUNDERS. 

Pollard's (Confederate) "Third Year of War" says: "The 
Confederate loss at Fort Saunders, out of 18 regiments, was 129 
killed, 458 wounded and 813 taken prisoners; while the Union loss 
at Fort Wagner was 1,515 out of 10 regiments." (The engagement 
at Fort Saunders occurred Sunday, 29 Nov. 1863, at 2 a.m.) 



WAGNER ASSAULT ITEMS. 

The New Yoi'k Herald of 31 July 1863 says: "We learn that 
of the 264. wounded prisoners in the hands of the rebels, taken at 
Morris Island, 51 have died in hospital, and 108 are too badly 
wounded to be removed. There have been many amputations, and 
quite a number remaining are known to be mortally wounded." 

The Charleston Mercury of Monday, 20 July, has the follow- 
ing : — 

When the enemy had reached a point about GO yards distant, our 
infantry .... poured a galling lire into the moving masses .... the 
Yankees, nevertlieless, in considerable numbers, succeeded in gaining the 
trench, and began to clamber up the sides of the battery .... Lieut. Wales 
of Blake Battery .... with tAvo brass howitzers .... swept the trench 
.... the second assault was still more desperate than the first, and was 
met and repelled in the same gallant style by our brave troops : Georgians, 
North Carolinians and sons of our own city, who stood shoulder to shoulder 
in the fight. On the center of our lines, a small body of the enemy succeeded 
in gaining a lodgment in a salient, the gun of which had been disabled. They 
maintained their position for an hour or two. 

The Charleston Cotirier of 23 July 1863 says : — 
Rumors are rife that a regiment or a large portion of a regiment from 
North Carolina behaved very badly, went into the fight reluctantly and did 
nothing in the fight but kill and wound some of our own men .... Let us 
have the facts .... 

The Thirty-first North Carolina, in response to invitation to 
clear its record of 18 July, forwarded a letter to the editor of the 
Charleston CoKrier, dated Sullivan's Island, 23 July (published 25th), 
saying the men were on the parapet on the day in question. All of 
regiment except two companies at Gregg. The letter was signed by 
Adjt. E. K. Bryan, and North Carolina papers were requested to 
copy. 

It appears that a definite truce for burial of the dead was not 
reached till Tuesday (the charge was on Saturday night) . The New 
York Herald of the 27th says: "Early Tuesday morning, burial 



July '63.^ THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 337 

parties, by permission of the enemy, went clown to bury our dead 
outside the rebel works. The bodies had to be interred uneoffiued, 
without being identified ; but such are the fortunes of war." 

The work occupied nearly the same site as an earthwork built 
by Col. Thomas M. Wagner for a small sea battery ; indeed, the 
Wagner of July 1863 was composed in part of the former work. 

From a Confederate source : " Strange as it may seem, the fol- 
lowing are officially reported as captured by the Abolitionists on that 
eventful night: Lieut. James Campbell (Co. F), Private Thomas 
Phelan (Co. B) and John Crowell (Co. B), all of the Charleston 
Battalion; Corp. Wm. Garrett, Co. E, Thirty-first North Carolina; 
Private James Braugham, Co. H, First South Carolina Infantry and 
Private Charles Peterson, Co. K, Sixty-third Greorgia Infantry. 



19 July: Gen. Beauregard (Confederate) wrote to Gen. Ripley 
concerning flag of truce as follows: "Should they ask permission 
to bury their dead, it is my wish you should not allow the enemy to 
approach our works {I. e., Wagner), but the bodies be sent to their 
lines. I think it well to propose a parole of wounded prisoners." 

20 July ft'hief Elngineer Echols (Confederate) to Chief Engineer 
Harris] : "Capt. Gray has taken down 50 10-iuch shells with water- 
proof caps, for planting in front of Battery Wagner tonight. There 
are no Rains' torpedoes to be had. These shells will answer the 
purpose, being arranged with the same caps as Rains'." These were 
evidently to replace those exploded on the IHth. 

At a little before noon we were ordered out on the beach; 
and about the same time our monitors opened on Wagner, and 
these were soon joined by the shore batteries. AVe remained on 
the beach till night, when we were put on picket to the extreme 
front, where we remained till next morning, being shelled at fre- 
quent intervals, just to keep us from getting too sleepy. 
General Ordtr No. 10, \ Department of the South. 

Second Series. ) Headquarters in the Field, 

Morris Island, 20 July 18G3. 

No officer or soldier of this command will in any manner interfere with 
the man on the look-out or be allowed to handle Ms glass. Any one violating 
this order will be reported to these Headquarters. 
Edw. W. SunTH, Q. A. Gillmore, 

Assistaiit Adjutant-General . Brig.-Gen. Commanding . 

21 July : There were two flags of truce today. One was to get 
the body of an officer killed on the 10th. The Sixth Connecticut was 
sent to Hilton Head, and the Fourth New Hampshire moved over to 
Morris from Folly Island. Gen. Terry in command of the forces on 
Morris Island. The land batteries and Wagner were practically silent 
during the da}', but the navy shelled Wagner considerably. We re- 
ceived an order to select two officers and six men to go North after 
drafted men (see 22d). We changed camp-ground a little and for 
the better. The firing on both sides continued. 

22 July : The call for a detail to go North created considerable 
talk ; and there were several phases which the matter developed. 
First, we were reminded forcibly by it that the draft was about to 



338 



THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 



[,/»/// '63. 



begin — a very important matter and most decidedly a war measure. 
Sorry were we that volunteers did not come forward in sufficient 
numbers ; but, on the other hand, we did not object to forcing them 
to the front by draft if they would not otherwise come. Second, 
who were the persons to be selected, and will they have to go armed 
to the teeth and be obliged to force the drafted men to the front by 
holding a cocked revolver under each man's ear ; and if so got to the 




PLAN OF PORT JOHNSON. 

front, what will such a man be good for, and so on ? The question 
nearest to our hearts as individuals was, "I wonder if the lot will fall 
on me to go North ; and if not, upon whom? The 22d developed the 
lucky ones, and preference was given largely to those slightly wounded. 
The detail (all regiments sent a detail) comprised the following : 
Col. John H. Jackson, Capt. R. F. Clark of Co. A, Sergt. D. Eldredge 
of Co. K (the writer), Sergt. Chas. S. Hazen of Co. E, Sergt. John 



Jul;/ '63.] THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 330 

H. Hitchcock of Co. I, Corpl. L. N. Jackman of Co. F, Private 
Woodbury Berry of Co. B (Regtl. Farrier and Colonel's Orderly), 
Private Geo. F. Lord of Co. B (Adjutant's Clerk) . Their duties and 
experiences on detached service will be treated separately. 

We were paid on the 22(1 for May and June. Lieut. Place's 
resignation accepted. We were short of officers ; and the two to go 
North and Lieut. Place's resignation took three more away. Acting 
Adjt. Copp still remained sick, and Lieut. Dow was Acting Adjutant. 
First Sergt. Lamprey of B, and Sergt. Hazen of E, were that day 
(prior to the detail to go North) ordered to act as 2d lieutenants. 

On that day the first authentic news reached us that Lieut. -Col. 
Bedel was a prisoner and at Charleston. He had been variously 
reported as having been wounded and sent to Hilton Head, as killed 
and left on the field, etc. 

A letter of the 22d, written to Gov. Berry by Col. Jackson, says 
our loss on the 10th was 41 killed and wounded, and on the 18th 
nearly as many. 

Gillmore meant to stay. He asked the navy for two Whitworth 
guns. 

Here is an important fact, which should not be overlooked : 
Gen. Gillmore sent the conscript detail North wholly without orders 
to do so. He saw by the papers that other regiments (North) were 
doing it, and assumed that the order for Department of the South 
had been delayed. He was correct. 

23 July : The conscript detail left Morris Island, gomg out on 
the little Steamer Flora, and from it transferred to the Arago, which 
arrived off the island a little past noon. The command of the regi- 
ment then devolved on Capt. Kandlett, his only senior of our regi- 
ment on the island being Maj. Plimpton, and he was Acting Assistant 
Inspector-General. Capt. Allen started on a 20 days' leave, and 
Dr. Kimball was sent to Beaufort for temporary dutj^ in hospital 
there, thus further depleting our list of officers present for duty. 

As an incident (with a moral attached) , the writer whispers in 
the reader's off ear at this point that he was obliged today by the 
exigencies of the service to take his only shirt present for duty and 
launder it, pending his departure North, and to order it on duty 
again before the lingering moisture of the laundryman had departed : 
because, forsooth, the Arago arrived all too soon. This is strictly 
confidential. 

It rained a little during the day, and there was but little firing. 
Each side was probably getting into shape to renew the exchange of 
iron. The gunboat Dai CJiing arrived from the North. At night 
we furnished a considerable detail for post guard, and the rest of 
the regiment (a few officers and about 240 men) were sent out on 
picket. 

Gey. Gillmore sent message to Washington the 23d as follows : 
" My Medical Director in the Field reports an aggregate loss in killed 
,and wounded, in ovr hands, of 635. I judge there are 350 missing. 
The losses cover the three actions of the 10th, 11th and l<sth insts." 
This proved very erroneous as to numbers. 



340 THIRD NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. IJvhj '63. 

24 July : We were not relieved very early in the clay ; and as a 
result we came back to camp rather cross. A flag of truce by Fed- 
eral Steamer Cosmopolitcm and the rebel Steamer AUcp, resulting in 
an exchange of prisoners. A Confederate account of it saj's that 
about noon the Alice came down, flying a hospital flag and a flag of 
truce, to meet the Cosmopolitan. That while the exchange was going 
on, the relief affoixled to Wagner by the consequent cessation of the 
bombardment was of great value. That during that time Wagner 
was extensively repaired. He says that one shell had carried away 
the air flue of the magazine, and the exploding shell had thrown its 
light into the magazine itself, and the men on duty in it had come 
out without the least hesitation. He further says that the enemy's 
(Federal) dead from the assaults of the 11th and 18th were buried 
in front of Wagner's moat, and their own dead buried back of and 
near to the fort. He says further that Wagner had only one gun — 
a 10-inch Columbiad, located just over the sally port — to fight the 
monitors with, and that even that was dismounted, disabled and 
repaired several times during the siege [his letter bears date 24 
July. — D. E.] Early in the siege the Federal signal code was 
captured by them on a signal officer, near Georgetown, S. C, and 
the key obtained by a Confederate prisoner in the garb of a Yankee, 
who was a fellow-prisoner. [This capture of our code is denied. — 
D. E.] On the 18th, the following message from Gil